Archive | Professional Development News

Francis Kéré announced as ArchEx Keynote Speaker

 


AIA Virginia is excited to announce that Francis Kere, Hon. FAIA, will be our 2018 ArchEx Keynote Speaker. Known for deftly balancing the tension between traditional building practices and innovation,Kere is an award-winning architect based in Berlin. He’s a well-known TED presenter and was a keynote speaker at the national convention in 2017, earning rave reviews.

He’s founder and principal of Kéré Architecture. Born in the village of Gando in Burkina Faso, he was the first child in his village to be sent to school. Since becoming an architect, he has designed internationally recognized projects in Burkina Faso, MaliYemen and China, including the widely celebrated 2017 Serpentine Pavilion. He is a tenured professor at Harvard University and founder of the Kéré Foundation.

 

From the physical tension, to spatial tension, to the tension between creative vision and practical restrictions, design is about finding the ideal balance between opposing forces. At Architecture Exchange East 2018, we’ll be exploring how tension can make – or break – design.

We hope to see you on Nov. 7-9, 2018 at ArchEx.

Posted in Featured, Professional Development News

Meet the Emerging Leaders Class of 2018

AIA Virginia’s award-winning Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) program was developed to jump-start the careers of young professionals. Conceived of and lead by a passionate steering committee of successful architects, the program was designed to share the things they wished they had learned in architecture school.

Each of the seven day-long-sessions focuses on developing essential skills like financial management, communication and negotiation, advocacy and public service, and much more.

Want to be a member of this elite group of leaders? The application for the 2019 class will be available later this summer. Contact Corey Clayborne for information on how to nominate an emerging leader or with any questions about the program.

We asked members of the ELA class of 2018 the same five questions, here are their inspiring answers.

Amber Hall

Amber Hall

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Sagrada Familia in Barcelona actually brought tears to my eyes. It was the first time I ever experienced that type of emotional response to architecture. I will never forget the magnificence of standing inside that spiritual space.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso, for inspiration. Yes Please by Amy Poehler, for fun.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I have 3 younger brothers, so needless to say, my life was full of Legos and action figures. I always insisted on “making houses” for their play figures to live in. I would build elaborate floor plans that would span between our bedrooms, down the hall, into the bathroom… Hours later when I was all done, they had already lost interest! (haha)

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A; Essential oils diffuser, tea, and Netflix.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Be present in the work you do. Right here, right now–the job you’re in, the city you reside in, the people you surround yourself with all contribute to your career, your future and yourself. In a few years, you will look back and think “I’m proud of how far I’ve come!”

April Pilcher

April Pilcher

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I recently visited the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. I really enjoyed looking up to see the layers of the facade and envelope as you enter the building, which becomes visible again as you peer out apertures on the upper floors. The exhibits themselves are also very well done. I definitely recommend making a visit.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: As a child, I used to draw plans for different dream houses, but I never knew what “architecture” was. When I got to college, I chose to major in architecture knowing very little about the profession. However, the more I learned about design, the more I wanted to learn, and the more passionate I became about pursuing good design. I’ve been really lucky to have discovered my passion in such a way.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: I like to read a book, especially pool-side or beach-side on a nice day!

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Don’t be afraid of failure. Very few things are great the first time. Try again and again and again.

Ian Vaughan

Ian Vaughan

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I recently had the opportunity to spend some time in Washington D.C. and tour the three buildings that make up the Library of Congress. It was very inspiring. You could feel the knowledge and power just by walking into the space of the main reading room.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The last book I read was Art Activism. It’s a collection of artwork, poems, and essays by author: artist Aaron Maybin. Maybin is a former professional athlete who decided to use his platform to challenge social justice issues through his art and activism efforts within the City of Baltimore.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: It started at a very young age when I would draw buildings and build things with my Legos. Architecture has always been something I wanted to do and my passion for it grows as I get older.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: I don’t get much time to relax, but I do enjoy trying new recipes and reading to my two young daughters.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Maintain your curiosity of architecture, and get a better understanding of the community you live in. Talk to other people who are not in the industry to challenge your ideas on architecture.

