Noland Medal Awarded to Bob Moje in 2019

A founding principal of VMDO Architects, Robert W. Moje, FAIA, will be recognized with the William C. Noland Medal at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, at the Hilton Downtown Richmond. As the highest honor bestowed by AIA Virginia to an architect, the Noland Medal is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, spanning a broad spectrum of the profession, and transcending the scope of normal professional activities. The honor is in memory of William C. Noland, FAIA, one of the founders of the AIA in Virginia, its second president, and Virginia’s first member to be elevated to fellowship.

“Bob’s work in architecture is framed by three essential, interrelated commitments: a commitment to the discipline and practice as a public, civic endeavor; a commitment therefore to the communities in which he is called to work; and further, a specific commitment to education as both the fundamental design commission and the fundamental societal value … [his] design vision and leadership is purposeful, utterly authentic, and deeply holistic.”

Peter MacKeith, Dean and Professor, University of Arkansas

Moje has been a leader in the planning and design of educational facilities for more than 42 years. Through his award-winning designs, research, and professional and public service, he has advanced the practice of educational facility design considerably. His innovative instructional environments have elevated the level of discourse on design, teaching, learning, and the communal aspect of educational facilities on an international scale. In 2014, he served as chair for the global AIA Committee on Architecture for Education (CAE) conference titled The Value of Design: Enhancing Education through Architecture in Barcelona, Spain.

A regular juror for awards programs, including the national CAE Design Awards, he supports innovative work through the recognition of design solutions that enhance learning. He has also collaborated with the National Institutes of Health, the University of Nebraska Medical Center, the University of Virginia School of Medicine, and the Green Schools National Network to study the environmental effects of school buildings on children’s health and happiness. In addition to receiving the 2012 Prize for Design Research and Scholarship from the AIA Virginia, he partnered with the U.S. Green Building Council to develop a LEED Credit for school buildings that contribute to the physical fitness and health of thier occupants.

Moje has a long history of service to his profession and his community. Since 1997 he has served as the only architect on the Commonwealth of Virginia Joint House/Senate Subcommittee on Educational Infrastructure. He has also contributed his time on the Charlottesville Board of Architecture review, including a stint as chair, the Virginia Computer Foundation, the Virginia Center for Architecture, and numerous others.  

Beyond his design and research accomplishments, he has been an exemplary leader at VMDO. He helped establish a firm culture that is people-oriented, family-friendly, and inclusive of different viewpoints, backgrounds, and experience levels. He has contributed an effective transition plan and a generous profit-sharing system that is available to all at the firm.

CALL for NOMINATIONS: Honors Awards

Braden Field, AIA, Nathan Harper, AIA, and Maggie Schubert, AIA, were recognized with the Virginia Emerging Professional Award at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017

The AIA Virginia Honors Committee is asking you to take a look at the Honors categories, review the selection criteria, and then ask yourself a few questions:

1. Do you think you might be a candidate for one of these honors?
2. Do you have a colleague who deserves one?

If the answer to either of these questions is yes, we encourage you to submit your nomination for AIA Virginia’s Honors Awards.

 

AIA Virginia’s honors program recognizes the best efforts of Virginians who, by profession or avocation, have made creating, preserving, and enhancing Virginia’s communities an important life commitment.

Submit your nominations online. The deadline is 5 p.m., July 13, 2018.

Nominations must be submitted electronically. Nominations should be submitted as one PDF document up to 20 pages (not including letters of support) and no larger than 30 MB.

Eligibility criteria and submission requirements vary by award. Click on the awards listed below for additional details and to review past recipients.

Nominations for all AIA Virginia honors may be made by individual members, by chapter honors committees, by Society committees, or by the Board of Directors itself. Current AIA Virginia Board members and Honors Committee members are not eligible for any award. No member of the Honors Committee may be used as a reference or advisor or be solicited by the candidate or the candidate’s advisor.  See the 2018 Honors Committee members.

Award Categories

The William C. Noland Medal, as the highest award bestowed on a member architect, is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, that spans a broad spectrum of the profession and that transcends the scope of normal professional activities. Only one medal may be bestowed each year.

The Architecture Medal for Virginia Service is AIA Virginia’s most prestigious public award, honoring an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of the built environment. Only one medal may be bestowed each year but may be given simultaneously to more than one person.

The T. David Fitz-Gibbon Virginia Architecture Firm Award, as the highest honor bestowed by AIA Virginia to a Virginia-based architecture firm, recognizes a firm that has consistently produced distinguished architecture for at least ten years.

