PAC Competition Update

 “Rumble in the Jungle” PAC Competition Closes October 31

  1. AIA Hampton Roads – 80 points
  2. AIA Central Virginia – 70 points
  3. AIA Richmond – 40 points
  4. AIA Northern Virginia – 20 points
  5. AIA Blue Ridge – 0 points

The winner receives $1,000 for its use for Architecture Week 2020.

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Below outlines point allocations:

  1. Local component Board participation
    1. Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?
      1. Yes = 20 points
      2. No = 0 points
  2. Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC
    1. Component with highest % = 40 points
      1. Component with second-highest % = 20 points
      2. Component with third highest % = 10 points
  3. Average investment per member from the total local component membership
    1. Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
    2. Component with second-highest average investment/member = 30 points
    3. Component with third-highest average investment/member = 20 points
    4. Component with fourth-highest average investment/member = 10 points
    5. Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

The scoring will be closed on October 31, 2019, at 5:00 p.m. EST.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC. The Award will be presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of the its respective membership. The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

AIA Virginia is thankful for the following 2019 PAC Investors:

$5,000 to $9,999

Architecture, Incorporated

$2,500 to $4,999

Hanbury

$1,000 to $2,499

Glave & Holmes Architecture
Quinn Evans Architects
Kenney Payne, AIA

$500 to $999

LeMay Erickson Willcox Architects
MG2 Corporation
William T. Brown, AIA
Robert Comet, AIA

$200-$499

Anonymous
R. Corey Clayborne, AIA
Theresa del Ninno, AIA
David King, AIA
Elisabeth Sloan, AIA
Nick Vlattas, FAIA
Lou Wolf, AIA
Dan Zimmerman, AIA

$100-$199

Anonymous
Husain Alam, AIA
Ron Anderson of Nello Wall Systems
Jim Boyd, AIA
Scott Campbell, AIA
Andrew Cheng, AIA
Tim Colley, AIA
Karen Conkey, AIA
Robert Dunay, FAIA
Robert Easter, AIA
Rebecca Edmunds, AIA
Thomas Ellis, AIA
Eliza Engle, AIA
Lynden Garland, AIA
Genevieve Keller
Thomas Kerns, FAIA
Ed Gillikin, AIA
Eric Keplinger, AIA 
Jeanne LeFever, AIA
Jeremy Maloney, AIA
Gregory Powe, AIA
Beth Reader, FAIA
Sean Reilly, AIA
Robert Reis, AIA
J. Mitchell Rowland, III, AIA
James Scruggs, AIA
Charles Todd, AIA
Chris Venable, AIA

Up to $99

Anonymous (8)
Krystal Anderson, AIA
Sam Bowling, AIA
Scott Boyce, AIA
John Burns, FAIA
Mickey Chapa, AIA
April Drake, AIA
Jori Erdman, AIA
Keesha Ezell
Braden Field, AIA
Rhea George, Hon. AIA VA
Jody Lahendro, FAIA
Spencer Lepler, AIA
Robert McGinnis, FASLA
Andrew McKinley, AIA
T.J. Meehan, AIA
Shawn Mulligan, AIA
Kathryn Prigmore, FAIA
Gareth Ratti, AIA
Susan Reed, AIA
Amanda Schlichting, AIA
Damian Seitz, AIA
Marc Treon, AIA
Chris Warren, Assoc. AIA
Ed Weaver, AIA
Jean Webster, AIA
Rob Winstead, AIA
Fred Wolf, AIA

Update on Unlimited Statute of Limitations Meeting

For the past two years, the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) and Associated General Contractors (AGC) have introduced a bill in the General Assembly to provide a statute of limitations (SOL) clause for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the proposals have not passed, the General Assembly directed the Department of General Services (DGS) via the 2019 Appropriation Act, to engage with industry stakeholders on this issue.

In August, a survey was sent out to 1,558 stakeholders in which 507 responses were received. The results of the survey were discussed on October 3 with industry representatives.

The following key points were presented:

  • 58% of respondents were not aware that the Commonwealth of Virginia does not have a SOL regarding construction and professional services contracts
  • 53% of respondents were from the A/E industry, 27% were from the construction industry, and the remaining responses were from attorneys, surety companies, state government/higher education stakeholders, and local governments
  • Most professional services claims come within less than a year after construction completion. By the sixth year, data seems to indicate that claims are non-existent to minimal on professional services
  • Most claims on construction services come between the fourth and sixth year, however, the data shows that significant claims can come at the 10-year mark and beyond

AIA Virginia and ACEC Virginia had several practitioners that spoke to this issue in the meeting.

