Cox, Gordon, and Price Receive Awards for Distinguished Achievement

Al Cox, FAIA, Christopher Gordon, AIA, and Mel Price, AIA, will be recognized with the Award for Distinguished Achievement next month by AIA Virginia. The Award for Distinguished Achievement recognizes the accomplishments of one or more architects each year in design, practice, education, service as “citizen architect,” service to the profession, or initiatives to advance social justice, equity, diversity, or inclusion.

Al Cox, FAIA, retired in March after 28 years as Historic Preservation Manager for the City of Alexandria, which is home to no fewer than six National Register historic districts and nine African-American historic places containing dozens of significant and contributing structures. Cox conceived and implemented several processes to streamline development review and build consensus between city officials, architects, developers, and citizens. By building relationships with all stakeholders and encouraging constructive public participation in the regulatory process, he became respected as a fair-minded, effective mediator, guiding development teams to the most appropriate design solution and consistently pushing them to accomplish their best work.

It was Cox’s conviction that the city is a living, evolving organism and not a museum frozen in time. In that vein, he fostered many successful new infill projects in Alexandria as well as many thoughtful and sensitive adaptive reuse projects throughout the city’s 15 square miles. A passionate preservationist, he was also a proactive advocate for good design, regardless of style. His philosophy, education and private sector experience was grounded in historic preservation for its cultural, economic and environmental benefits without limiting creative, appropriate modern design alternatives. The role of City Architect and the design review processes created by Mr. Cox provides a model that can, and should, be repeated in local governments throughout the country.

Christopher Gordon, AIA, is a national leader who collaborates with developers and zoning authorities to create affordable housing that advances the vision of a diverse, inclusive, and sustainable community. His comprehensive approach from concept through crafting innovative strategies to obtain financing through the whole life-cycle of the building, itself, shapes the efficacy of high-performing and affordable solutions for people. Gordon transforms lives, and as a founding principal of KGD Architecture in 1995, he has directed his firm to award-winning success while remaining anchored in the needs of clients and communities.

Chris’ 2018 Columbia Hills project for Columbia Pike in Arlington is one of dozens of examples of his design leadership over the last quarter century. The $91 million, 330,000 square foot project consisting of 229 units for low-income families, recently won a ULI Washington Trends Award as a national case study that blends a novel hybrid financing model with an EarthCraft Platinum certification with a host of amenities that bring richness and community to one of the area’s largest apartment buildings. “Chris advances the profession of architecture resulting in lasting impact on society,” says Manoj Dalaya, FAIA, in his nominating letter, “and he is highly deserving of an Award for Distinguished Achievement.”

Mel Price, AIA, has spent nearly two decades building a strong reputation for designing and leading numerous successful projects at all scales. When Mel Price and her partner, Thom White, opened their Norfolk firm Work Program Architects in 2010, they also pushed a different sort of philosophy of firm management through transparency about finances and salaries, prioritizing collaboration and openness above all in projects, and reserving 10 percent of firm profits to cover pro-bono service. In short, Price built a practice worth emulating with an unrelenting focus on community.

Price has also built a practice that’s helping secure Norfolk’s future. Coastal resilience is an urgent challenge that will affect the lives of millions of Americans, 1.7 million of which live in the Hampton Roads region. By forging close ties to her home city, Mel and WPA have steered several projects to completion that are born of a focus on resilience, will help ensure a sustainable future, and will repair communities long derelict or suffering. The Elizabeth River Project’s Resilience Lab, the Elizabeth River Trail, government grants for the Ohio Creek Watershed encompassing Norfolk State University and the Chesterfield Heights neighborhood, OpenNorfolk, and the Selden Market are all prime examples of Price’s valuable contribution to the region.

The Awards will be presented at Visions for Architecture on Thursday, Oct. 8 in an online awards ceremony beginning at 4:30 p.m. The program is free but registration is required.

Call for Nominations: 2020 Honors Awards

Do you have a colleague who deserves recognition? Is there a firm that consistently produces incredible work? Is there a building that has captured your heart? Consider nominating them for AIA Virginia’s Honors Awards program.  