The Virginia Emerging Professional Award is intended to recognize the accomplishments of emerging leaders in Virginia for their contributions to the profession in one or more of the following categories: design, research, education, or discourse; service to the profession; mentorship; or service to the community.

The Award for Distinguished Achievement signals distinguished achievement by an architect in any one of the following categories: design, practice, education, service as “citizen architect”, and service to the profession; and thus may serve as an accolade for the work of an entire career or recognize the current accomplishments of a younger leader. Up to three awards may be bestowed each year.

Honorary Membership is bestowed upon a person of esteemed character who is not eligible for membership in the AIA Virginia but who has rendered distinguished and exemplary service, over a sustained period of time, to architecture and the built environment within the domain of AIA Virginia.

Professor Robert Dunay Honored With Noland Medal

Throughout his  40-year career integrating teaching, research, and scholarship, Robert Dunay, FAIA, has expanded and refined the national discourse of architectural education. In multiple roles, he established innovative cross-disciplinary projects linking academia and practice through combined education al and applied research venues.  He has taught and significantly influenced thousands of architects; many who still reside in Virginia. As a consequence, he has had a significant impact on the quality of Architecture in the Commonwealth. Design Intelligence has ranked him as the Most Admired Design Educator four times — the most of any faculty in its 15 years of existence.

His contributions to education are matched by his advancements in professional knowledge building. His leadership of students and other faculty has positioned Virginia Architecture in the national and international arenas. LumenHAUS, a project sponsored by the Department of Energy for which Dunay served as co-leader, won the international Solar Decathlon Competition in Madrid, Spain. It was also recognized by the AIA with a national Institute Award for Excellence in Architecture, cited as one of the nation’s best works of architecture in 2012. Regionally, Dunay is a regular contributor to Architecture Exchange East and has served on the Design Committee, chaired the Honors Committee, and collaborated with others, winning the Virginia Prize for Design Research and Scholarship and six Awards of Excellence in Architecture.

For his unparalleled leadership, enduring support of the profession, and dedicated service to the community, AIA Virginia awards Robert J. Dunay, FAIA, the William C. Noland Medal.

M. Kirk Train Honored with Noland Medal


M. Kirk Train, FAIA
M. Kirk Train, FAIA

Kirk Train, FAIA, has been selected to receive the Society’s highest honor bestowed upon an architect: the William C. Noland Medal. Train will be acknowledged before his colleagues during the Annual Meeting of the Membership on Thursday, Nov. 6, at 1 p.m. in room E11b during Architecture Exchange East, and the Medal will be presented at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 7, at the Jefferson Hotel.

The award recognizes a lifetime of achievement for an individual architect. “In his integrity, character, service and commitment Kirk Train signifies for me that which is the best in our profession,” says Willard Scribner, FAIA. “His has been a thoughtful and principled voice advocating for an engaged profession, and leading by example.”

A gifted designer, Train and his firm have amassed a broad portfolio of award-winning designs over the past 25 years for projects throughout Virginia and the mid-Atlantic region. One client — another architect — noted that he designs simple things well. The rigor of the plan and the application of materials is beautifully resolved, and his work is both honest and straightforward, the embodiment of his belief that architecture dignifies our existence.

With decades of dedicated service to the community and as a champion of architectural causes that benefit humankind, his efforts have advocated for an engaged profession focused on public awareness, inspiration, and education. His long history of lending his expertise to make substantial contributions to the communities and citizens of Central Virginia includes serving as chair of the Albemarle County Board of Architectural Review and continued involvement in the Friends of the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library and the United Way Thomas Jefferson Area.

Emerging Leaders in Architecture inaugural session. From the left: Kirk Train, Bryan Green, Will Scribner, Jay Hugo, Brian Frickie
From the inaugural session of Emerging Leaders in Architecture. From the left: Kirk Train, Bryan Green, Will Scribner, Jay Hugo, Brian Frickie

The capstone of Train’s broad public engagement has been his role as a founding committee member for the Virginia Society’s Emerging Leaders in Architecture program. He played a pivotal role in establishing and leading this honors academy for young architects in Virginia, and it is through this program he believes his greatest impact will occur, as his passion for service and volunteerism will cultivate a new generation of Citizen Architects. “Acting with diplomacy and dignity, he is a true leader, one others have always wanted to follow throughout his career and in all spheres of influence,” says VSAIA Past President Brian J. Frickie, AIA. “We could not have a better advocate for the profession.”