Our thanks to Donald Booth, AIA, Jim Lowe, Esq., Kathy Blanchard, and Dave Albo (our lobbyist) for providing comments on this issue.

The key points from speakers were as follows:

  • A/E firms design to the standards of the time. If a firm designed a project in 1979, then it was designed to the standards in place at that time – which would be much different than the standards of today
  • If the Commonwealth of Virginia has an unlimited SOL, then practitioners could be at a disadvantage with procuring professional liability insurance for the sole reason of having state agency clients
  • Small businesses are directly affected since they are often sub-consultants and would be subject to the same unlimited SOL terms with the Commonwealth of Virginia as the prime contract holder
  • Claims are often tied to confidentiality agreements which limits data sharing
  • Electronic storage of information changes over time – long term storage will be unreliable as technology changes
  • Claims to A/E’s usually cease after 3-4 years
  • A/E professional liability insurance is claims-based. This means the practitioner has to use the policy in place at the time of the claim regardless of when the project was completed
  • The industry must have certainty in order to manage risk

DGS asked all presenters what the SOL duration should be. The answer was that every firm developed a policy for record retention. The industry standard is usually five to seven years, although firms may decide to maintain records for up to 10 years.

DGS indicated that the final determination was going to be a number that brought a “little pain” to both sides. They will review all of the comments and provide a report to the General Assembly in December.

ACE Virginia Joint Owner Forum Recap with Northern Virginia Local Governments

ACE is a joint venture of the American Institute of Architects, Associated General Contractors, and the American Council of Engineering Companies of Virginia, to educate and promote best practices of the design and construction industry. In 2018, its inaugural year, ACE held three collaborative forums that connected the design and construction professions with those that hire them. What resulted was an improved understanding of what makes projects successful from the perspective of all stakeholders, an intimate forum for business development, and an opportunity to learn about future projects.

On September 24th, ACE had its third Joint Owner Forum of 2019, sixth overall, in Arlington. This year, we have engaged various local governments from around the Commonwealth. This forum hosted stakeholders and decision-makers from the City of Alexandria, Arlington Public Schools, and the Counties of Prince William, Fairfax, and Loudoun.

The panel consisted of the following participants:

Jeff Chambers, AIA – Director of Design & Construction [Arlington Public Schools]
Lou Ann Dorrier, RA – County Architect and Division Chief [Prince William County]
Patti Innocenti, CPPO – Deputy Director of Purchasing & Supply [Fairfax County]
Jeremy McPike – Director of General Services [City of Alexandria]
Cheryl Middleton, CPPB – Division Manager of Procurement [Loudoun]

Below is a snapshot of the key points discussed:

Project Delivery Methods:

  • Design-Bid-Build is still the most frequently used method
  • Arlington Public Schools use CM-at-Risk for projects over $10M
  • PPEA and PPTA are used in specific circumstances such as transportation projects and parking garages
  • City of Alexandria uses all methods and makes its selection based on risk mitigation
  • Job Order Contracting is used for expeditious results are required on small projects
  • Prince William County has adopted the habit of soliciting pre-planning studies before releasing RFPs for large projects. The studies help to fine-tune the program and budget for the CIP

How to Get Work in Each Locality:

  • “We don’t interview firms, we interview people” – they want to get to know the team members who are going to work on the project. Don’t bait and switch
  • The resumes of the individuals is equally, if not more, important than the firm experience
  • Establish your reputation through successful completion of small projects
  • Volunteer in their community every now and then
  • Similar projects mean more than your firm’s proximity to the locality
  • Know the issues involving the community such as zoning, historical issues, sensitivities, etc.
  • You better proofread your proposal
  • Size of firm does not matter – in fact – sometimes the best customer service comes from small firms
  • References are checked. Make sure your references know that they are being used as references
  • In a project interview, be prepared to explain how the project will still be successful if a key player leaves the firm
  • Organize your RFP response to match the structure of the RFP
  • RFP language is being revised to encourage new firms to pursue projects in the respective localities
  • Call it out if an individual gained the relevant experience at another firm

Design and Construction Quality

  • “Why are you delegating so much design?”

This conversation progressed into the Owner’s concerns about losing control of product quality and the Design + Construction industry voiced concerns about increasingly compressed project schedules. Our industry felt that they were often being asked to do the impossible – significantly reduced schedules and expectations of greater quality. It concluded with the request from Owners for us to share if the proposed schedule is unobtainable during the RFP phase.