Jacob Combee

Jacob Combee

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: The most memorable building I’ve been to is the Fisher House by Louis Kahn. It’s not a large house, but it is so well designed for the purpose of living. In terms of a strong reaction, all of these modern Wendy’s restaurants are something. It’s interesting that some of the most modern and boundary-pushing buildings are now fast food chains…

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: I read a lot of graphic design books and just finished Grid Systems in Graphic Design. I’m currently in the middle of a book called Rich Dad, Poor Dad about financials and business.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I had a knack for organizing and finding a place for everything, and I’ve always been interested in how things work. Architecture is organizing and learning how things work, with the twist of doing it beautifully.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: I like to go on a run or tune in to an interesting documentary.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Make Mistakes Faster. I think that was hung up in one of the first year studios at school and it stuck with me. It’s totally fine to mess something up, that’s the best way to learn but do it quickly so there is time to correct the mistake.

Jameel Tomlinson

Jameel Tomlinson

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Recently I learned about the 7 House by David Adjaye and was impressed by his approach to this infill project and use of black concrete.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Managing Your Day to Day: Build Your Routine, Find Your Focus & Sharpen Your Creative Mind

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Through traveling and visiting different cities. This allowed me to begin to understand the sense of place and initiated my desire to create positive environments for people who don’t have the opportunity to experience good architecture.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Spend time at the beach but when that’s not available I like to go to the park and spend time with friends.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Be dedicated and studious and understand that architecture is a life-long learning process. Understand your why or the reason you want to be an architect so that you can be focused and driven to produce work you’re proud of.

Kalee Hartman

Kalee Hartman

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I’m really intrigued with historic hotels– the architecture of the buildings and the people who stayed at them. My job has allowed me to work on projects at the Jefferson Hotel and Pinehurst Resort. I could spend hours going through old floors plans and images to see how the spaces and styles have changed over the course of time.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The ARE 5.0 Review Manual

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Ever since childhood I’ve always said I wanted to be an architect.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Draw, paint or anything creative that doesn’t require sitting in front of a computer.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Ask questions and stay curious!

Keith Murphy

Keith Murphy

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: The Nathan-Russell House in Charleston, South Carolina. It was built in 1808 and the level of detail an craftsmanship throughout is impressive, however, what was truly most impressive to see was the sweeping 2-story elliptical stair which floats off the wall seemingly without support. To think that they were able to construct something like that nearly 200 years ago using only wood and plaster knowing the structural feats we often go through today to achieve a similar result using steel and all our modern methods were inspiring and impressive to see.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I have always had a love of buildings since I was young. I used to love looking at the old castles and houses in England and other parts of Europe and would study books on then and other houses in this country obsessively. Additionally, my mom designed the house I grew up in and I used to sit with her as she sketched and would go with her as she picked out materials etc and would visit the house as it was being built. Being exposed to all of that at a young age certainly helped spur my interest further. Ever since a young age all I wanted to study and do when I became an adult was design buildings – particularly houses, which is something I’m fortunate enough to be able to focus on in my current job.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: When I’m able to one of the most relaxing things in my mind is to get out to the country on the river or go out on the boat – anything on the water. I’ve also always loved horses and riding since I was little and find the connection experienced with the horse and nature when out for a ride can be extremely relaxing and make you forget other concerns for at least a short time.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Don’t let professors in college deter you if it’s something you really want to do. For every truly inspirational professor, you have there will be those that will deter you because you differ in stylistic preferences or their desire for everything to be so hyper conceptual it lacks a grounding in the real world. For me, I found such hyper conceptuality a turnoff and something that did not inspire me, however, there is value in what it teaches in the ability to think outside the box. The is also often a common theme that I came across that “if you’re in it for money architecture is the place to be” and while that is true in some regards I was always told growing up that if you follow you’re passions success will follow as well.

Kimberly Jusczak

Kimberly Jusczak

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I’ve been looking at Renzo Piano’s Rue de Meaux; the facade proportions are simple and elegant. It’s inspiring my current project.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Does proofreading my thesis documentation count?

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I think I am continuously discovering my passion for architecture, whether in the detail of a project I am working on or by something I experience on my commute work.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Anything involving sunshine and the beach, there is just something about salt air.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: My advice would be to try everything. Use your internships to try out a variety of firm and project types, and then find your niche – find what it is about architecture that excites you the most.