Most notably, Train’s service to his fellow architects, and the profession as a whole, has been truly exemplary. He has worked tirelessly to strengthen the AIA at all levels, holding a variety of leadership positions in both local and state chapters including president of the VSAIA and president of the Central Virginia AIA chapter. Of particular note is his leadership in the Virginia Center for Architecture, serving as Chairman and working to raise the public’s awareness of good design through the establishment of the first architectural museum in the Southeast.

As a passionate leader and public servant whose efforts have yielded great benefits for his community, his fellow architects, and the greater society we serve, he has exemplified the profession’s highest ideals and created an enduring legacy. “Kirk’s extraordinary efforts to initiate collaborative projects within communities, his remarkable dedication to the AIA as the voice of the profession, and his steadfast belief that the architecture profession can meaningfully assist citizens in achieving a more balanced and wholesome life are, when considered collectively, attributes of the highest order for an architect,” says 2014 AIA President Helene Dreiling, FAIA.

For his unparalleled leadership, dedicated support of the profession, and service to the community, the Society awards M. Kirk Train, FAIA, the William C. Noland Medal.

Michel Ashe Honored with Noland Medal

Michel C. Ashe, FAIA, has been awarded the 2013 William C. Noland Medal
Michel C. Ashe, FAIA, has been awarded the 2013 William C. Noland Medal

Michel C. Ashe, FAIA, will receive the 2013 William C. Noland Medal. The medal is the Society’s highest honor bestowed upon one of its members and recognizes a lifetime of achievement for an architect. Ashe will be acknowledged before his colleagues during the Annual Meeting of the Membership on Thursday, Nov. 7, at 1 p.m. in room E11b during Architecture Exchange East, and the Medal will be presented at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8, at the Jefferson Hotel.

“For over four decades,” says former governor Tim Kaine, Hon. VSAIA, “Mike has dedicated him[self] to countless initiatives that have enabled him to convey the perspectives of an architect to [advance] the planning and development of Virginia.” Through award-winning design, dedicated service to his profession, and leadership in his community, he has exemplified the profession’s highest ideals and created an enduring legacy.

Serving in leadership positions in award-winning firms for more than 30 years, Ashe has demonstrated success in a broad and varied range of professional practice.  In addition, he has long been an advocate for excellence in fire-station design. Through an ongoing relationship and dialogue with the Virginia Fire Chief’s Association, he has developed a robust series of seminars and whitepapers championing the principle that these civic buildings should be a source of pride for their municipalities.

As a founding member and president of the Virginia Beach Central Business District Association, he helped create  innovative zoning ordinances which proved to be an invaluable tool for future development. His ongoing advocacy resulted in what is today the nationally recognized Town Center of Virginia Beach, helping to create more than 2,500 jobs. Decades after its founding, the CBDA is one of the largest and most active business associations in the state, and has become a model for other communities.

Ashe has a long history of providing leadership and support within the arts. He has committed countless hours to developing and delivering educational programming at institutions like the Chrysler Museum and Tidewater Community College. He was instrumental in the preservation of the historic Suffolk High School as well as its eventual transformation into the Suffolk Center for the Cultural Arts. In addition, he has helped to raise millions of dollars for local theaters and museums by leading public forums, outreach programs, telethons and other fundraising activities.

Most notably, his service to his fellow architects, and the profession as a whole, has been truly exemplary. He has worked tirelessly to strengthen the AIA at all levels and, in particular, our Virginia Society AIA. He has served in dozens of positions at the local, state and national levels of the AIA.  During his tenure on the National AIA Board of Directors and the Diversity Committee, he helped drive the development of several national initiatives to increase diversity within the AIA and the profession in general. He helped to establish the AIA’s “Shadow an Architect” program in 2007, which has since become an annual event.

For his unflagging commitment to the profession, and service to the community, the Society awards Michel C. Ashe, FAIA, the William C. Noland Medal.

Honors Awards Deadline Looms

medal-198x300The Virginia Society AIA Honors program is accepting nominations for Virginians who exemplify the profession’s highest ideals and who are committed to enriching the built environment. Nominations will be accepted through 5 p.m. on Friday, July, 19, 2013. Awards will be presented at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8.

Nominations must be submitted electronically as one PDF document, no larger than 20 pages and 50 MB. Nominations must be accompanied by the nomination form.

Nominations for all Virginia Society honors may be made by individual members, by chapter honors committees, by Society committees, or by the Board of Directors itself. Sitting Society board members and members of the Honors Committee are not eligible for Honors Awards.

