Archive | Membership News

New Bylaws Clarification

During the June 16, 2017, virtual membership meeting, the membership approved the new AIA Virginia Bylaws.

It was recently brought to our attention that there needs to be a clarification to an item in these updated bylaws. This clarification is regarding Section 5.03 Qualification of Directors, subsection (a) that speaks to “Component Directors”. In the former bylaws, these individuals were called “Elected Directors”.

During the review of the bylaws, it was the committee’s intent to have the Component Director be a more inclusive position to include emeritus and associate members. As a result, the requirement for this position should be a member in good standing instead of architect member who is a member in good standing.

This change will be presented as a ‘mea culpa’ clarification and voted on at the AIA Virginia Annual Meeting at Architecture Exchange East Nov. 2, 2017.

Posted in Membership News

New Architects

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Miss Mayda V. Colon, AIA
Mr. Jacob Combee, AIA
Mr. Brian Cutler, AIA
Mr. Garett M. Rouzer, AIA

Have you recently passed the ARE? Please send an email to your Member Services Director, Cathy Guske, cguske@aiava.org to upgrade your membership and be featured in the next newsletter.

Posted in Membership News

New Members

We are always excited to welcome new members to Virginia. The following members recently joined the ranks of AIA Virginia.

New Architect Members

Joanne M. Angeles, AIA

New Associate Members

Ms. Ellen M. Augst, Assoc. AIA
Miss Anne Hall, Assoc. AIA
Mr. Dylan Hecox, Assoc. AIA
Ms. Ravine Kiese Mangala, Assoc. AIA
Mr. Donal McElwaine, Assoc. AIA
Ms. Derin Ozler, Assoc. AIA
Ms. Allison Slomski, Assoc. AIA
Miss Sarah E. Stumpo, Assoc. AIA
Mr. Shuo Wang, Assoc. AIA

Transferred In

Mr. Ryan J. Oldack, Assoc. AIA from AIA Georgia

New/Renewed Allied Members

Gloria Johannessen, Mgr. of Business Operations, Phoenix Noise & Vibration, LLC

View all of the AIA Virginia Allied members

Posted in Membership News

Modernizing an Outdated Estate Plan

 

 

 

 

 

What to do with a Confusing, Old Trust
Estate plans evolve. Or at least they should. Any plan that fails to achieve your goals and doesn’t match your current financial and family circumstances is out of date and is in need of an overhaul. We can help you revitalize the obsolete aspects of your plan and get you back on track for the future.

How to know if you have an outdated trust
If you or anyone you know signed a will or trust in 2012 or before, an immediate review should be on your to-do list. There have been many legal and policy changes since 2012, and your documents may not work as well as they could.

If you signed your will or trust after 2013 and it’s been more than a year since we talked, now is the time to make sure your plan still meets your needs and avoids confusion along with needless complexity, costs, and taxes.

You may also be the beneficiary of a deceased loved one’s will or trust. These older trusts left by a parent or grandparent can often benefit from a “remodel” or modernization.

Quality estate planning is an ongoing process
Like investment or financial planning, tax planning, health and fitness, and so many other aspects of life, proper estate planning is an ongoing process that you must revisit regularly. We make it our business to keep up with the latest developments in legislation and know how to make changes to your plans to avoid risks and seize opportunities. But, we need your help and your engagement in the process to help you avoid the negative consequences of outdated or obsolete planning.

You are not trapped by old plans, even when they’re “irrevocable.”
Now that you are aware of an outdated trust posing a potential risk to your family’s long-term well-being, we can work with you to restate or amend your revocable trust or will. This is a straightforward solution that can update and modernize your trusts and make them ready for the current realities of the legal and financial landscape we live in today.

Many of you probably have an irrevocable trust of some kind as well, an inheritance from a parent or grandparent or even one you made yourself. There are more boundaries and modernization is a more involved process for an irrevocable trust, but we have an array of tools (decanting, trust protector restatement, judicial modification, or non-judicial settlement) at our disposal to “remodel” or modernize an existing irrevocable trust. You’ve probably heard about decanting. It is an increasingly popular option and borrows its name from the decanting process used for wine. Just as you can decant wine by pouring it from its original bottle into a new bottle, leaving the unwanted sediment in the original bottle, you can pour the assets from one trust into a new trust, leaving the unwanted terms in the original trust.