Laura Green

Laura Green

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I recently saw Ascent at Roebling’s Bridge by Daniel Libeskind. I’ve seen this building many times since its construction. It reminds me how exciting architecture is and how a building can truly affect people.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I always liked math and being creative. I looked into several potential careers, but after touring VT’s architecture school, I just knew it was what I’d been searching for.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: I enjoy sitting out by the pool with a good book.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Don’t forget to add a bit of yourself to each of your projects. That is what makes a building, architecture.

Michael Peterson

Michael Peterson

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: The Taipei 101 building in Taipei, Taiwan. What amazes me about the building is less so the building itself, but instead the implications politically the building had and has had since it’s inception. Not only was it a record-setting achievement on both the local and global level architecturally, but influenced a political shift in the region surrounding Taiwan and its geopolitical and economic presence.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School by Matthew Frederick

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I would use almost anything and everything around to build “towers.” Wooden blocks were the go-to for building a tower – which would be followed by a controlled demolition brought on by catapults, trebuchets, and launchers of all kinds in a fantastic siege to pinpoint the weakest elements of the towers.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Right now it would be playing around with Virtual Reality and 3D Printing knick-knacks from the internet to give to my friends so I appear cooler than I really am.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Invest in yourself.  Find hobbies or activities that you find enjoyable that feedback into yourself productively.  Buy that camera, spend those extra few minutes to watch one more tutorial, go to that conference, buy or do that thing that builds up a skill or ability that makes you, you.  It will pay for itself, and dividends if you invest in yourself and do what you enjoy.

Nancy Redenius

Nancy Redenius

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Notre Dame du Raincy, a modernist church with a material palette of concrete and stained glass. I found it to be a wonderful study of color and composition.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Old Path, White Clouds by Thich Nhat Hanh, a narrative recounting of the life and teachings of Gautama Buddha. On the design front, I am just starting Rudolf Arnheim’s The Power of the Center: A Study of Composition in the Visual Arts.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Traveling from a young age exposed me to a variety of built environments and contributed to my interest in the relationship between people, culture, and architecture. I always knew I wanted a career that could have a positive impact on people’s lives, and I believe that good architecture has the power to positively impact the lives of its users.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Spending time with friends, ideally outdoors.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Align your work with your values and set yourself up to do work in which you find purpose.

Noah Bolton

Noah Bolton

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Massimo Carmassi – Reconstruction of San Michele, Borgo Pisa. While doing research for a project we are currently designing in our office I came across this project and was very taken by Carmassi’s ability to balance his new intervention with the weight of the historical building. His use of masonry and the carved out sculptural spaces are particularly beautiful in how they interact with light and frame views back to the existing context.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: While studying Industrial Design at Pratt Institute I was turned onto Samuel Mockbee and the work done at the Rural Studio. I was inspired by the idea of using design as a way of providing a service to those who design may not normally serve. In addition, I was excited by the spirit of the work and the use of inexpensive materials to achieve simple/beautiful results.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Fly fishing and gardening (when not wrangling my two boys)

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Build physical things, make stuff, and explore materials with your hands. Understanding how things are built and how materials are transformed and put together will make you a better architect – and its fun.

Rick Fischl

Rick Fischl

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I had not been to DC for pleasure in several years since I left my job there to come work in Richmond, but when I lived in DC I always loved the Hirshhorn and thought it was an underrated modern piece of architecture. I visited again just a few weeks ago though, and my appreciation for the building was re-ignited and still love it for what it is – a humble, modern, and honest building with an inherent marriage between form, materiality, and structure.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Thinking Architecture by Peter Zumthor, probably for the 9th time as it’s become an annual ritual for me ever since I read it the first time. Zumthor’s words and stories are poetry to me, and every time I read it my passion is reignited and it reminds me why I do what I do, especially when the day-to-day can get tough.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I wanted to be an architect since I was 7 as I loved art and construction as a kid, but it wasn’t until I visited Belvedere Gardens in Salem as a student at Virginia Tech where my love for architecture was confirmed as I felt as though I truly understood the power of design to uplift the human spirit for the first time, and what the built environment can do to make a positive impact in the world at a range of scales.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: When I find free time, just about anything with my wife. We’ve come to love enjoying the outdoors together and find ourselves hiking, biking, and stand-up paddle boarding these days to unwind. We’ve also both been getting really into cooking together this year as well.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Love what you do. Design is not a job, it’s a lifestyle, and if you don’t love it you’ll have a long and unrewarding career. If you love it you can make great things, teach others to find their passion, and better the community around you. Besides, it’s too much fun not to love.