The Honors program recognizes the best efforts of Virginians who — by profession or avocation — have made creating, preserving, and enhancing Virginia’s communities an important life commitment.

Important note: The AIA Virginia board, at its April 2020 board meeting, revised the descriptions of the Virginia Emerging Professional Award and the Award for Distinguished Achievement to recognize individuals engaged in initiatives to advance social justice, equity, diversity, or inclusion. As you’re considering your nominees, please keep this in mind!

Nominations

Nominations must be submitted online. Nominations should be submitted as a single PDF up to 20 pages (not including letters of support) and no larger than 15 MB.

Nominations for all AIA Virginia honors may be made by individual members, by chapter honors committees, by AIA Virginia committees, or by the Board of Directors itself.

Current AIA Virginia Board members and Honors Committee members are not eligible for any award. Members of the Honors Committee may not be used as a reference or adviser or be solicited by the candidate or the candidate’s advisor.

The deadline is Wednesday, July 1, 2020 at 5 p.m.

Want an overview of the awards or some tips on putting together a successful nomination? Register for our webinar on June 3.


Eligibility

Eligibility criteria and submission requirements vary by award. Click on the awards listed below for additional details and to review past recipients.

Award Categories

The William C. Noland Medal, as the highest award bestowed on a member architect, is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, that spans a broad spectrum of the profession and that transcends the scope of normal professional activities. Only one medal may be bestowed each year.

The Architecture Medal for Virginia Service is AIA Virginia’s most prestigious public award, honoring an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of the built environment. Only one medal may be bestowed each year but may be given simultaneously to more than one person.

The T. David Fitz-Gibbon Virginia Architecture Firm Award, as the highest honor bestowed by AIA Virginia to a Virginia-based architecture firm, recognizes a firm that has consistently produced distinguished architecture for at least ten years.

The Virginia Emerging Professional Award recognizes the accomplishments of an emerging leader in Virginia for their contributions to the profession in any of the following: design, research, education, service as a “citizen architect,” service to the profession, service to the community, or initiatives to advance social justice, equity, diversity, or inclusion.

The Award for Distinguished Achievement recognizes either a singular achievement by an architect or the work of an entire career in any of the following: design, practice, education, service as a “citizen architect,” service to the profession, or initiatives to advance social justice, equity, diversity, or inclusion.

Honorary Membership is bestowed upon a person of esteemed character who is not eligible for membership in the AIA Virginia but who has rendered distinguished and exemplary service, over a sustained period of time, to architecture and the built environment within the domain of AIA Virginia.

AIA Virginia Honors may be bestowed on non-member individuals or organizations that have inspired, influenced, or complemented the architecture profession in Virginia through practice of an allied profession, research, education, planning, legislation, architectural writing, the arts, or crafts. An individual who has previously been elected an Honorary Member of AIA Virginia is ineligible to receive AIA Virginia Honors.

The Test of Time Award recognizes architectural design of enduring significance. The structure should be in Virginia and must be no less than 25 years old. Building use may change over time if the overall design is cherished as a significant contribution to the community and the built environment.

Siewers Lumber and Loudoun Design Cabinet Recognized with AIA Virginia Honors

Richmond-based Siewers Lumber & Millwork and the Loudoun County Department of Economic Development’s Design Cabinet will be recognized with AIA Virginia Honors at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, at the Hilton Downtown Richmond. AIA Virginia Honors may be bestowed on non-member individuals or organizations that have inspired, influenced, or complemented the architecture profession in Virginia through practice of an allied profession, research, education, planning, legislation, architectural writing, the arts, or crafts.

For nearly 135 years, Virginia’s architects have relied upon Siewers Lumber and Millwork to help realize their designs. The company has reliably offered a vast array of historical wood trim patterns, in-house woodworkers, and expert craftspeople to help develop custom solutions for even the most sensitive restoration projects. Their ongoing commitment to offering high-quality educational opportunities to the industry not only serves the profession’s current needs, but anticipates them moving forward. For those in the design profession and construction trades — particularly those who work in the fields of restoration and historic preservation — Siewers has been an invaluable partner for generations.

