Public Comment Open

Draft Final Standard for Infectious Disease Prevention: SARS-CoV-2 Virus That Causes COVID-19, 16 VAC25-220

The Department of Labor and Industry announces the publication of a Draft Final Standard for Infectious Disease Prevention: SARS-CoV-2 Virus That Causes COVID19. The Draft Final Standard takes into account the comments already received during the ongoing comment period. Please click here for more information and the ability to make a public comment.

Round Two of PPP Assistance: Economic Aid Act

On April 2, 2020, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) posted an interim final rule announcing the implementation of sections 1102 and 1106 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act).  Section 1102 of the CARES Act temporarily adds a new program, titled the “Paycheck Protection Program,” to the SBA’s 7(a) Loan Program.  Section 1106 of the CARES Act provides for forgiveness of up to the full principal amount of qualifying loans guaranteed under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

The PPP is intended to provide economic relief to small businesses nationwide adversely impacted by the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).  Subsequently, SBA published twenty-three interim final rules providing additional guidance on the PPP (some of which were jointly issued with the Department of the Treasury) and the Treasury published one interim final rule.  On December 27, 2020, the Economic Aid to Hard-Hit Small Businesses, Nonprofits, and Venues Act (Economic Aid Act) became law.  The Economic Aid Act extends the authority to make PPP loans through March 31, 2021, and revises certain PPP requirements. 

This interim final rule incorporates the Economic Aid Act amendments required to be implemented

by regulation within 10 days of enactment. 

IFR #1 (82pp)

https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PPP-IFR-Paycheck-Protection-Program-as-Amended-by-Economic-Aid-Act.pdf

IFR on Second Draw Loans (42pp)

https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PPP-IFR-Second-Draw-Loans.pdf

Guidance on accessing capital for minority underserved veteran and women owned businesses (3pp)

https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/Guidance-on-Accessing-Capital-for-Minority-Underserved-Veteran-and-Women-Owned-Business-Concerns%20.pdf

2021 Political Outlook in Virginia

On January 13th, the Virginia General Assembly will gavel into the 2021 session during an unprecedented time. As Virginia grapples with the impacts of COVID-19, legislators convened for a 65-day regular session and 84-day special session last year resembling traits of a full-time legislature. And as COVID-19 continues to snatch lives, the Virginia Senate was not immune. Senator Ben Chafin (R-Lebanon) recently succumbed to his battle with the virus.

In odd-numbered years, the General Assembly convenes for a “short session” which is 30 days as prescribed by the Constitution. Since the Constitution was amended in 1971, both political parties have voted to extend “short sessions” to 46 days. This year, Republicans announced that they will not vote for the extension which requires two-thirds approval from both chambers. In response, the Governor has stated he will call a special session at the conclusion of the 30-day regular session to finish any necessary business.

What we know is that the House of Delegates will continue to meet virtually for all its meetings and the Senate will meet in person at the Science Museum of Virginia. This adds a sharp complexity to advocacy as impromptu meetings with legislators in the hallway and office visits to discuss issues are now eliminated.  As a replacement, elbowing for Zoom meeting slots, texting, and emailing legislators will be the unfortunate norm this year as modes of communication. In conclusion, it will be paramount to make each “touch” with a legislator count and being judicious on how often we hit the “send” button on any email or text message.

Please note the following key dates of session:

  • January 13 – General Assembly session convenes
  • January 22 – Bill cut-off
  • February 9 – Bill crossover
  • February 27 – Sine die
  • April 7 – Reconvene session

AIA Virginia’s Legislative Priorities

This year, legislators will have tighter limits on the number of bills that can be submitted. Members of the House will be limited to seven bills while members of the Senate may submit 12 bills. This, combined with lawmakers meeting virtually and offsite, have led to a change in advocacy strategy this year. Due to these challenges, AIA Virginia will not file any bills this year. However, please be on the lookout for weekly General Assembly updates on the bills we are actively engaging and monitoring once session commences.