Terry Lynn Wolfe

Terri Lynn Wolfe

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Center in the Square in downtown Roanoke. This is one of my favorite buildings in Roanoke because it serves as a landmark and central hub for activity in downtown. I also really enjoy this building because the firm that I currently work for, Spectrum Design, did the revamped renovations for this building. Whenever I have family or friends come to town to visit, I always take them in this building and up to the rooftop to see the great view of downtown and surrounding mountains. I love hearing other people talk about how much they love this building and like going to events here- it has certainly had a positive impact on the community and downtown Roanoke!

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The Image of the City by Kevin Lynch.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Growing up, I was always on the more creative side. I found joy in building things out of sticks and stones from my backyard and also playing with Legos and Lincoln Logs. I also used to sit in from of the TV and sketch the characters in cartoon shows. Starting as a high school Freshman, I took my first drafting course- and yes, actual hand drafting. I continued to take more drafting courses every semester until I graduated high school and decided to go on and pursue a career in architecture.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: This isn’t necessarily relaxing (not at all actually) but my favorite thing to do outside of work/architecture is CrossFit. I really enjoy pushing myself physically, getting stronger and competing. It has certainly become a hobby of mine!

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Don’t be afraid to ask questions and always try to collaborate with your peers! Be an observer as well as a go-getter. Learn as much as you can from those that you look up to and always try to apply what you’ve learned. Only being a year out of school, I have already learned so much from my co-workers and continue to learn something new every day.

Tyler Jenkins

Tyler Jenkins

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Not a building, however an entire city. A trip to Charleston, South Carolina reminded me why I fell in love with architecture.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The Ballast ARE book as I am in the middle of taking my exams.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Growing up in Central Virginia, our class trips frequented some of the great historic homes of the area. I discovered my passion for architecture through these early site visits and dreamed of what I could create one day when I became an architect.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Being outside working in the garden, helping out on the farm and spending time with friends and family.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Always be open to new ideas and avoid becoming set in your ways. Travel the world to see new things and spend time outside of the office environment are great ways to make sure this happens.

Posted in Professional Development News

Call for Volunteers: ArchEx 2018

Photo by Jay Paul.

We’re seeking a limited number of individuals to serve as volunteers at Architecture Exchange East 2018. In gratitude for their service, volunteers are invited to attend ArchEx for free on the day(s) you help out.

We are looking for volunteers who are capable of completing a number of different tasks throughout the conference. Volunteers are expected to commit to a minimum of one full day in order to receive the complimentary conference registration. Volunteer positions are open to all AIA Virginia members or students at Virginia’s accredited schools of architecture.

While we try to accommodate all requests, volunteers are assigned to positions where we have the need. (Volunteers must fulfill their entire commitment to receive complimentary conference registration.)

If you are interested, please complete the Volunteer Interest Form. We’ll be in touch later to confirm the details of your participation.

Posted in Professional Development News

Schulhof Announced as Design Awards Jury Chair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2018 Design Awards close on June 28!!! Enter today>>

Paul Schulhof will chair the jury of the 2018 AIA Virginia Awards for Excellence in Architecture. Also known as the Design Awards, the program recognizes outstanding design, built and unbuilt, from the past eight years and is juried by a team of esteemed practitioners. For 2018 there are five categories in the Awards for Excellence: Architecture, Historic Preservation, Interiors, Contextual Design, and Residential Design.

©Taylor Jewell

Paul Schulhof is a partner at the architecture firm of Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects | Partners (TWBTA). He joined TWBTA in 1999 and became the third partner in the practice in 2013. TWBTA is located in New York City and provides architectural, master planning, and interior design services for civic, institutional, educational, and private clients in the United States and abroad. TWBTA has won numerous awards including the National AIA Firm Award in 2013.

Paul has overseen a wide range of projects at TWBTA including the Obama Presidential Center in Chicago, the US Embassy in Mexico City, a technology campus for TATA Consultancy Services in India, the expansion of the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City, a dormitory for Haverford College, and an award-winning house on Long Island.

