PAC Competition Update

AIA Hampton Roads Continues to Hold Back Competitors in the “Rumble in the Jungle” PAC Competition

  1. AIA Hampton Roads – 60 points
  2. AIA Central Virginia – 50 points
  3. AIA Richmond – 40 points
  4. AIA Northern Virginia – 20 points
  5. AIA Blue Ridge – 0 points

The winner receives $1,000 for its use for Architecture Week 2020.

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Below outlines point allocations:

  1. Local component Board participation
    1. Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?
      1. Yes = 20 points
      2. No = 0 points
  2. Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC
    1. Component with highest % = 40 points
      1. Component with second-highest % = 20 points
      2. Component with third highest % = 10 points
  3. Average investment per member from the total local component membership
    1. Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
    2. Component with second-highest average investment/member = 30 points
    3. Component with third-highest average investment/member = 20 points
    4. Component with fourth-highest average investment/member = 10 points
    5. Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

The scoring will be closed on October 31, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC. The Award will be presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of its respective members. The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and the total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

AIA Virginia Looks to Address Removal of Uninsurable Language in Design Contracts

In an effort to build a stronger relationship with those who procure professional services, AIA Virginia and the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) Virginia have partnered on a joint sponsorship of the Virginia Association of Governmental Purchasing (VAGP) Fall Symposium. The event will be held September 29 – October 1 at the Virginian Hotel in Lynchburg. VAGP represents over 1,100 procurement professionals employed by public entities across the Commonwealth. This year’s Fall Symposium will emphasize professional development in the procurement of professional services and construction.

Matt Gough (Partner at Ames & Gough) and Jonathan Shoemaker (Managing Member at Lee/Shoemaker) will present on behalf of AIA Virginia and ACEC Virginia. The title of the presentation is “We Agree to What?” and will cover problematical indemnity, insurance, and standard of care terms.

Thank You

AIA Virginia is Thankful for the Following PAC Investors

$5,000 to $9,999
Architecture, Incorporated

$2,500 to $4,999
Hanbury

$1,000 to $2,499
Glave & Holmes Architecture
Quinn Evans Architects
Kenney Payne, AIA (also gave in 2015, 2016, and 2018)

$500 to $999
LeMay Erickson Willcox Architects
William T. Brown, AIA (also gave in 2012-2018)
Robert Comet, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)

$200-$499
Anonymous
R. Corey Clayborne, AIA (also gave in 2014-2015 and 2017-2018)
Theresa del Ninno, AIA (also gave in 2015 and 2018)
Elisabeth Sloan, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Nick Vlattas, FAIA (also gave in 2012-2018)
Lou Wolf, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Dan Zimmerman, Alloy Architecture & Construction llc (also gave in 2016-2018)

$100-$199
Anonymous
Husain Alam, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Ron Anderson of Nello Wall Systems
Jim Boyd, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Scott Campbell, AIA (also gave in 2016 and 2018)
Tim Colley, AIA (also gave 2012-2018)
Karen Conkey, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Robert Dunay, FAIA (also gave in 2018)
Robert Easter, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Rebecca Edmunds, AIA OBO r4 llc (also gave in 2018)
Thomas Ellis, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Eliza Engle, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Lynden Garland, AIA (also gave in 2014 and 2016-2018)
Genevieve Keller
Thomas Kerns, FAIA (also gave in 2015 and 2017-2018)
Ed Gillikin, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Eric Keplinger, AIA (also gave in 2015-2018)
Jeanne LeFever, AIA (also gave in 2013 and 2015-2018)
Jeremy Maloney, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Gregory Powe, AIA
Beth Reader, FAIA (also gave in 2013-2018)
Sean Reilly, AIA (also gave in 2015-2018)
Robert Reis, AIA (also gave in 2013-2015 and 2017-2018)
J. Mitchell Rowland, III, AIA (also gave in 2015 and 2017-2018)
James Scruggs, AIA
Chris Venable, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)

Up to $99
Anonymous (9)
Krystal Anderson, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Sam Bowling, AIA
April Drake, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Keesha Ezell
John Burns, FAIA (also gave in 2013 and 2015-2018)
Rhea George, Hon. AIA VA (also gave in 2015-2017)
Jody Lahendro, FAIA
Spencer Lepler, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Robert McGinnis, FASLA
Andrew McKinley, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
T.J. Meehan, AIA
Kathryn Prigmore, FAIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Gareth Ratti, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Amanda Schlichting, AIA (also gave in 2018)
Marc Treon, AIA (also gave in 2016-2018)
Chris Warren, Assoc. AIA
Jean Webster, AIA (also gave in 2017-2018)
Rob Winstead, AIA (also gave in 2016 and 2018)
Fred Wolf, AIA (also gave in 2018)