In 2003, the Loudoun County Design Cabinet was formed through the county’s Department of Economic Development to help promote high-quality, environmentally sustainable, and culturally respectful architectural and landscape design in one of the fastest-growing communities in the Commonwealth. In addition to their awards program and design charrettes, the Design Cabinet is asked regularly to collaborate on a variety of issues, such as streetscape improvement, campus planning, sustainable design, and modifications to the County Zoning Ordinance. What started as a bold and unique experiment nearly twenty years ago to determine whether design professionals could effectively “work with their communities rather than for their communities,” has become the new standard within Loudoun County and a model for communities nationwide.

Tickets to Visions for Architecture are available online.

First Unitarian Universalist Church in Richmond Recognized with Test of Time Award

The First Unitarian Universalist Church (UUC) has been selected to receive AIA Virginia’s Test of Time Award in 2019. The award recognizes a structure at least 25 years old (but no more than 50) from the date of initial construction. Building use may change over time if the overall design is cherished as a significant contribution to the community and the built environment. The award will be presented at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, at the Hilton Downtown Richmond.

UUC was designed by Ulrich Franzen, a German-born graduate of the Harvard School of Design. Built in 1972, the design reflects Louis I. Kahn’s influence, simultaneously complementing and distinguishing itself from its more traditional setting in Richmond’s Carillon Historic District.

Comprised of interlocking blocks of scored concrete and glass, the building proudly displays the how it was assembled, conveying a sense of honest purpose. The strong, solid massing, formal repetition, and simple materials give it a grounded sense of place and permanence on its prominent site.

The building frames shaded outdoor spaces for quiet contemplation but also opens up views to the garden through floor to ceiling glass, bringing a sense of peace and serenity to the meeting hall inside.

In 2002 and 2012, respectful renovations were completed by Quinn Evans Architects.

Called a “timeless work of abstract geometry,” the UUC has admirably met the changing needs of the Unitarian congregation with only modest renovations throughout its 47 year history.

Drake, Hogan, and McKinley Honored with Emerging Professional Award

April Drake, Emily Hogan, and Andrew McKinley will be recognized with the Virginia Emerging Professional Award at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, at the Hilton Downtown Richmond. Launched in 2015, the Virginia Emerging Professional Award is intended to recognize the accomplishments of emerging leaders in Virginia for their contributions to the profession in one or more of the following categories: design, research, education, or discourse; service to the profession; mentorship; or service to the community.

“In the midst of challenging projects, she never loses sight of her top priority: building up the next generation of architects, while delivering to them and future generations a profession that values equity and inclusion.”

-Jessica Anderson, PE and Jonathan Oswald, AIA with HDR
April Drake, AIA

Throughout her 15 year career, April C. Drake, AIA, has been a dedicated leader in the profession. She has been a passionate advocate for underrepresented voices and committed to building a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive profession. She regularly attends, plans, and presents at local, regional, and national events, highlighting the achievements of women and minorities in architecture.

In addition to her role as a senior project architect with HDR, Drake currently serves on the AIA Northern Virginia Board of Directors and is the past chair of the Women in Architecture (WIA) committee. As a WIA leader, she championed her own innovative STEM event for local Girl Scout troops and focused her efforts on introducing school-aged girls to the field of architecture.

But, her service to the profession isn’t limited to the AIA — since 2014, she has helped NCARB navigate the transition from ARE 4.0 to ARE 5.0 through involvement on a Mapping Task Force and development of case studies for the exam. For the past two years, she has served on the NCARB Examination Committee which oversees development of several subcommittees and task forces and is a thought leader for NCARB regarding licensure assessment both now and into the future.

Her contributions to the profession, service to the community, mentorship of others, and efforts to engage students will have an indelible impact on the profession in the Commonwealth and beyond.