Instead, we will use this year to relentlessly focus on connecting legislators with their architect constituents – thus positioning you and our profession as a valuable resource to them. The result is that our elected officials will have a face to go with the terms “architect” and “architecture”. The AIA Virginia Advocacy Advisory Council is working on a virtual program to deploy in 2021 that will accomplish this goal. Stay tuned!

We tested this concept successfully on January 6 with Senator Ghazala Hashmi (D-Richmond). In conjunction with the American Council of Engineering Companies of Virginia, AIA Virginia held a one-hour industry roundtable discussion that covered the environment, infrastructure, schools, affordable housing, and energy. The result is that Sen. Hashmi recognizes AIA as a valuable asset on any of these topics.

Special thanks to the following roundtable participants who either live or work in Sen. Hashmi’s district:

Lori Garrett, FAIA: Senior Principal at Glave & Holmes Architects
Stephen Halsey, AIA: Principal at Moseley Architects
Burt Pinnock, FAIA: Chairman of the Board at Baskervill
Jacob Sherry, AIA: Architect at 510 Architects

These individuals were joined by Advocacy Vice President, Kathy Galvin, AIA.

Also, please support our advocacy efforts by investing in our PAC at Virginia American Institute of Architects PAC.  We can’t do the great work we are doing without your support.

2018 USBC Code Cycle Update

Every three years, Virginia goes through a code change cycle and this latest round saw a flurry of code proposals – over 320 total.  AIA Virginia was an active participant whether it was due to their own submitted code proposals or supporting or opposing other proposals.  If we were judged by our batting average, AIA VA came away with a fairly decent one (.981)!  AIA Virginia submitted 65 proposals for the upcoming 2018 USBC and the Board of Housing and Community Development (BHCD) has taken the following action:

  • Approved:           52
  • Disapproved:      1
    • it was supported by the VBCOA representative at least
  • Withdrawn:         12
    • prior to going to the BHCD
    • the majority of those were withdrawn because of approval of another code proposal described below under the VEBC – we call that a “teaser!”

52 and 1 – most people would take that record!  Below are some of the highlighted proposals that were approved, and you should see in the 2018 USBC:

Virginia Construction Code:

  • 101.5: References to the International Codes and standards now include state amendments.
  • 101.6: Provisions of the “other” codes (e.g., IMC, IPC, and NEC) now supersede any provisions of the Energy Conservation Code that address the same subject matter and impose differing requirements.
  • 1103.2.8: Deleted “exclusively” and substituted “primarily.”  This should allow for greater flexibility in use of such areas for other purposes.
  • 1109.2 and 1209.3: Multi-user gender-neutral toilet facilities have now been added to provide guidance as to the plumbing fixture ratios, compartments, and separation.
  • 2902: The entire section has been deleted with a pointer to 403 of the VPC.  This will avoid duplication and possible conflicts.
  • [The proposal that was rejected]: Attempted to delete provisions that included “where approved by the building official” as such provisions are void and unenforceable per Chapter 1 of the VCC.  The BHCD approved such deletions in the VEBC, so we are not sure why they did not approve the same for the VCC. We will try again next code cycle.

Virginia Energy Conservation Code:

  • C404.5 was deleted in its entirety as it conflicted with the VPC and created hardship in attempting compliance with the VECC.  This was one of the reasons for the code change above involving conflicts between the VECC and other codes.
  • Chapter 5 [CE] and 5 [RE] were deleted and pointers provided to go to the VEBC

Virginia Existing Building Code:

  • 102.2.3: Added clarity as to what is considered a separate building and when an existing building is separated from the new “addition” by a fire wall, any nonconformance is based on when the original building was constructed and not per the “current” code. 
    • A “Note” was added to 801.1 that indicates when a fire wall is used, and therefore, you technically do not have an addition, then Chapter 8 would not apply – thus, code officials can no longer compel you to comply with the provisions in Chapter 8, including height and area limitations in Chapter 5 of the VCC.
  • 307: Reroofing and roof repair was relocated to Section 602 and Level 1 alterations.
  • 402: Triggers for accessibility have been removed for a change of occupancy and would only be required if associated with alterations.  This is consistent now with the 2010 ADA Standards.
  • 404.3: Language now more closely matches that of the 2010 ADA Standards.
  • 510 [new]: Some energy provisions were brought over from the VECC offering some flexibility in compliance.
  • 601.2.1: Expanded the description of Level 1 alterations to include “removal without replacement” of various materials and elements.
  • 601.4: In collaboration with and support of various energy groups, the energy conservation requirements were expanded, including:
    • Opaque walls
    • Floors
    • Ceilings and vented attics
    • Fenestration
    • Roof replacement
    • Lighting
    • Ducts
  • 704: Provided clarity.
  • 802.2: Provided clarity as to what qualifies as an exception.
  • 805 [new]: Some energy provisions were brought over from the VECC offering some flexibility in compliance.
  • 904 was deleted in its entirety, with applicable portions relocated to Section 906.  This should allow for greater opportunities to alter a historic building without triggering such fire safety requirement sunless it also underwent a change of occupancy.
  • Chapter 14: Has been completely reformatted.  Duplicated provisions have been deleted (how many different ways can you say “evaluation”?).  There will now be four sections in lieu of one (General, Evaluation Process, Evaluation Data, and Evaluation Scores).
  • 1401.6.3 (current number): Clarifies that interpolation is permitted.
  • Are you sitting down for this one?!?!  There has been another major overhaul of the VEBC, specifically as it relates to alterations as follows:
    • Work area: GONE!  No more work areas – no more arguments on what is or is not a work area!
    • Level 2 alterations: Was about 12 pages long – now will be approximately 3 pages long.  Since most of Level 2 and 3 alterations were based strictly on the concept of a work area, with no more work area, a lot of provisions are not needed anymore.
    • Supplemental requirements: What supplemental requirements?
    • Level 3 alterations: Gone the way of the Dodo.
    • Relevant provisions were relocated to the Change of Occupancy chapter.
    • Why you may ask?  You were just getting use to work areas.  Well, there was this thing called “The Virginia Way” before the IEBC came along and it basically said, “if you don’t touch it, you don’t have to do anything.”  But that all changed when the IEBC came along – with its work areas, supplemental requirements, and Level 3 alterations that required alterations even beyond where you were doing work.  So, we are trying to go back to the way it was – touch it, do something – don’t touch it, you don’t have to do anything.
    • Enjoy!
  • We successfully defeated a proposal that would have expanded the definition of a “change of occupancy” to include “electrical” as one of the “greater degrees.”  This could have led to unintended consequences and slippery slopes.  We will work with the proponent during the next code cycle to see if we can come up with a compromise solution.

Virginia Plumbing Code:

  • Table 403.1: Airport terminals now have their own row and minimum plumbing fixture ratios. Locations have also been clarified.
  • 403 and 405: Multi-user gender-neutral toilet facilities have now been added to provide guidance as to the plumbing fixture ratios, compartments, and separation.

Virginia Residential Code:

  • R408: We supported revisions to the “under-floor space” provisions that reformat and clarify the provisions within this section.

AIA Virginia was also represented on the following sub-workgroups, from which a number of code changes were also submitted:

  • Fire Code edits: eliminated al construction-related provisions.
  • Resiliency: BHCD approved eight proposals.
  • Residential Uses: We now have an “Accessory Dwelling Unit” definition and provisions; and BHCD approved three other proposals, including adding “Tiny Houses” in an Appendix.
  • School safety: Emergency Supplemental Hardware (you may know it better as “door barricades”) is now permitted in K-12 and higher education occupancies.
  • Energy: BHCD approved four proposals that came out of this sub-workgroup, including making blower door tests mandatory for single- and multi-family homes and increasing ceiling insulation.