AWARD CATEGORIES

The William C. Noland Medal, as the highest award bestowed on a member architect, is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, that spans a broad spectrum of the profession and that transcends the scope of normal professional activities. Only one medal may be bestowed each year.

The Architecture Medal for Virginia Service is the Society’s most prestigious public award, honoring an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of the built environment. Only one medal may be bestowed each year but may be given simultaneously to more than one person.

The T. David Fitz-Gibbon Virginia Architecture Firm Award, as the highest honor bestowed by the Virginia Society to a Virginia-based architecture firm, recognizes a firm that has consistently produced distinguished architecture for at least ten years.

The Award for Distinguished Achievement signals distinguished achievement by an architect in any one of the following categories: design, practice, education, service as “citizen architect” , and service to the profession; and thus may serve as an accolade for the work of an entire career or recognize the current accomplishments of a younger leader. Up to three awards may be bestowed each year.

Honorary Membership is bestowed upon a person of esteemed character who is not eligible for membership in the Virginia Society but who has rendered distinguished and exemplary service, over a sustained period of time, to architecture and the built environment within the domain of the Society.

Virginia Society Honors may be bestowed on non-member individuals or organizations that have inspired, influenced, or complemented the architecture profession in Virginia through practice of an allied profession, research, education, planning, legislation, architectural writing, the arts, or crafts. An individual who has previously been elected an Honorary Member of the Society is ineligible to receive Society Honors.

The Test of Time Award recognizes architectural design of enduring significance. The structure must be no less than 25 years old. Building use may change over time if the overall design is cherished as a significant contribution to the community and the built environment.

Questions? Contact Rhea George at rgeorge@aiava.org or (804) 237-1768

Noland Awarded to Helene Dreiling, FAIA

Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA
Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA

Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA, has been selected to receive the Society’s highest honor bestowed upon an architect — the William C. Noland Medal. She will be recognized during the Annual Meeting of the Membership at Architecture Exchange East on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, at 1 p.m. in room E11b. The Medal will be presented at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 9, at the Hotel John Marshall.

The award recognizes a lifetime of achievement for an individual architect. Her work to advance the profession, nurture emerging professionals, and elevate public awareness of the contributions architects make to the community, has benefitted thousands of individual architects and firms — not just in Virginia and the United States — but throughout the entire world. “Helene is without a doubt the most influential architect I know,” says colleague Timm Jamieson, FAIA. “She exemplifies what we all want to be in this profession … and we are each the better for [her] service.”

Dreiling has dedicated decades of service and leadership to the American Institute of Architects, culminating in her recent election as First Vice President/President-Elect.  She will serve as President of the AIA in 2014. The road to this position features a series of notable milestones, including her election as the first female president of AIA Blue Ridge and the first female Director of the Region of the Virginias. She was the first woman from AIA Blue Ridge, and youngest member in Virginia, to be elevated to the College of Fellows. These accomplishments serve as a beacon for those who follow in her footsteps. “Helene has done more than just to serve,” say former Institute secretaries Betsey and Brian Dougherty. “She has touched those people and those issues that she is passionate about and dedicated to, and has made each of us a better volunteer and a better professional through her sensitivity, insight and guidance.”

Throughout her service, Dreiling became one of the AIA’s most ardent and respected voices in support of emerging professionals and the benefits of lifelong learning.  Her work on a host of key task forces and committees not only helped streamline the AIA’s Continuing Education System, but also helped lead a shift towards a more seamless transition in education, training, and practice, by redefining the term “intern” and un-bundling the Architecture Registration Examination(ARE).

Her ongoing commitment to educating the broader public about the value of architects and good design began early in her career with her work at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Later, she was singularly responsible for curating Virginia Women in Architecture, a highly acclaimed exhibition spotlighting the work of Virginia’s female architects. This passion for educational outreach continued as she managed the Institute’s AIA150 celebration and oversaw the creation of the nationally-recognized America’s Favorite Architecture exhibition and website.   In her short time as the Executive Director of the Virginia Center for Architecture, she has helped shepherd the Center to a position of financial and programmatic strength. “All members of the profession in Virginia will benefit as the public develops a greater understanding of the power of architecture,” says VCA Trustee Ellen S. Cathy, AIA.

“Helene superbly exemplifies those personal qualities and life-altering achievements for which the Society’s William C. Noland Medal is designed to recognize and celebrate,” said Paul H. Barkley, FAIA. In making this award, the Society recognizes a career-long dedication to her fellow architects and the profession of architecture.

Honors Awards: Call for Nominations

Do you have a colleague that should be recognized for extraordinary work? The VSAIA Honors program is accepting nominations for Virginians who exemplify the professions highest ideals and who are committed to enriching the built environment.