Before joining TWBTA, Paul was an architect at Weiss/Manfredi Architects and at Beyer Blinder Belle Architects and Planners where he worked on the restoration of New York’s Grand Central Terminal. He received his Bachelor of Science from Cornell University and Master of Architecture from the University of Virginia. Paul has taught graduate-level architecture studios at Yale University and served as a guest critic at multiple institutions.

Read the fine print or submit an entry>>

Posted in Featured, Professional Development News

ELA Class Off And Running

The 2018 Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) program has completed their fourth session of the year and it is shaping up to be a great year!

The April session was titled Practicing Professionalism and focused on the esteemed role of the architect as a pillar of the community that is looked to for leadership by many stakeholders. StrengthFinders certified coach, Kahtra Kayton, worked with the class to review their CliftonStrengths. Class participants learned more about their own strengths, shared it with the group, and then discussed how these attributes could best elevate the group’s performance on the class project. Next, Missy Rand conducted a dynamic session entitled Ethics and Standards of Practice. During this component, the class split into groups to role-play and discuss real-world examples of scenarios that firm leaders may face.  Alison Mullins, Esq. led off the afternoon with her engaging and laugh-producing presentation At the Crossroads of Contracts, Construction Documents, and Licensing Obligations. A topic normally considered mundane by many was presented in an attention captivating way that taught the class key points in risk management.  The session concluded with Paul Beckman’s Building Codes, which covered best practices in permitting and document review processes during the various design phases.

The group continues to advance with the class project. The next session will take place in Richmond on May 11.

Special thanks go out to the sponsors of the 2018 ELA program and to all who contribute in any capacity to make the program a success.

ELA Program Sponsors:

Patron ($1,500 – $1,999)
Moseley Architects

Sustaining ($1,000 – $1,499)
Hampton University

Supporter ($500 – $999)
SMBW
VMDO Architects
AIA Central Virginia

Contributor ($1 – $499)
Alloy Architecture & Construction
Clifton Tiller, AIA
2Plys
Jacobs
NFM Lending
Maya Restaurant

Posted in Professional Development News

Reflections: Design Forum XIII

BLUR: The Shifting Boundaries between Art, Technology, and Architecture… and why they matter for the practice of the future.

Virginia Design Forum XIII | April 6-7, 2018 | Taubman Museum of Art

By Ed Ford, AIA

It was, as Michael Gibson reminded us, the thirteenth such occasion since the first Design Forum held in Hot Springs in 1994, a series of events that has brought us a widely diverse group of presenters in its 24-year history. This year’s theme was BLUR, in this case the blurring of boundaries between disciplines. At a time when art’s traditional connection to architecture seems to be waning in some quarters, it gratifying to see it was very much alive in the work presented in Roanoke. Jack Davis’s Introduction elaborated on the theme by reminding us of an old argument — Richards Serra’s contention that architecture can never be art and Harry Seidler’s belief that it cannot be anything else. All of this year’s presenters are involved in redefining, erasing and transgressing the definitions of and boundaries of architecture, art, design and science — of those things which we call disciplines, which as Jack defined them, are those things that require craft, skill, and philosophy.

An important connection was made later in the program by Doris Kim Sung who reminded us that as Maurice Merleau-Ponty said, we learn through experience and not intellect, and the interplay of the perceptual and the “real” was a repeating theme over the course of the Forum. Much of the work dealt with creative tensions between real space and perceived space or the idea of space at all. But while much of the work both in ideological origin and execution is both driven and inspired by the current acceleration of technological change, many saw their work growing out of longstanding art traditions that they were extending into the digital realm. Many presenters began their careers in other disciplines, often traditional ones, whose outlook had informed their architectural work. Space and form defined by light was a common theme, but at the same time, some of the most compelling projects were made from traditional materials and the work presented ranged from forms of pure light to meticulously joined wood to apparently jointless masonry structures.

 

Eric Howeler

Eric Höweler, AIA, of Höweler + Yoon Architecture, Harvard GSD

Eric Höweler in his keynote explained that he sees his firm as working across media — trespassing and bootlegging — defining architecture in the broadest of media. Much of their work deals with public space but Eric notes, “the notion of public and private has been fundamentally altered by a technologically expanded sense of commons that extends across media formats and channels,” Times Square being an obvious example.