  • The design industry suggested holding “pre-qualifications” meetings before advertising large projects. This would be an opportunity to learn more about the project’s intimate details which may result in greater value received by the Owners. This thought was embraced by all.

Sustainability

  • Designing to LEED Silver seemed to be the baseline standard. The locality may or may not pursue actual certification.
  • Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) financing structures are being explored and adopted
  • Net-zero buildings are a reality – Arlington Public Schools has two
  • Fairfax has invested in the creation of an Energy + Efficiency Department
  • Commissioning is just as important as the upfront sustainability project decisions

The next forum will take place on Wednesday, November 13 in Roanoke with Southwest Virginia area local governments. Register today>>

PAC Competition Update

One Month to go in the “Rumble in the Jungle” PAC Competition – AIA Hampton Roads is still holding on.

  1. AIA Hampton Roads – 80 points
  2. AIA Central Virginia – 70 points
  3. AIA Richmond – 40 points
  4. AIA Northern Virginia – 20 points
  5. AIA Blue Ridge – 0 points

The winner receives $1,000 for its use for Architecture Week 2020.

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Below outlines point allocations:

  1. Local component Board participation
    1. Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?
      1. Yes = 20 points
      2. No = 0 points
  2. Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC
    1. Component with highest % = 40 points
      1. Component with second-highest % = 20 points
      2. Component with third highest % = 10 points
  3. Average investment per member from the total local component membership
    1. Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
    2. Component with second-highest average investment/member = 30 points
    3. Component with third-highest average investment/member = 20 points
    4. Component with fourth-highest average investment/member = 10 points
    5. Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

The scoring will be closed on October 31, 2019, at 5:00 p.m. EST.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC. The Award will be presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of the its respective membership. The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

AIA Virginia is thankful for the following 2019 PAC Investors:

$5,000 to $9,999
Architecture, Incorporated

$2,500 to $4,999
Hanbury

$1,000 to $2,499
Glave & Holmes Architecture
Quinn Evans Architects
Kenney Payne, AIA

$500 to $999
LeMay Erickson Willcox Architects
MG2 Corporation
William T. Brown, AIA
Robert Comet, AIA

$200-$499
Anonymous
R. Corey Clayborne, AIA
Theresa del Ninno, AIA
Elisabeth Sloan, AIA
Nick Vlattas, FAIA
Lou Wolf, AIA
Dan Zimmerman, AIA

$100-$199
Anonymous
Husain Alam, AIA
Ron Anderson of Nello Wall Systems
Jim Boyd, AIA
Scott Campbell, AIA
Tim Colley, AIA
Karen Conkey, AIA
Robert Dunay, FAIA
Robert Easter, AIA
Rebecca Edmunds, AIA OBO r4 llc
Thomas Ellis, AIA
Eliza Engle, AIA
Lynden Garland, AIA
Genevieve Keller
Thomas Kerns, FAIA
Ed Gillikin, AIA
Eric Keplinger, AIA
Jeanne LeFever, AIA
Jeremy Maloney, AIA
Gregory Powe, AIA
Beth Reader, FAIA
Sean Reilly, AIA
Robert Reis, AIA
J. Mitchell Rowland, III, AIA
James Scruggs, AIA
Chris Venable, AIA

Up to $99
Anonymous (8)
Krystal Anderson, AIA
Sam Bowling, AIA
Scott Boyce, AIA
John Burns, FAIA
Mickey Chapa, AIA
April Drake, AIA
Jori Erdman, AIA
Keesha Ezell
Rhea George, Hon. AIA VA
Jody Lahendro, FAIA
Spencer Lepler, AIA
Robert McGinnis, FASLA
Andrew McKinley, AIA
T.J. Meehan, AIA
Shawn Mulligan, AIA
Kathryn Prigmore, FAIA
Gareth Ratti, AIA
Susan Reed, AIA
Amanda Schlichting, AIA
Damian Seitz, AIA
Marc Treon, AIA
Chris Warren, Assoc. AIA
Jean Webster, AIA
Rob Winstead, AIA
Fred Wolf, AIA

AIA Virginia Hosts First Community Dinner

Last month, we announced that AIA Virginia would be hosting its first Community Dinner in Richmond. Each dinner, which will take place in cities around the Virginia, is intended to forge relationships between architects and community-influencers by bringing them together over dinner for conversations around community. Plans are under way to host one in the Hampton Roads region before the end of the year.