Give today at www.aiavapac.org

Early Advocacy Victory Benefiting Firms Who Design Schools

During the 2019 General Assembly, AIA Virginia worked closely with legislators on a bill for school safety that would require every new public school building or renovation to have its plans and specifications reviewed by an individual or entity with professional expertise in building security and crime prevention through building design elements. The law went into effect on July 1, and it was initially, the Department of Education’s intention to make the design professional certify this review. This certification requirement would have created significant risk management and liability concerns for our members. Architecture can deter crime, but can’t stop a mentally ill individual from carrying out a heinous act of violence at a school. In fact, the best solutions require a combination of design and non-design related elements (ex: counselor to student ratios). AIA Virginia successfully worked with the Department of Education to not make it a requirement to have the design professional certify this review. Instead, our organization has offered to work with the Department in helping shape the policy to execute the new law.

Community Dinners

In September, AIA Virginia will Unveil Groundbreaking Initiative to Connect Architects with Local Community Leaders over Dinner

I’ve seen the data.  I’ve read the survey results.  One major common thread is that, in general, Architects wish the public understood what they did and why they are of importance to society.  As a professional architect, I want that also. The knowledge and skills we possess through our unique education, experience, and training, position us to be a valuable resource to those who influence the quality of life in our respective communities.   In September, AIA Virginia will unveil a groundbreaking initiative that will help bridge that gap around the Commonwealth.

This initiative will be centered on a simple concept of bringing together architects and community influencers over a private catered dinner to discuss what community means to each individual.  Within the context of this conversation, we will discuss what we are most proud of in our community and what challenges are we working to overcome.  How can architects be a resource in overcoming these challenges?

Dinners will have no more than 20 invited individuals.  Of these invitees, six to eight will be architects who live or work in that hosting community.  The other seats will be reserved for local leaders who have influence over shaping the quality of life.  Positions that come to mind are the Mayor, School Superintendent, the individual overseeing Transportation, Housing, and so forth. 

We are proud to announce that the first dinner will be held in Richmond on September 10th at the home of Burt Pinnock, FAIA.  The attendance of Mayor Levar Stoney has been confirmed and we are working on inviting other local leaders.  This initiative is planned to continue for five years with the hope of hosting anywhere between 25 to 50 dinners during this time frame in all corners of Virginia.  Our hope is that this initiative is a seed project in which each of our local components will begin to host their own dinners to continue this dialogue. 

Meal after meal, we look forward to positioning our members to be a valuable resource for the community.

With service,
Corey Clayborne, AIA, MBA
Executive Vice President

Advocacy Matters

AIA State and Local Government Network Conference
Providence, RI
July 17-19, 2019

Last month, architects from around the country gathered for the annual AIA State and Local Government Network (SLGN) conference in Providence, the capital city of Rhode Island.  Originally formed in 1991 as AIA State Government Network, “Local Government” was incorporated this year to broaden the focus to advocacy at local as well as state levels, while AIA Grassroots focuses on advocacy at the federal level.  Why do we spend so much time on advocacy?   Advocacy is the backbone of our profession.  Successful advocacy enables architects to remain relevant to society.   Advocacy preserves a positive business and legal atmosphere for architects to practice in. 

Alexis de Tocqueville wrote that Americans are instinctively geared toward working together.  That insight also describes advocacy at its core.  Advocacy requires listening and teamwork.  Working together, AIA members carry a unique and respected voice to city halls, county offices, statehouses, and Congress.  Working together, AIA members cultivate relationships with key influencers to advocate for laws that preserve the strength of our profession and improve the built environment. 

The AIA National Advocacy team put together a well-organized and inspiring SLGN event consisting of substantial knowledge sharing, compelling speakers, state policy dinners, presentation of the new AIA State & Local Policy Agenda and breakout sessions to explore the new policy agenda items at a deeper level.  One of my favorite parts of the conference was listening to presentations from state and local components highlighting their advocacy successes.  Not surprisingly, our very own Corey Clayborne, AIA was one of the selected speakers.  Corey highlighted these recent AIA Virginia advocacy success stories with attendees:

  • Shift the culture of the AIA Virginia PAC to the benefit of all members
  • Expand relationships and influence with key lawmakers who support the profession
  • Protect Qualifications Based Selection in Virginia by developing and passing House Bill 2198 to close a loophole in the Virginia Public Procurement Act
  • Architects serve as a vital resource on School Safety through a design-centered approach. This led to the passage of House Bill 1738, which now requires all public school building plans for new construction and renovation to be reviewed by an individual or entity with professional expertise in building security and crime prevention through building design.
  • Connect local Architects with local policy influencers to formulate relationships which will use the knowledge and skills of architects to increase the quality of life in their community.

These advocacy success stories are really good news for all Virginia Architects. 