Their most interactive project and least conventional in terms of the traditional tools of architecture is probably “Swing Time,” an interactive playscape in a park near the Boston Convention Center that takes the classic park swing into new territory. It is composed of twenty illuminated ring-shaped swings, large circular halos made of welded polypropylene with internal LED lighting controllers that change the illumination depending on the frequency and intensity of their movement. When stationary they emit a soft constant light. When the swings are moving the colors change from color and increase in intensity.

At the same time, some of their most compelling projects proved to be the least digital, such as a reinterpretation of the Chinese courtyard typology-the Skycourts housing and office complex in Chengdu, China, and the beautifully contrasting Corten and stone walls of the exterior.

The Collier Memorial is also executed in more conventional architecture materials but used in a technologiacally innovative way. The Memorial marks the site on MIT’s campus where a police officer was killed in the aftermath of the 2013 Marathon bombing. The Memorial, formed by a series of interlocking walls, takes the form of both a star and an open hand embodying the concept of “strength through unity.” It is composed of thirty-two blocks of granite that form a five-way stone vault. Each block supports the other to create a covered space.  A mortarless, zero-tolerance stone structure, it requires the perfect joinery of thirty-two stone blocks to transfer loads in pure compression from stone to stone.

 

Doris Kim Sung

Doris Kim Sung, dO|Su Studio Architecture, University of Southern California, 

While Doris is very much an artist, her education began with the study of biology and her process is based on her understanding of the biological world, such as the ways termite mounds accommodate themselves to thermal changes. Her work is very much focused on materials, what she calls “Metal that Breathes” or more broadly “Taming Smart Materials to Behave.” Her current focus is on thermal bimetals, a material that expands and contracts with temperature swings — the basic principle of a thermostat. Her work includes multiple iterations of these small units in multiple types of assemblies that can be used as sun shades, privacy screens and ventilation systems that change automatically with temperature, light and other climate variations without the use of electricity. Despite the mechanical characteristics of these devices, she sees them in an organic way — what she calls the skin of architecture. This typically takes the form of various curtain wall configurations in combination with glass, but other projects go beyond the building skin to become free standing structures-crustaceans. “Bloom,” an installation at the Materials and Application Gallery in Los Angeles is a large freestanding vortex composed of hyperbolic paraboloids. It is also constructed of smart thermobimetal and as the sun heats the surface it opens to ventilates that areas of the shell.

 

Nathan King

Nathan King, Lead Research Strategist at the Autodesk BUILD Space

 Nathan King is well known to many of us from his pioneering robotics work during his time at Virginia Tech in projects such as the “Breathe Wall.” Nathan’s primary focus at present is his work as lead Research Strategist at the Autodesk BUILD Space. He began his career as a painter and his work, however technologically driven, still informed by a painter’s sensibility. To him, a brush and a robot are both tools. Much of his work employs traditional materials — wood and steel — but with radical fabrication techniques, particularly robotics. The Lo-Fab (locally fabricated), Pavilion on the Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston, Massachusetts was created by Virginia Tech faculty and students working with the MASS Design Group. It is a robotically fabricated structure something like a dome that requires a variety of tapered wood struts and multi-flanged steel connectors. It is a project that demonstrates not just the technical sophistication of robotics, but that it is a technology that can be used not just to hide joints but to beautifully articulate them.

 

David Freeland

David Freeland, FreelandBuck, Los Angeles, Sci Arc 

Like Nathan and Rafik, David sees his firm’s work grounded in certain traditional art forms, an extension of the trompe-l’oeil spaces of history such as the ceiling of the church of St. Ignatius in Rome. This however is only one aspect of the blurring of the real and the representational in their work. Also like Rafik and Eric, they work with light and illusion but in a far more literal way, exploring the boundaries of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional as well as blurring scales and types of representation in the process.  David notes that, “The Renaissance tradition of Trompe l’oeil ceilings uses the illusionary depth of perspective to project what is not there; a dome that was never built or an attic filled with angels.” All of their work is representative, but with varying levels of representation.