Just as there are many ways to remodel a home, there are many strategies and legal tools that can be used to modernize old estate plans. Since each plan is unique, the way to update it will be as well. Coming up with the most effective strategy requires careful consideration of your current goals and needs, as well as your tolerance for risk.

Even though there is no way to know for sure what to do until some analysis is complete, it’s better to have an informed choice rather than acting upon the assumption that your plan will work as intended, especially if it hasn’t been professionally reviewed. These are complex legal processes, and there is no one-size-fits-all answer.

We want you to have the best possible plan for your family. Since you and your circumstances are unique, give us a call today and let’s explore the options. We look forward to hearing from you.

View the AIA Virginia Benefits Package

Rob Smith
Chartwell Capital Advisors
Robert C. Smith, PLC
The Branch House
2501 Monument Avenue
Richmond, Virginia 23220
(804) 357-5977
rsmith@chartwellcapital.net

This newsletter is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be construed as written advice about a Federal tax matter. Readers should consult with their own professional advisors to evaluate or pursue tax, accounting, financial, or legal planning strategies.

Posted in Membership News

The Seasons Change

At mid-year, we take a look back at the accomplishments of AIA Virginia this year was shared with the membership during our virtual membership meeting on June 16, 2017. First and most transformational, the organization has implemented the strategic plan as the focus of board and council meeting agendas giving all board members the ability to engage and have a voice in a meaningful way.

2017 AIA President Bill Brown, AIA

With thanks to Maggie Shubert, AIA, Marshall Dreiling, and our AIA Virginia staff, we launched a very successful inaugural Art of Practice Conference which will be an annual alternating companion event to the Design Forum. This opportunity brought practitioners from around the state to share ideas on the business practice of architecture. To recognize the different climates we work within we initiated the creation of a small firm roundtable and a mid-size firm roundtable. Continuation of the large firm roundtable which had been convened three years ago elevated the conversation of how AIA Virginia is of value and relevant to these firms in light of our needing their continued support with the planned phase-out of supplemental dues.

Through our Government Advocacy Council, we continued our successful legislative activities. Efforts lead by Rhea George, Hon. AIA Virginia guided the development and approval by the board in our June 16th meeting of AIA Virginia’s Directory of Public Policy and Position Statements. Also, I want to highlight that all statewide legislators and the three elected offices are up for election this year so support our PAC so that we can continue our valuable relationships with incumbents that have worked toward our mutual vision of the built environment in Virginia.

Under the guidance of Nick Vlattas, AIA, we conducted a successful nationwide search for a new EVP and have appointed the amazing Corey Clayborne, AIA. His commitment to the service to the profession and to the individual members that make up our AIA family is unparalleled. As July starts he has already begun his position and is implementing his 30/60/90 day plan. We see great things to come in our collective future with Corey at the helm!

This is a special moment in time for AIA Virginia as the seasons change we are experiencing a notable change ourselves. This past June 30th marked the departure of our esteemed EVP and my friend, Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA, and the arrival of Corey Clayborne, AIA, at this same post. I can’t think of two persons that have been and are so passionate, focused and exemplary to lead our organization. Together AIA Virginia has re-envisioned and transformed the organization under Helene’s leadership to be member focused, transparent in our governance, financially sustainable and of value to the architects in the Commonwealth. There is a seamless transition underway that warrants a great confidence in the organization.

For her part, Helene has gone far above and beyond the call of duty in her role as leader. She has used her nurturing spirit and passion for architecture to strengthen our organizations working tirelessly to effect positive change. I want to share a personal side of saying farewell to my friend Helene as she and I were in the same architecture class at Virginia Tech and I had the privilege of speaking for AIA Virginia at the recent Branch Museum event to recognize her tireless service to our organizations. When Helene ran for president of the American Institute of Architects, she did so on a platform of cultural change. As Virginia architects watched with pride at her inauguration in 2014, we were confident in her leadership and her capacity as a change-maker for our National organization. She brought this same spirit to AIA Virginia and The Branch and both organizations are better for it.