Our first Community Dinner took place on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019 at the home of Burt Pinnock, FAIA. Throughout dinner, everyone shared their individual perspective on the meaning of community. We discussed what made us proud of our community and what challenges needed to be overcome.

When our host asked how the designers at the table could be a resource to the community, a truly meaningful conversation took place. Below are a few quotes and images from the evening.

“We need to provide safe, affordable and dignified housing for all of our citizens.”

“Just give me ONE really good building to set the tone.”

“Design matters. You have to make people feel good about where they live. When they feel proud of where they live, it changes their behavior. When I look at Jeff Davis, I see a blank canvas. Right now, there is crime, prostitution. But, if people felt uncomfortable tossing their bottles out their window, and people could take pride in the neighborhood, you would reduce crime. Build a walkable neighborhood. And, it can’t be built in tax credits – we need to have a tax base.”

“We have great opportunity zones. Tell us where to start.”

“It’s time for Richmond to make its own place.”

“How do we make sure that Richmond’s unique character is not an impediment to growth, density, and great communities for our citizens?”

“We haven’t really had a vision-setting, goal-focused plan. You can help shape that plan.”

 

Community members in attendance were

Lincoln Saunders, Mayor’s Chief of Staff, City of Richmond

Rich Sliwosk, Assoc. VP, VCU Facilities Management

Hon. Andreas Addison, Richmond City Council, First District

William Friday, Deputy Chief of Police, City of Richmond

Leonard Sledge, Director, City of Richmond Economic Development

Mark Olinger, Director of Planning and Development Review, City of Richmond

Bernard Rogers, Vice President of Real Estate Development, Better Housing Coalition

Cindy Davis, Deputy Director, Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development

Rhea George, Managing Director, AIA Virginia

Architects in attendance were:

Burt Pinnock, FAIA, Chairman, Baskervill

Nick Cooper, AIA, Vice President, HKS, Inc.

Krystal Anderson, AIA, Architect, Gresham Smith

Andrew Moore, AIA, Partner, Glave and Holmes Architecture

Charles Piper, AIA, Managing Director, Quinn Evans Architects

Patrick Thompson, Assoc. AIA, Associate, Commonwealth Architects

Ed Gillikin, AIA, Principal, KOP Architects

Lou Wolf, AIA, Principal, SMBW Architects

Corey Clayborne, AIA, MBA, Executive Vice President, AIA Virginia

What Advocacy Means to Me

Krystal Anderson, AIA

As architects we must advocate for our profession and have a voice in our government. There are many ways for us to advocate for architecture including connecting with our local and state leaders. Recently, I had the opportunity to meet Senator Glen Sturtevant at an event I was attending. After the event, I followed up with Senator Sturtevant thanking him for the conversation and expressing the desire for the Richmond chapter to become more involved in our local government. From that correspondence, Senator Sturtevant offered to come meet with our Community & Government affairs committee to discuss the state government and ways for our chapter to become more engaged in the state and local government.

Senator Sturtevant attended our August committee meeting and our committee had a wonderful conversation with him. He explained that becoming familiar with your local government opens up a line of communication to work together on issues that pertain to our profession. Active engagement is paramount to impacting our community on the local level. Throughout the meeting, we found topics that members of our committee could assist him with and let the Senator know that we are here to help. From this meeting, I hope that conversations with our representatives continue and that if Senator Sturtevant ever has a question or needs an opinion related to architecture, he knows that AIA Richmond will be here to help.

Krystal Anderson, AIA
2019 President
AIA Richmond

PAC Competition Update

AIA Hampton Roads Continues to Hold Back Competitors in the “Rumble in the Jungle” PAC Competition

  1. AIA Hampton Roads – 60 points
  2. AIA Central Virginia – 50 points
  3. AIA Richmond – 40 points
  4. AIA Northern Virginia – 20 points
  5. AIA Blue Ridge – 0 points

The winner receives $1,000 for its use for Architecture Week 2020.

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Below outlines point allocations:

  1. Local component Board participation
    1. Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?
      1. Yes = 20 points
      2. No = 0 points
  2. Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC
    1. Component with highest % = 40 points
      1. Component with second-highest % = 20 points
      2. Component with third highest % = 10 points
  3. Average investment per member from the total local component membership
    1. Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
    2. Component with second-highest average investment/member = 30 points
    3. Component with third-highest average investment/member = 20 points
    4. Component with fourth-highest average investment/member = 10 points
    5. Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

The scoring will be closed on October 31, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC. The Award will be presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of its respective members. The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and the total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

AIA Virginia Looks to Address Removal of Uninsurable Language in Design Contracts

In an effort to build a stronger relationship with those who procure professional services, AIA Virginia and the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) Virginia have partnered on a joint sponsorship of the Virginia Association of Governmental Purchasing (VAGP) Fall Symposium. The event will be held September 29 – October 1 at the Virginian Hotel in Lynchburg. VAGP represents over 1,100 procurement professionals employed by public entities across the Commonwealth. This year’s Fall Symposium will emphasize professional development in the procurement of professional services and construction.