Robust break-out sessions explored AIA National’s proactive State and Local Policy Agenda for its 2020 legislative agenda, including six strategic areas: 

  • Housing Access and Affordability.  Address America’s housing crisis
  • School Safety.  Stand against school violence through the power of design
  • Sustainability.  Support sustainability upgrades in existing buildings
  • Resiliency.  Support Architects aiding in community resilience
  • Business of Architecture.  Require an Architect on more new projects.
  • 21st-century Architect.  Tailor a position to meet the needs of your community.

AIA state and local chapters across the nation will be equipped with knowledge, insights, tools, and resources to advance legislation related to these six strategic issues.

Ben Franklin once stated “well done is better than well said”.  This quote speaks to many things, and especially about advocacy which is concerned with action, about getting it done.  AIA Virginia’s Government Advocacy team works hard every day on behalf of all members to build relationships with key law and policymakers, advance pro-architect and pro-environment legislation and ensure that architects remain vital to the public it serves for years and generations to come. 

As a profession, we are a relatively small group that has the capacity to bring tremendous value to people and their aspirations for a better, healthier life.  Advocacy enables our profession to remain relevant and strong so Architects can continue to make a lasting difference in people’s lives and the built environment. 

Sean E. Reilly, AIA
AIA Virginia Vice-President
Government Advocacy Advisory Council

PAC Award Update

AIA Hampton Roads Still Holds Narrow Lead in “Rumble in the Jungle” PAC Competition

  1. AIA Hampton Roads – 60 points
  2. AIA Central Virginia – 50 points
  3. AIA Richmond – 40 points
  4. AIA Northern Virginia – 20 points
  5. AIA Blue Ridge – 0 points

Winner receives $1,000 for its use for Architecture Week 2020.

As of July 1, no Board has reached 100% PAC participation.

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Below outlines point allocations:

Local component Board participation
Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?

  • Yes = 20 points
  • No = 0 points

Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC

  • Component with highest % = 40 points
  • Component with second highest % = 20 points
  • Component with third highest % = 10 points

Average investment per member from the total local component membership

  • Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
  • Component with second highest average investment/member = 30 points
  • Component with third highest average investment/member = 20 points
  • Component with fourth highest average investment/member = 10 points
  • Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

The scoring will be closed on October 31, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC. The Award will be presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of its respective membership. The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

What Advocacy Means to Me

Jeremy Maloney, AIA

As architects, we have an inherent social mission to better the world, but it takes more than design to elevate the profession. Investing in the AIAVA PAC is an opportunity to empower our leaders, increase awareness, encourage growth, and ensure that all our voices are equally valued, appreciated, and heard. It is this faithful and honest support of our advocates that will promote, preserve, and increase the vitality of our profession.
Do more; support our advocates! Donate to the PAC.

Jeremy S Maloney, AIA, NCARB, SEED
Architect, President
Altruistic Design

Call for Entries: PAC Pin Design

The Problem
Historically, members who invest in AIA Virginia’s Political Action Committee (PAC) have received a lapel pin that can be worn to demonstrate his/her support of our legislative efforts. The existing pin has become dated as it uses the organization’s past name of VSAIA (Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects). AIA Virginia’s Government Advocacy Advisory Council and PAC Board of Trustees desires to engage the membership in the creation of a new pin that represents AIA Virginia.

Submission Requirements

  • The lapel pin will be given to investors of the AIA Virginia PAC
  • It should be suitable to be worn by both, men and women
  • Identify colors being proposed
  • Sketch your proposed design on a napkin
  • Submission should include recommended lapel dimensions
  • Under the sketch, use one sentence to articulate the vision of the design to the jury.
  • Photograph it and email it to Corey Clayborne at cclayborne@aiava.org
  • Submissions Due: Friday, August 16, 2019, at 5:00 p.m. EST

Prize

  • The winner will receive free admission to Architecture Exchange East 2019 as a guest of the Government Advocacy Advisory Council and PAC Board of Trustees
  • The winning submission will be presented at Architecture Exchange East 2019 in conjunction with the “Rumble in the Jungle” award

About the AIA Virginia have a Political Action Committee?

  • Like many professions and occupations, architects have interests that specifically impact our profession, practice, and our community
  • The legislative and regulatory environment is arguably the most important arena that impacts how we provide our professional services
  • When proposed legislation is passed, it becomes law. Therefore, some proposed ideas have good motives, but unintentional consequences. We, as architects, want to have an influential voice in this arena which allows us to control our destiny.
  • We can’t have an influential voice without having relationships. As such, the PAC allows us to build these necessary relationships
  • Investing time [working on a campaign – knocking on doors] and capital in a candidate is the most effective way to build a relationship. The PAC invests capital. Candidates often use these funds for campaigns or other vehicles to carry out the goals of his/her constituents
  • Our investments provide opportunities to educate legislators about what we do. Remember, the General Assembly is comprised of members of varying backgrounds, professions, experiences, and cultures.