Throughout her career, Helene has dedicated herself to mentoring young professionals and advocating on their behalf. As the volunteer leaders of AIA Virginia pondered a fitting way to acknowledge her contributions to our profession, we could think of no more appropriate recognition than the naming of the Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA Studio. This space at the Branch will permanently honor Helene’s legacy by fostering the cultivation of interns at the cusp of their professional lives. This cause has been a cornerstone of Helene’s professional career, and The Studio will be used to nurture the growth and development of the many interns who come to The Branch each year. It is a fitting symbol to honor her dedication to and support of both the profession of architecture and The Branch Museum of Architecture and Design.

Take care, my friend!

Bill Brown, AIA
2017 President AIA Virginia

Posted in Membership News

Thanks a Million!

The “selfie” video above is VERY low production costs, but the content can literally save you a million dollars. In addition to all the other work we do, we appraise existing life insurance policies. As in the example in the video, a client was counting on $1 million flowing into a trust we created from an existing life insurance carrier. The problem was the carrier is no longer in the life insurance business, its financials have degraded and the policy was likely going to expire long before the client died. We took the cash value of the policy, got him a new policy with a strong carrier with better investment returns and put a long term care rider on the policy. Had we not done this work, the $ 1 million dollars he was expecting likely would not have happened.

Reviewing and analyzing life insurance is often akin to finding buried treasure in the backyard. It costs you nothing, but the extra money “found” can be a pot of gold for your family. All existing life insurance policies should be appraised. We do this a complementary service for all AIA Virginia members.

On another note, we recently procured a professional liability insurance policy for an AIA Virginia member firm. We were told by this firm that they had priced this product out for many years, and our price and terms were the best they had ever seen. If you want us to review your existing professional liability insurance, give us a call or email us.

Finally on the legal front.

Modernizing an Outdated Estate Plan

What to do with a Confusing, Old Trust
Estate plans evolve. Or at least they should. Any plan that fails to achieve your goals and doesn’t match your current financial and family circumstances is out of date and is in need of an overhaul. We can help you revitalize the obsolete aspects of your plan and get you back on track for the future.

How to know if you have an outdated trust
If you or anyone you know signed a will or trust in 2012 or before, an immediate review should be on your to-do list. There have been many legal and policy changes since 2012, and your documents may not work as well as they could. If you signed your will or trust after 2013 and it’s been more than a year since we talked, now is the time to make sure your plan still meets your needs and avoids confusion along with needless complexity, costs, and taxes. You may also be the beneficiary of a deceased loved one’s will or trust. These older trusts left by a parent or grandparent can often benefit from a “remodel” or modernization.

Quality estate planning is an ongoing process
Like investment or financial planning, tax planning, health and fitness, and so many other aspects of life, proper estate planning is an ongoing process that you must revisit regularly. We make it our business to keep up with the latest developments in legislation and know how to make changes to your plans to avoid risks and seize opportunities. But, we need your help and your engagement in the process to help you avoid the negative consequences of outdated or obsolete planning.

You are not trapped by old plans, even when they’re “irrevocable.”
Now that you are aware of an outdated trust posing a potential risk to your family’s long-term well-being, we can work with you to restate or amend your revocable trust or will. This is a straightforward solution that can update and modernize your trusts and make them ready for the current realities of the legal and financial landscape we live in today.

Many of you probably have an irrevocable trust of some kind as well, an inheritance from a parent or grandparent or even one you made yourself. There are more boundaries and modernization is a more involved process for an irrevocable trust, but we have an array of tools (decanting, trust protector restatement, judicial modification, or non-judicial settlement) at our disposal to “remodel” or modernize an existing irrevocable trust. You’ve probably heard about decanting. It is an increasingly popular option and borrows its name from the decanting process used for wine. Just as you can decant wine by pouring it from its original bottle into a new bottle, leaving the unwanted sediment in the original bottle, you can pour the assets from one trust into a new trust, leaving the unwanted terms in the original trust.

Just as there are many ways to remodel a home, there are many strategies and legal tools that can be used to modernize old estate plans. Since each plan is unique, the way to update it will be as well. Coming up with the most effective strategy requires careful consideration of your current goals and needs, as well as your tolerance for risk.