Their offices for Hungry Man Productions is a project closer to traditional architecture — a series of cubicles that creates an environment and flexible working configurations. Some of the cubicles are functional. Some are purely representational. They are filled with furniture, some of which is also real and some of which that is not.

Out of the Picture” is their proposed installation for the MoMA 2018 PS 1, Young Architects Program Competition. The streets and facades of Long Island City surrounding the PS1 courtyard are both literally and scenographically projected on to a series of vertical surfaces in the courtyard.

Parallax Gap” is their competition-winning installation at the Smithsonian and makes the strongest connection to the great illusionist ceilings of historyThe installation is a “ceiling” hung in the Grand Salon of the Renwick Gallery.  It is a collage of domed, coffered and beamed roofs of familiar American buildings-from Federal Hall in New York to the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco-in greatly reduced size, are color printed onto plastic but are also given real three-dimensional configurations.

 

Refik Anadol

Refik Anadol, Director UCLA Department of Design Media Arts

Refik Anadol is a media artist and a recipient of a Microsoft Research’s Best Vision Award. Refik brings his boundless energy and enthusiasm to a self-invented profession that defies categorization. It is architecture but it is architecture of light and images. But Refik is, in his own way, a traditionalist. Like others he sees his work connected to the traditions of art, in this case modernist ones — to James Turrell, Dan Flavin, and the Light + Space movement of the 1970s — and the influence of Turrell is apparent in his “Cube” project.

Much of Rafik’s current work involves what he calls “Making data visible” by means of parametric data sculptures. The lobby of an SOM office building in San Francisco is the location of his “SF data” project a 40-foot-wide screen with constantly changing images-a series of “data sculptures” based on a publicly-available data. He explains, “Through sensors, databases, information is collect on the city: sound, light, air quality, acoustics, human movement, ecological dimensions, social preferences. The installation uses the public dataset, as well as social network data, which are translated into images. Often, this materializes as trompe-l’œil illusions that play with the depth of the screen.” Some images architecture-specific. Some are quite concrete. Others are nebulous.

His most conspicuous and most ambitious work is his sound light/video/installation at Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall. Music is converted into digital imagery, breaking the art/ architecture boundaries in a number of ways. “The dynamic visual program uses custom-built algorithmic sound analysis to listen and respond to the music in real time, using architecture as a canvas and light as a material. Additionally, the movements of the conductor, are captured by Microsoft Kinect hardware and 3-D depth camera analysis to inform the visuals displayed.”

Doris Kim Sung, David Freeland, Refik Anadol, Nathan King

We closed with a Panel Discussion speculating on the variety of ways designers can cross these boundaries whether in theoretical or practical realms.

 

Posted in Professional Development News

2018 ArchEx Theme

We’re excited to announce that the theme for this year’s Architecture Exchange East is Tension. Over the course of the conference, we will take a closer look at balance and compromise in architecture. Tension exists both within and without our work. From the physical tension that empowers buildings to stand to the tension between creative vision and practical restrictions, we are thrilled to explore this theme.

Further announcements about the registration dates and pricing, keynote speaker, the panel discussion topic and speakers, tours, and networking events will be coming soon.

We look forward to seeing you in Richmond this November 7-9.

Posted in Professional Development News

Design Forum 2018 is a Wrap!

Design Forum XIII: BLUR was held April 6-7, 2018 at the Taubman Museum in Roanoke. Attendees enjoyed presentations from Eric Höweler, Doris Kim Sung, Nathan King, David Freeland and Refik Anadol. Thank you to those who attended!

 

We would also like to take this opportunity to again thank our sponsors who made this event possible:

College of William and Mary, Art & Art History
Clark Nexsen
Hanbury
University of Virginia School of Architecture
BCWH
Moseley Architects
Ascent Engineering Group, Inc.
Mark S. Orling, AIA
Skanksa USA Building
Pella Windows of Virginia
HBA Architecture + Interior Design
Virginia Tech School of Architecture & Design
Forrester Construction
RMF Engineering
Dunbar Milby Williams Pittman & Vaughan
Reader & Swartz Architects, P.C.
PMA Architecture
AIA Central Virginia
Pyrok, Inc.
Shade & Wise, Inc.
Gulf Seaboard General Contractors, Inc.
AIA Northern Virginia
The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
Anonymous
Hays + Ewing Design Studio
LKH Architects

And the AIA Virginia Design Committee members:

C. Michael Gibson, AIA
Andrea Quilici, AIA
Camilo Bearman, AIA
Jack Davis, FAIA
Ed Ford, AIA
Allison Ewing, AIA
Mark Orling, AIA
Matthew Pearson, AIA
Edwin J. Pease, AIA
Rob Reis, AIA
Roberto Ventura

Posted in Professional Development News

SAP Training Coming to Norfolk

AIA Disaster Assistance Program: Building Evaluator Training
CREDITS// 6.5 HSW CEUs
Saturday, June 9, 2018
8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Location: AECOM, Norfolk, Va.