While AIA Virginia remained “neutral” or took “no position” on most of the proposals, some of the more significant approved proposals include:

  • “Tall Wood Buildings (TWB)” construction is now allowed as an alternative.
  • VRC R313.1: Townhomes must now be sprinkled in accordance with P2904, NFPA 13D 13, or 13R.
  • VRC E3902.16: Arc-fault circuit-interrupter protection is now required in additional spaces, including kitchens, family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, sunrooms, rec rooms, closets, hallways, and laundry rooms – in addition to the bedrooms.  That just about covers it!
  • Kitchen exhaust systems requirements in the VECC C403.2.8 were deleted in its entirety and the provisions of the VMC will apply (another example of where the VECC conflicted with the VMC).
  • VECC 402.1.4.2 [new section]: Expanded requirements for roof and ceiling insulation.
  • VRC R301.2.1: Wind design criteria, tables, and maps have been updated to comply with ASCE 7-16.
  • VPC 608.15 and VRC P2902.6: Revised requirements for backflow preventers.
  • VMC Table 403.3.1.1: Minimum ventilation rates have been added for “medical procedure rooms,” “patient rooms,” and “physical therapy rooms.”
  • VPC 202: A new definition has been added for “service sink.”
  • VPC 1303.1 and VRC P2912.1: CSA B805/ICC 805 Standard has been added as an alternate compliance path for rainwater to be used in nonpotable applications.
  • VCC and VPC – single-user toilet facility and bathing room fixtures: Clarifications and additional exceptions have been added.
  • NFPA 2020 Article 555: Electrical shock protections have been added for marina docks.

Anyone can access all of the proposed code changes on cdpVA.  If you do not have one already, you will need to set up a free account.

So, what do you think?  Love ‘em?  Hate ‘em?  What were they thinking?

Anyone can submit a code change, so if there is something that you would like to see changed in any of the codes, go to cdpVA and submit away (actually, it is too late for this code cycle, but when the next cycle begins . . .).  Or, you can contact AIA Virginia’s current representative, Kenney Payne at kpayne@moseleyarchitects.com, and he can help you with your proposal or submit one for you.

So, until we start this process all over again – “2021 anyone?!” – be SOS – safe, operational, and sane!

General Assembly Special Session Wrap-Up

The 2020 Special Session began on Tuesday, Aug. 18, to address the forecasted budget shortfall, impacts directly associated with COVID-19, and the ongoing calls for social and criminal justice reforms. At the start of the special session, Governor Northam introduced a budget that was crafted to meet a projected $2.7 billion revenue shortfall over the course of the current biennium. When the COVID-19 shutdown started impacting state finances, the Governor froze (unallotted) most new discretionary spending until new revenue forecasts could be obtained and the General Assembly could meet in a special session to make adjustments. When the new revenue forecasts became available, they showed that while the state’s revenues declined, it was not as dire as was originally predicted. This was most likely due to the fact that Virginia benefits from a large federal government presence which did not wane as COVID-19 appeared, and Virginia’s large technology sector was still able to operate effectively despite the closure of many physical offices.  With this information, prior to special session, the Governor proposed a revised budget. In this revised budget, the Governor balanced the budget by making most of the budget freezes (or “unallotments”) permanent, while sparingly introducing a few new spending priorities.

From a process standpoint, the special session was unlike any other before it. To ensure the safety of its members, the House moved floor sessions and all committee meetings to a virtual format. The Senate, taking a different approach, continued to meet in person for floor sessions and committee meetings, albeit in a larger temporary space inside the Science Museum of Virginia. Citizen input to the House and Senate committee meetings was limited solely to written testimony and virtual appearances via videoconference.

The Virginia General Assembly finished consideration of bills and the budget on Friday, Oct. 16, making it the same length as a traditional “long” session (60 days). The General Assembly passed bills to ban chokeholds, “no knock” warrants, and establishing minimum training standards for law enforcement agencies. They passed measures giving local government the option to create civilian review boards with subpoena power to investigate alleged police misconduct and giving the Attorney General the power to investigate allegations of systemic racism within law enforcement agencies.