Even though there is no way to know for sure what to do until some analysis is complete, it’s better to have an informed choice rather than acting upon the assumption that your plan will work as intended, especially if it hasn’t been professionally reviewed. These are complex legal processes, and there is no one-size-fits-all answer.

We want you to have the best possible plan for your family. Since you and your circumstances are unique, give us a call today and let’s explore the options. We look forward to hearing from you.

View the AIA Virginia Benefits Package

Rob Smith
Chartwell Capital Advisors
Robert C. Smith, PLC
The Branch House
2501 Monument Avenue
Richmond, Virginia 23220
(804) 357-5977
rsmith@chartwellcapital.net

More than just a law firm. We provide legal and financial services to businesses and wealthy individuals. We are problem solvers and opportunity seekers. We deliver and manage a wide variety of professional services for our clients. Once we identify your needs, we offer state of the art financial products to allow our clients to build and retain wealth and reduce risks. We either provide or broker/manage: legal, accounting, financial and real estate advisory services through our “best in the industry” model that allows our clients to receive outstanding professional services at competitive and fair prices.

This newsletter is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be construed as written advice about a Federal tax matter. Readers should consult with their own professional advisors to evaluate or pursue tax, accounting, financial, or legal planning strategies.

Posted in Membership News

New Architects

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Ms. Eboni A. Gold, AIA
Mr. Michael M. Wood, AIA

Have you recently passed the ARE? Please send an email to your Member Services Director at cguske@aiava.org to upgrade your membership and be featured in the next newsletter.

Posted in Membership News

New Members

We are always excited to welcome new members to Virginia. The following members recently joined the ranks of AIA Virginia.

New Architect Members

Mr. Lorenzo Battistelli, AIA
Mr. Daniel J. Deceder, AIA
Mr. John R. Garrett, AIA
Mr. Farokh Hejazi, AIA
Mr. Elad Ravid, AIA

New Associate Members

Mr. Uri Cooper II, Assoc. AIA
Ms. Iroda Karimova, Assoc. AIA
Ms. Tao K. Li, Assoc. AIA
Mr. Lorin Henry Schwartz, Assoc. AIA
Mr. Norman Lee Smith Jr., Assoc. AIA
Miss Shaqreeyah L. Washington, Assoc. AIA

New International Associate Member

Mr. Reneirio E. Minguez II, Intl. Assoc. AIA

Transferred In

Mr. Dennis M. Findley, AIA from AIA Massachusetts
Ms. Emily L. Freeland, AIA from AIA DC

New/Renewed Allied Members

Glenn Thompson, Director of Business Development, W.M. Jordan Company
Steven O’York, Owner/President, Closets of Virginia LLC
Jay Peterson, Principal, NKE Lighting, Inc./First Light
Michael Galli, VP, Principal Engineer, Branch Manager, ECS Mid-Atlantic, LLC
Dan Longenderfer, Director of Marketing, York Building Products
Ian Sole, Partner/Co-Owner, 3D Central
Patrick Cushing, Attorney, Williams Mullen
Dave France, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.
Margaret Chewning, Specification Consultant, SpexResources, LLC
Richard Crovo, President, Atlantic Sales & Marketing

View all of the AIA Virginia Allied members

Posted in Membership News

Thank You

“I’m not afraid of the new ideas.  I’m afraid of the old ones.” ~ John Cage

As I began considering the potential focus for this June edition of my bi-monthly newsletter article, I thought I would perhaps simply write about something of general importance to the profession or the organization, and steer clear of a ‘farewell address.’  But, this is my only such opportunity.  So I hope my colleagues and friends will bear with me as I share a few thoughts prior to my departure.

Many individuals have recently asked me about my “proudest achievements” in my positions as EVP of AIA Virginia and Executive Director of The Branch Museum of Architecture and Design.  My response to them has been one that jumped to mind and it applies to both organizations, but in different ways: CULTURE.  This might be familiar to some of you, who knew that I focused on a “cultural transformation for the profession” when I ran and served as President of the AIA in 2014.  My message then: we need to act, think, and behave differently as architects if we are to be perceived in an enriched way by the public we serve.  That is the same point of view I brought to both of these posts.