“As an architect, Emily Hogan represents her profession’s best qualities. She demonstrates an artistic creativity combined with a thoroughness and a keen eye for detail, whether engaging and guiding stakeholders through discovery, translation, and implementation phases successfully or in the role of advocate.”

–Andrew Pearson, Director of the Library, Bridgewater College
Emily Hogan, AIA

An award-winning architect with Quinn Evans Architects, Emily Hogan, AIA, has distinguished herself not only through her work, but also through exemplary service to the profession, her community, and to others. She has immersed herself in supporting the design community after graduating from the Emerging Leaders in Architecture program in 2014. She served as the AIA Richmond Treasurer and has been an active member of Richmond Women in Design, helping to coordinate some of the chapter’s largest events and programs. In 2017, she was recognized for her service with the Richard L. Ford Award for Young Architects. She has also exhibited a dedication to mentoring the next generation of leaders, organizing and hosting tours for students and young professionals.

In addition to her service to the profession, she has been a committed volunteer in her community — from supporting Dress for Success, to serving as campaign leader for the United Way, to serving on the Museum District Association, to being a part of service projects through Hill City Church— she has made service a genuine part of her identity.

“Andy’s design talents and technical knowledge have significantly impacted the quality of buildings for his clients and local communities.”

– Scott M. Campbell, AIA
Andrew McKinley, AIA

Andrew McKinley, AIA, a principal with VIA design architects, has been a leader in design, sustainability, and mentorship throughout his career.

As co-chair of the membership committee for AIA Hampton Roads, he championed and helped lead the AIA Hampton Roads “Let’s Talk” firm discussion series with the goal of building relationships with all architecture firms — not just those who are actively engage with the AIA. A dedicated mentor, he has organized a number of Shadow Day programs to provide high school and college students the opportunity to spend a day at a local design firm. In 2018 alone, more than 60 students were paired with local firms, introducing them to the profession and helping them understand the impact a project can have on a community. He has also hosted Hampton University students for the “Firm Forward” program, giving them a glimpse into various firms’ operations. A graduate of the Emerging Leaders in Architecture program, he has committed to giving back to the profession by serving on the local steering committee. He also served on the York County Board of Zoning Appeals between 2010 and 2014.

McKinley has a passion for sustainable architecture and design for local public entities. He has been diligent in researching and understanding the positive impact that passive strategies an innovative technologies can have on the sustainability of our collective future. Moreover, he has committed to sharing his expertise with his peers. Within his firm, he launched a sustainability committee. Outside of it, he has presented a case study before the USGBC chapter and has focused on helping owners and builders understand how sustainable design reduces building operating and maintenance cost.

3north Wins Firm Award for 2019

The T. David Fitz-Gibbon Firm Award will be presented to 3north at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, at the Hilton Downtown Richmond. As the highest honor bestowed by the AIA Virginia to a Virginia-based architecture firm, the Fitz-Gibbon Architecture Firm Award recognizes a firm that has consistently produced distinguished architecture for at least ten years.

“I can say without reservation that 3north’s body of work rivals that of any of the top national design firms whose work I’ve observed at first hand. I cannot give them higher praise than to say that, as a knowledgeable client, I would place 3north in the top tier of any short list”

Samuel A. Anderson, III, FAIA

Since its founding in 1999, 3north has grown from a single architect to a multidisciplinary design firm with offices in Richmond and San Francisco. Their diverse portfolio of work — which includes hospitality, civic, commercial, educational, and residential projects — has earned awards and recognition for achievements in design excellence, environmental sustainability, and historic preservation.

The firm is deeply committed to supporting community nonprofits and has created an office culture that encourages pro bono work, broad-based volunteerism, board service, and speaking engagements. Beyond their community involvement, the firm’s principals and staff have a long history of service to the AIA and the profession. Through support of programming like AIA Richmond’s Front Porch and Richmond Women in Design, to engagement with AIA Virginia in the Emerging Leaders in Architecture program, the Art of Practice, and Architecture Exchange East, to service at the national level through the Small Firm Exchange, 3north has been a model for service to the profession.