In keeping with our commitment to sustainability, we are pleased to announce that the VSAIA Honors Awards program is continuing to use paperless submission! Use the handy nomination form found at on the Society Honors page to upload your nomination. We are accepting nominations, compiled into one PDF submission up to 50 MB.

If you have any questions, or if you are having trouble uploading your nomination, please contact rgeorge@aiava.org or (804) 644-3041, ext. 302. Nominations are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, July 20, 2012. To see the evaluative criteria, submission materials, and a list of past honorees, visit the Society Honors page and click the award name.

The submitter should be prepared to provide unrestricted high-resolution images to be used in connection with publicity of the program and the recognition of the honorees at Architecture Exchange East on Nov. 7–9, and at Visions for Architecture on Nov. 9.

The 2012 Virginia Society AIA Honors program is sponsored by:
Sustaining Sponsors
MTFA Architecture
Sharon C. Park, FAIA
The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company

Supporting Sponsors
Peyton Boyd, FAIA
Robert Boynton, FAIA
HVAC Inc. Building Solutions
RVA Construction

Honors Presented at Visions for Architecture 2011

The Virginia Society AIA Awards for Excellence in Architecture and the Society’s Honors Awards were presented at the 2011 Visions for Architecture gala at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts on Friday, Nov. 4, 2011.

Mary Cox Honored with Noland Medal

Mary Patton Cox, FAIA
Mary Patton Cox, FAIA

Mary Patton Cox, FAIA, has been selected to receive the Society’s highest honor bestowed upon an architect: the William C. Noland Medal. The award recognizes a lifetime of achievement for an individual architect, and 2011 marks the first time a woman is being recognized with the award. Cox will be celebrated during Architecture Exchange East at the Annual Meeting of the Membership on Thursday, Nov. 3, and the Medal will be presented at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 4, at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Cox’s 30-year career in architecture has been marked by notable accomplishments. “Mary Cox’s contribution to architectural practice has transcended the best the profession has to offer,” says one collaborator. “She has effectively extended the reach of thoughtful and responsive architecture to a very large community, both in terms of the substantial number and wide range of projects for which she has been responsible, and for her passionate and effective advocacy of architecture to a very large audience, including those who sponsor and use important public places.”

As University Architect, for the past 15 years Cox has led physical growth at Virginia Commonwealth University, overseeing more than 150 projects valued over $1 billion. A section of the city once described as “derelict and forlorn” has become a vibrant and cohesive urban campus with a distinctive sense of place. “VCU’s two campuses have been transformed under Mary’s sensitive and capable guidance,” said Grace E. Harris, Ph.D. “The University’s constellation of eclectic buildings has been knitted together to form true college campuses,” she continued.  Through her leadership, VCU has embraced the historic architectural character of its urban campus as well. “Words are inadequate to articulate all that Mary has done regarding preservation in an urban environment,” says Mary Jane Hogue, Executive Director of the Historic Richmond Foundation.  “Mary has strengthened our community,” she continued.

Cox has also worked diligently to support her colleagues in architecture. As the current Director of the Region of the Virginias on the National AIA Board, she serves on the AIA National Advocacy Outreach Committee and is identifying opportunities for architects to partner with mayors through the Mayors’ Institute for City Design.  She collaborated on a position paper outlining challenges and opportunities for architects to partner with their mayors as a way to advance excellence in city design and to carve out a role for architects in the policy-making arena. In addition to serving on the Government and Industry Affairs and Honors Committees, she has also served as the Society’s Intern Development Coordinator, Vice President for Government and Industry Affairs, Vice President for Advocacy, and President. In her role as a University Architect, she founded and chaired the Professional Practices Task Force for the Association of University Architects, which was later made a standing committee to provide information on best practices.

In the public arena, she has advocated for architects to ease the burden of state regulations and to advance the quality of the architectural practice environment in Virginia.  On multiple occasions, she successfully worked to defend the Virginia Public Procurement Act preserving qualifications-based selection. She improved the state’s review processes by meeting face to face with state agency representatives, and continues to work with the Division of Engineering and Building to make reviews more efficient and effective. “Her insights … allowed for the crafting of an approach that should not only smooth the process but also decrease costs,” said Director of the Department of General Services Rich Sliwoski, P.E., Hon. VSAIA.

For her sustained leadership, commitment to good design, and unwavering support of the profession, the Society awards Mary Patton Cox, FAIA, with the William C. Noland Medal.