Matt Gough (Partner at Ames & Gough) and Jonathan Shoemaker (Managing Member at Lee/Shoemaker) will present on behalf of AIA Virginia and ACEC Virginia. The title of the presentation is “We Agree to What?” and will cover problematical indemnity, insurance, and standard of care terms.

Thank You

AIA Virginia is Thankful for the Following PAC Investors

$5,000 to $9,999
Architecture, Incorporated

$2,500 to $4,999
Hanbury

$1,000 to $2,499
Glave & Holmes Architecture
Quinn Evans Architects
Kenney Payne, AIA (also gave in 2015, 2016, and 2018)

$500 to $999
LeMay Erickson Willcox Architects
William T. Brown, AIA (also gave in 2012-2018)
Robert Comet, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)

$200-$499
Anonymous
R. Corey Clayborne, AIA (also gave in 2014-2015 and 2017-2018)
Theresa del Ninno, AIA (also gave in 2015 and 2018)
Elisabeth Sloan, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Nick Vlattas, FAIA (also gave in 2012-2018)
Lou Wolf, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Dan Zimmerman, Alloy Architecture & Construction llc (also gave in 2016-2018)

$100-$199
Anonymous
Husain Alam, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Ron Anderson of Nello Wall Systems
Jim Boyd, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Scott Campbell, AIA (also gave in 2016 and 2018)
Tim Colley, AIA (also gave 2012-2018)
Karen Conkey, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Robert Dunay, FAIA (also gave in 2018)
Robert Easter, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Rebecca Edmunds, AIA OBO r4 llc (also gave in 2018)
Thomas Ellis, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Eliza Engle, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Lynden Garland, AIA (also gave in 2014 and 2016-2018)
Genevieve Keller
Thomas Kerns, FAIA (also gave in 2015 and 2017-2018)
Ed Gillikin, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Eric Keplinger, AIA (also gave in 2015-2018)
Jeanne LeFever, AIA (also gave in 2013 and 2015-2018)
Jeremy Maloney, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Gregory Powe, AIA
Beth Reader, FAIA (also gave in 2013-2018)
Sean Reilly, AIA (also gave in 2015-2018)
Robert Reis, AIA (also gave in 2013-2015 and 2017-2018)
J. Mitchell Rowland, III, AIA (also gave in 2015 and 2017-2018)
James Scruggs, AIA
Chris Venable, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)

Up to $99
Anonymous (9)
Krystal Anderson, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Sam Bowling, AIA
April Drake, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Keesha Ezell
John Burns, FAIA (also gave in 2013 and 2015-2018)
Rhea George, Hon. AIA VA (also gave in 2015-2017)
Jody Lahendro, FAIA
Spencer Lepler, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Robert McGinnis, FASLA
Andrew McKinley, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
T.J. Meehan, AIA
Kathryn Prigmore, FAIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Gareth Ratti, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Amanda Schlichting, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Marc Treon, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Chris Warren, Assoc. AIA
Jean Webster, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Rob Winstead, AIA (also gave in 2016 and 2018)
Fred Wolf, AIA (also gave in 2018)

Give today at www.aiavapac.org

Early Advocacy Victory Benefiting Firms Who Design Schools

During the 2019 General Assembly, AIA Virginia worked closely with legislators on a bill for school safety that would require every new public school building or renovation to have its plans and specifications reviewed by an individual or entity with professional expertise in building security and crime prevention through building design elements. The law went into effect on July 1, and it was initially, the Department of Education’s intention to make the design professional certify this review. This certification requirement would have created significant risk management and liability concerns for our members. Architecture can deter crime, but can’t stop a mentally ill individual from carrying out a heinous act of violence at a school. In fact, the best solutions require a combination of design and non-design related elements (ex: counselor to student ratios). AIA Virginia successfully worked with the Department of Education to not make it a requirement to have the design professional certify this review. Instead, our organization has offered to work with the Department in helping shape the policy to execute the new law.