Since our September legislative update, Del. Guzman’s (D-Woodbridge) paid quarantine leave (HB 5116) bill failed in the Senate Committee Commerce and Labor by a 14-1 vote. The two bills (SB 5067Saslaw and HB 5074Sullivan) that would provide businesses immunity from civil claims related to the transmission of or exposure to COVID-19 were stricken by their respective patrons after the inability to have labor and business groups reach an agreement. Lastly, Sen. Lewis’ (D-Accomac) bill (SB 5106) that would extend local land use approvals to address the pandemic passed and was signed by the Governor.

The General Assembly is now faced with only two months left to prepare for the 2021 regular session, which is scheduled to begin on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021. The House will meet virtually during session in 2021. Currently, the Senate is planning to meet socially distanced at the Science Museum of Virginia.

If you have any questions, please feel free to submit them to Corey Clayborne, FAIA at cclayborne@aiava.org

*Source: Williams Mullen

Governor’s Revenue Forecast and Budget

Virginia Releases October 2020 Revenue Report
as reported from the Office of the Governor

On a fiscal year-to-date basis, total revenue collections grew 6.7 percent, ahead of the annual forecast of a 1.8 percent decrease. General Fund revenue collections are down 2.7 percent from the previous year. Growth in sales and use taxes and recordation tax collections offset the expected decline in payroll withholding.

The Joint Advisory Board of Economists (JABE) met November 4 to assess recent economic developments and the economic outlook for the current and next biennium. The Governor’s Advisory Council on Revenue Estimates (GACRE) will meet on November 23 to evaluate both the JABE economic recommendations and revenue collections through October. GACRE members’ recommendations will be incorporated into the General Fund revenue forecast to be released on December 16 when the Governor meets with the money committees of the General Assembly.

Governor Northam Signs Revised State Budget
as reported from the Office of the Governor

Governor Ralph Northam signed House Bill 5005, Virginia’s revised biennial budget. The Governor called the General Assembly into special session on August 18 and has worked with legislative leaders to enact a spending plan that he believes protects key priorities, preserves the Commonwealth’s financial options, and addresses critical challenges that Virginians are facing amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

The signed budget finalizes previously announced funding allocations that Virginia received under the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, including:

  • Vaccination Program: $22 million for the Virginia Department of Health’s vaccination preparation and planning through the end of 2020
  • K-12 Schools: $220 million for COVID-19 preparedness and response efforts in K-12 public schools, with all 132 school districts receiving at least $100,000
  • Higher Education: $116 million to support ongoing COVID-19 response at public colleges, universities, and medical schools and $22 million for the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia to provide payments to private institutions of higher education
  • Child Care: $65.8 million to increase access to child care and continue child care incentive grant program established in April
  • Small Business Assistance: $70 million to establish the Rebuild VA economic recovery fund providing grants to small businesses and nonprofit organizations impacted by the pandemic and $30 million in additional funds to continue the program
  • Broadband Accessibility: $30 million to fast-track broadband projects in underserved localities
  • Home Health Workers: $73 million to provide hazard pay to home health personal attendants who served high-risk populations during the early months of the pandemic
  • Workforce Training for Unemployed Virginians: $30 million to established the Re-Employing Virginians initiative providing scholarships to individuals who enroll in programs in high-demand fields
  • Rent and Mortgage Relief: $12 million to expand the Virginia Rent and Mortgage Relief Program launched in June
  • Food Banks: $7 million to help Virginia food banks meet increased demand for food assistance
  • Medicaid Day Support Providers: $25 million to fund monthly retainer payments for day support programs that provide services for Virginians with developmental disabilities.
  • Free Clinics: $3 million to reimburse members of the Virginia Association of Free and Charitable Clinics for COVID-19 expenses

If you have any questions, please feel free to submit them to Corey Clayborne, FAIA at cclayborne@aiava.org

AIA Central Virginia Wins 2020 PAC Rumble in the Jungle!

