Alternative Paths to Licensure – IPAL

As the profession of architecture grows in new and interesting directions, so does the education and licensure paths that feed into it.  Many in the profession are familiar with the typical education path of having an intern position to earn NCARB experience while a student, earning a NAAB accredited degree, earn more experience, and pass the exams.  However, in the past few years, NCARB has been working to provide an alternative path to licensure and is working with state licensing boards to get this path approved as a viable option. This path is known as the Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure (IPAL). 

IPAL is an accelerated path to licensure for students to meet the requirements for licensure while documenting the same hours of work experience, obtaining a NAAB accredited degree, and passing their exams all at once.  When they gather their diploma they will be a fully accredited architect (pending any other requirements from their jurisdiction of practice).  Currently, there are 26 programs at universities that offer the IPAL program.  A majority of the universities offer it as a graduate program, yet there are those that offer it to undergraduates although there may be certain stipulations applied.  These programs typically have tie-ins for work-study programs or strong connections to internship programs with local firms to help facilitate the work experience needed to meet IPAL and NCARB requirements.  Many IPAL participants will need to work what equates to a part-time job at a minimum along with being a full-time student to meet all the requirements to complete the program. 

With a new path to licensure emerging and tying into education requirements provided nationally, those who dream of a career in architecture will have multiple paths to obtaining licensure. In 2018, the first group of IPAL graduates moved into the workforce. It will be interesting to see how their alternative path and experience has molded them as architects, and if any change will be ushered into the profession as a whole.

For more information on IPAL, requirements, and a list of institutions that provide the path, visit https://www.ncarb.org/become-architect/ipal.

article submitted by Virginia Licensing Advisor, Michael Hammon, AIA. You can reach out to Michael at mhammon@glaveandholmes.com with any licensing questions.

NCARB Update from our Virginia Licensing Advisor

I recently had the pleasure to represent AIA Virginia as the NCARB Liaison at the NCARB Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  The conference is held every two years to bring together liaisons from the professional and educational sector, which is comprised of both educators and students.  For two days, we hunker down and attend presentations, lectures, and networking events where we are updated on everything NCARB is doing to provide for students of architecture, those working towards their licensure and those already licensed. With the exams moving completely to the ARE 5.0, much of what was discussed was using the correct terminology (AXP instead of IDP), how ARE 5.0 differs from previous versions, and what information NCARB is providing for those in need.  Having taken all my exams in ARE 5.0, many of the topics were a refresher for me. It was more about those at NCARB explaining why they did the many things that they did when transitioning from ARE 4.0 to ARE 5.0.  However, there were two areas they focused on at the conference that I felt would be worthy to relay and are areas when I accepted this position I didn’t fully expect I would be able to assist in.

First, as the NCARB Liaison, while I have a duty to help those setting up their NCARB account, accruing credits via AXP, or taking exams, I also have the ability to be of great assistance to the supervisors and mentors of those progressing towards licensure.  So for those who are supervisors or mentors to licensee candidates, I’m here to assist with any questions you may have as far as your duties in the role you are taking on. I’m sure there are moments when those you are supervising ask you questions that you simply do not know.  That’s perfectly okay and feel free to reach out.  Currently, NCARB is putting together a matrix of duties and responsibilities supervisors should aim for. That matrix should be released soon.

Second, how many have heard of NCARB Certification?  It’s understandable if you have not, as I was not quite sure what it exactly entailed either when I first took the position.  Once you have received licensure you likely keep your NCARB record paid for and current.  The best course of action, if desired, would be to apply for your NCARB Certificate.  The NCARB Certificate acts as the main component for reciprocity in other jurisdictions.  Every state is different and will likely require you to do something a little extra (Virginia has the DPOR exam), but having your NCARB Certificate lets the jurisdiction you apply to know your records are all in one spot and in safe holding with a recognized organization.

If it has been a while since you have visited the NCARB website now is as good of a time to visit.  There is a litany of information and resources on their website.  Check out NCARB: By the Numbers (2019) for numbers on exam pass rates, timelines on averages to complete the process, numbers on demographics, and plenty more. As well, NCARB has provided an interactive map that can help those working towards licensure figure out what their jurisdiction requires of them, but it can also assist those already licensed to figure out what a jurisdiction will require of them if they’re seeking reciprocity.

As always, if you have questions about any and all things AXP, ARE, or NCARB, you can reach me at mhammon@glaveandholmes.com.

Michael Hammon, AIA
AIA Virginia Licensing Advisor

ARE Update

The Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) 4.0 retires in just a few weeks—here’s what you should expect if you haven’t finished testing by June 30, 2018.