For AIA Virginia, that “cultural transformation” has been realized through focusing on the single member.  As I’ve said to you before, every action we take or decision we make is with our dues-paying members in mind.  This, you can believe.  Often in the past, the AIA was criticized for keeping the organization going (as an entity) and not caring about the folks who comprise our membership (as individuals).  We favor the opposite approach, where the member comes first.  Members have noticed!  Colleagues all over the state have stated that the organization ‘feels’ different.  People are talking about AIA Virginia in many positive ways.  Firms that had not been members in a long time are coming back into the fold.  I’d like to think that the culture of the organization is, in fact, transformed.

Much of this has been possible because of a highly engaged and deeply committed Board of Directors, as well as ‘my’ three presidents who’ve been a joy to work with: Valerie Hassett, Nick Vlattas, and Bill Brown, to use their informal names.  These people did – and are still doing – awesome work on your behalf.  When I accepted this position, I insisted that our efforts be “about aspiration rather than appeasement.”  (In other words, after being AIA president, I wanted to move our state-level AIA well forward as we launch into our next century.)  Each of these leaders and their executive committees and boards have been all about the new AIA Virginia.  I have been extremely impressed with – and inspired by – their courage to explore new worlds and their dedication to finding fresh ways of providing service and support to our members.

Speaking of dedication … and its very close cousin, devotion … there is not a stronger group than your staff team at AIA Virginia.  They are simply incredible, and it has been my honor to serve with such a professional, hard-working, and loyal group: Judy Cheadle, Marshall Dreiling, Keesha Ezell, Rhea George, Cathy Guske, Rebecca Lonadier, and Edward Nace.  All are willing to jump in to help in whatever capacity is needed, and all have been brave in stomaching the many changes I requested.  They have worked like crazy, sometimes to the breaking point, and I cannot speak highly enough about them either individually or collectively.

And how about that Corey Clayborne?  I am SO excited about his tenure!  He’ll be a stellar representative of the profession to related organizations and a charismatic face and voice on behalf of our members.  Not to mention an exceptional staff team leader.  In other words, Corey is the perfect fit for the organization at this moment in time.  I have every confidence that he, along with that brilliant staff team and outstanding board group, will elevate AIA Virginia to even greater heights.

Today, I extend my sincere appreciation to each of you for affording me this opportunity to serve the profession in our state and to support my fellow members.  I’m a lifer, really … a true “AIA Junkie” … and I eagerly anticipate being a fervent member of our beloved AIA Virginia, forever …

Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA | EVP, AIA Virginia

Posted in Membership News

Virtual Membership Meeting

Hear about the work happening within your professional society at a virtual Meeting of the Membership on Friday, June 16, 2017, from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An important vote will take place on the revised bylaws.

To engage the broadest number of participants, members can join the June 16th meeting electronically.

Register>> for the membership meeting

Note: When motions are presented, the voting members of AIA Virginia are assigned Architect members, Associate members, Emeritus, and Fellows.

Review the following meeting documents:

  1. Agenda
  2. Minutes from Nov. 3, 2016, annual membership meeting
  3. Revised Bylaws
  4. Bylaws Motion

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Please take a moment to download and test the meeting software. It takes just a few minutes to activate your account and make sure everything is working.

Questions?
Call (804) 237-1768

 

Posted in Membership News

 

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Membership News

  • New Bylaws Clarification

    During the June 16, 2017, virtual membership meeting, the membership approved the new AIA Virginia Bylaws.




Professional Development News

  • Collaboration

    Join us in Richmond this November for the 30th annual Architecture Exchange East.




Government Advocacy News

  • Work on 179D Continues

    AIA Virginia and our friends with ACEC Virginia have been working for years to address issues surrounding the Internal Revenue Code Section 179D, Energy-Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction.




Supporters

Virginia Accord

  • The Virginia Accord

    Bringing together the planning and design disciplines to examine two key themes critical to the future — job creation and environmental sustainability — on Sept. 19-20, 2014 at the Virginia Accord.