Register>> SOLD OUT

Intended for licensed architects, engineers, or certified building inspectors; this course certifies attendees as Building Evaluators in the nationally recognized Safety Assessment Program (SAP). The program is managed by Cal OES with cooperation from professional organizations, including the AIA.

It utilizes volunteers and mutual aid resources to provide professional engineers, architects and certified building inspectors to assist local governments in safety evaluation of their built environment in an aftermath of a disaster.

SAP is the training standard of the AIA Disaster Assistance Program, which provides leadership, advocacy, and training to architects who are interested in volunteering their professional skills in times of crisis.

This workshop will teach participants to conduct rapid damage assessments of structures affected by earthquakes, wind, and water. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to consistently and safely assess structures for habitability and will receive a nationally recognized Cal OES registration ID card from the state of California.

Read the full course description>>

Register>>

Posted in Professional Development News

SAP Training – AIA Disaster Assistance Program: Building Evaluator Training

Intended for licensed architects, engineers, or certified building inspectors; this course certifies attendees as Building Evaluators in the nationally recognized Safety Assessment Program (SAP). The program is managed by Cal OES with cooperation from professional organizations, including the AIA. It utilizes volunteers and mutual aid resources to provide professional engineers, architects and certified building inspectors to assist local governments in safety evaluation of their built environment in an aftermath of a disaster. SAP is the training standard of the AIA Disaster Assistance Program, which provides leadership, advocacy, and training to architects who are interested in volunteering their professional skills in times of crisis. This workshop will teach participants to conduct rapid damage assessments of structures affected by earthquakes, wind, and water. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to consistently and safely assess structures for habitability and will receive a nationally recognized Cal OES registration ID card from the state of California.

This session will be led by Mark Vincent Kruse, Architect, AIA

Principal and founder of MVK Architecture & Planning, P.C., a full-service firm that provides diverse services specializing in but not limited to Residential & Commercial New Construction and Planning, Additions, Alterations, Renovation, Remodeling, Site Development & Code Compliance Reviews.

Mark has been an active AIA member since 1999, the 2011 President of the Long Island Chapter and is presently the 2018 President-Elect of AIA New York State. In addition to his leadership and advocacy roles within the AIA he is a certified Cal-OES Post Disaster Safety Assessment Program Building Evaluator and Trainer where he along with other New York State and AIA National trainers under the AIA Disaster Assistance Program are training and certifying Architects and other building industry professionals in Post Disaster Building Safety Assessment. To date he and the other NYS Trainers have trained and certified over 150 additional New York professionals now capable of providing post disaster building safety assessment. His formal disaster response experience began along the south shore of Long Island, NY following Superstorm Sandy.

Throughout his thirty-five-year career Mark has committed himself to advocating for the profession, lecturing, mentoring and providing community services. He is OSHA 10 certified, a New York State Notary Public along with being an active Member of the Building Inspectors Association of Nassau County, the New York State Building Officials Conference, Building Officials Association of Suffolk County, and a Professional Member of the International Code Council.

Join us on Saturday, June 9th in the Norfolk Offices of AECOM. Their address is 1500 Wells Fargo Center, 440 Monticello Ave, Norfolk, VA 23510 from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Posted in Form, Professional Development News

Membership News

Professional Development News

Government Advocacy News

  • Not-So-Good PAC Fact

    Our voice is only a whisper at the table because the PACs of chicken farmers dwarf ours.

Virginia Accord

  • The Virginia Accord

    Bringing together the planning and design disciplines to examine two key themes critical to the future — job creation and environmental sustainability — on Sept. 19-20, 2014 at the Virginia Accord.