Transitioning to ARE 5.0
If you haven’t already transitioned before ARE 4.0 retires, our system will most likely transition you the first time you log in to your NCARB Record and open the Exams tab. Any division credits that you’ve earned will show in your Record based on the Transition Calculator, and you’ll be able to schedule your first ARE 5.0 division right away.

If you’ve recently tested in ARE 4.0 and are still waiting on a score report, you will not be able to transition until your score is posted. As soon as the score posts and you view your Exams tab, you’ll either be marked as ARE complete or be transitioned to ARE 5.0 if you still have some divisions left.

If you have testing accommodations that include extra breaks or extended time, you will need to contact NCARB’s Customer Relations team to transition. You’ll also see a message about this on your Exams tab.

Due to extremely high testing volumes, score reports may take longer to process between now and the retirement. Although candidates typically receive their results within 1-2 weeks, score reports for divisions taken between now and June 30, 2018, may take up to 3-4 weeks to post.

Not planning on testing between now and June 30? Make the transition now!

Navigating the New Exam
Not familiar with ARE 5.0? Here are two key resources to help you get used to the new exam:
ARE 5.0 Handbook—This essential resource walks you through each division, providing specific objectives, sample questions, suggested references, and more.

ARE 5.0 Demonstration Exam—Want to practice navigating the new exam format? Log in to your NCARB Record to try our free demo exam.

Need Help?
Join the ARE 5.0 Community to connect with NCARB’s exam experts and your fellow candidates.

Do you have questions about licensure? Please contact Rachel Shelton, AIA, Virginia Licensing Advisor at rachel.shelton@dgs.virginia.gov

New Architects

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Mr. Vernon Hall, AIA
Mrs. Emily J. Striffler, AIA
Mrs. Leslie Thompson, AIA

Have you recently passed the ARE? Please send an email to your Member Services Director at cguske@aiava.org to upgrade your membership and be featured in the next newsletter.

New Architects

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Mr. Nicholas J. Cooper, AIA
Mr. Kevin Curran, AIA
Mr. Michael P. Ervi, AIA
Mr. Brad T. Sucher, AIA
Mr. Kevin Svensen, AIA
Mrs. Rasheda T. Tripp, AIA

Have you recently passed the ARE? Please send an email to your Member Services Manager at rlonadier@aiava.org to upgrade your membership and be featured in the next newsletter.

New Architects

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Mrs. Laurel M. Blanchard, AIA
Ms. Christina R. Harris, AIA
Ms. Sonia R. Jarboe, AIA
Mrs. Abbe Little, AIA
Mrs. Emily H. Winn, AIA

Have you recently passed the ARE? Please send an email to your Member Services Manager at rlonadier@aiava.org to upgrade your membership and be featured in the next newsletter.

Congratulations New Architects

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Mr. Jeffrey S. Armstead, AIA
Mrs. Elisabeth K. Hunt, AIA
Mr. Neil A. King, AIA

Have you recently passed the ARE? Please send an email to your Membership Manager at rlonadier@aiava.org to upgrade your membership and be featured in the next newsletter.

 

New Architects

Congratulations!

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Have you recently passed the ARE? Please send an email to your Membership Manager at scalvin@aiava.org to upgrade your membership and be featured in the next newsletter.

Allison D. Dar, AIA
Heidi B. FitzHarris AIA
Jonathan C. Moore, AIA
Nathan T. Williams AIA

Congratulations New Architects

We understand the dedication and effort required to study for and pass the ARE exams. Congratulations to the following members for passing their exams and gaining licensure. This is great news that thrills all of us and we are so proud to call you architects!

Rebecca C. Boller, AIA
Hallie A. Futterman, AIA
Kenneth Charles Harbaugh, AIA

IDP Changes Effective Dec. 16

© 2006, The American Institute of Architects. All rights reserved.
© 2006, The American Institute of Architects. All rights reserved.

The AIA recently commended the decision of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) Board of Directors to remove the employment duration requirement in the Intern Development Program (IDP). This change will allow interns to earn IDP experience regardless of time spent on a project. The eligibility requirement is also being simplified to allow interns to begin earning credit upon graduation from high school. The changes go into effect Dec. 16, 2013.

“This is an exciting development many of us have worked for, and for me proof that together the AIA and NCARB have taken the first steps down a road that will have immediate benefits for the young men and women who are the future of our profession,” said AIA President, Mickey Jacob, FAIA.

Internship Advisory Committee co-chair, John A. Padilla, AIA, added, “The elimination of the minimum IDP Duration Requirement for our interns responds boldly to today’s changing nature of architectural practice. This change is monumental in allowing our interns to earn credit for all experience hours gained during the performance of their work no matter the length of their employment with a firm.”

Read the NCARB announcement>>