In addition to cultivating a culture of service, the firm has nurtured an entrepreneurial spirit, founding several affiliate businesses and holding a number of patents pending.

Noland Medal Awarded to Bob Moje in 2019

A founding principal of VMDO Architects, Robert W. Moje, FAIA, will be recognized with the William C. Noland Medal at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, at the Hilton Downtown Richmond. As the highest honor bestowed by AIA Virginia to an architect, the Noland Medal is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, spanning a broad spectrum of the profession, and transcending the scope of normal professional activities. The honor is in memory of William C. Noland, FAIA, one of the founders of the AIA in Virginia, its second president, and Virginia’s first member to be elevated to fellowship.

“Bob’s work in architecture is framed by three essential, interrelated commitments: a commitment to the discipline and practice as a public, civic endeavor; a commitment therefore to the communities in which he is called to work; and further, a specific commitment to education as both the fundamental design commission and the fundamental societal value … [his] design vision and leadership is purposeful, utterly authentic, and deeply holistic.”

Peter MacKeith, Dean and Professor, University of Arkansas

Moje has been a leader in the planning and design of educational facilities for more than 42 years. Through his award-winning designs, research, and professional and public service, he has advanced the practice of educational facility design considerably. His innovative instructional environments have elevated the level of discourse on design, teaching, learning, and the communal aspect of educational facilities on an international scale. In 2014, he served as chair for the global AIA Committee on Architecture for Education (CAE) conference titled The Value of Design: Enhancing Education through Architecture in Barcelona, Spain.

A regular juror for awards programs, including the national CAE Design Awards, he supports innovative work through the recognition of design solutions that enhance learning. He has also collaborated with the National Institutes of Health, the University of Nebraska Medical Center, the University of Virginia School of Medicine, and the Green Schools National Network to study the environmental effects of school buildings on children’s health and happiness. In addition to receiving the 2012 Prize for Design Research and Scholarship from the AIA Virginia, he partnered with the U.S. Green Building Council to develop a LEED Credit for school buildings that contribute to the physical fitness and health of thier occupants.

Moje has a long history of service to his profession and his community. Since 1997 he has served as the only architect on the Commonwealth of Virginia Joint House/Senate Subcommittee on Educational Infrastructure. He has also contributed his time on the Charlottesville Board of Architecture review, including a stint as chair, the Virginia Computer Foundation, the Virginia Center for Architecture, and numerous others.  

Beyond his design and research accomplishments, he has been an exemplary leader at VMDO. He helped establish a firm culture that is people-oriented, family-friendly, and inclusive of different viewpoints, backgrounds, and experience levels. He has contributed an effective transition plan and a generous profit-sharing system that is available to all at the firm.

Dalaya Recognized at Visions 2018

Manoj Dalaya honored with the Award for Distinguished Achievement at Visions for Architecture on Nov. 9, 2018.

Reggie Jones Selected to Receive the Architecture Medal for Virginia Service

Reggie Jones, Partner at Williams Mullen, will be recognized with the Architecture Medal for Virginia Service at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 9, 2017, at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The Architecture Medal for Virginia Service is AIA Virginia’s most prestigious public award, honoring an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of the built environment.

Jones’ decades of support for the profession of architecture and its practitioners coupled with his tireless efforts to protect Qualifications Based Selection in the Commonwealth has protected the health, safety, and welfare of generations of citizens and has served as a model nationwide. Jones helped shepherd the adoption of the Virginia Public Procurement Act based on the Brooks Act and has proven a tireless advocate for QBS for professional services. Jones is an invaluable resource on legislative matters extending beyond his scope of services.

Jones has more than 40 years of legal experience representing clients before the Virginia General Assembly and the agencies of state government. His practice specializes in government relations, health care, professions, technology, financial institutions and energy. Active in a number of business, community and civic organizations, he was a founding member of the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation’s board of directors and has served since 2006.