Final Points Tally:
AIA Blue Ridge:                     0
AIA Central Virginia:            90
AIA Hampton Roads:            20
AIA Northern Virginia:          40
AIA Richmond:                    60

For the second time in three years, AIA Central Virginia took home the annual AIA Virginia PAC Rumble in the Jungle award. AIA Richmond led the competition nearly the entire time but could not hold off the 2020 Champions. This year, whether or not the local chapter’s Board of Directors had 100% participation in the PAC was the game-changer. Arguably the easiest requirement to satisfy, AIA Central Virginia checked that box and stormed ahead. With over 7% of its chapter investing in the PAC – the highest percent on record to date – put the competition out of reach. In the Spring, AIA Virginia will be awarding AIA Central Virginia with $1,000 for its use for Architecture Week/Month 2021.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC.  The Award has historically been presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of its respective membership.  The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

Below outlines point allocations:

  • Local component Board participation
    • Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?
      1. Yes = 20 points
      1. No = 0 points
  • Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC
    • Component with highest % = 40 points
    • Component with second highest % = 20 points
    • Component with third highest % = 10 points
  • Average investment per member from the total local component membership
    • Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
    • Component with second highest average investment/member = 30 points
    • Component with third highest average investment/member = 20 points
    • Component with fourth highest average investment/member = 10 points
    • Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Thank you to our 2020 PAC Investors:

$1,000 to $2,499
Glave & Holmes Architecture
Quinn Evans Architects
Kenney Payne, AIA

$500 to $999
Anonymous (1)
William T. Brown, AIA
Theresa del Ninno, AIA
Jeremy Maloney, AIA

$200-$499
Ron Anderson of Nello Wall Systems
Scott Campbell, AIA
R. Corey Clayborne, FAIA
Karen Conkey, AIA
Rebecca Edmunds, AIA
W. Douglas Gilpin Jr., FAIA
John Glenn, AIA
Eric Keplinger, AIA
Lou Wolf, AIA

$100-$199
Anonymous (1)
KGD Architecture
Reader & Swartz Architects
Paul Battaglia, AIA
JW Blanchard, AIA
Tim Colley, AIA
Robert Dunay, FAIA
Thomas Ellis, AIA
Eliza Engle, AIA
Ed Gillikin, AIA
Jeanne LeFever, AIA
Sandra Leibowitz, AIA
Shawn Mulligan, AIA
Laura Ours, AIA
Gregory Powe, AIA
Beth Reader, FAIA
Sean Reilly, AIA
Robert Reis, AIA
J. Mitchell Rowland, III, AIA
Nick Serfass, FAIA
Elisabeth Sloan, AIA
Christine Snetter, AIA
Michael Spory, Assoc. AIA
Chris Venable, AIA
Nick Vlattas, FAIA
Stephen Wakeman, AIA
Stephen Weisensale, AIA
Dan Zimmerman, AIA 

Up to $99
Anonymous (21)
Ryan Alkire, AIA
Krystal Anderson, AIA
Kelly Batchelder of Nello Wall Systems
Barbara Benesh, AIA
Marcos Borjas, Assoc. AIA
Scott Boyce, AIA
Ashleigh Brewer, Assoc. AIA
Jason Bryan, AIA
John Burns, FAIA
Kelly Callahan, AIA
Mayda Colon, AIA
Nick Cooper, AIA
Phoebe Crisman, AIA
Manoj Dalaya, FAIA
April Drake, AIA
Robert Easter, FAIA
Jori Erdman, AIA
Keesha Ezell
Braden Field, AIA
Kathy Galvin, AIA
Lynden Garland, AIA
Rhea George, Hon. AIA VA
Cathy Guske, Hon. AIA VA
Meagan Jancy, AIA
Lisa Jolley, CDFA
Stephen Kulinski, AIA
Spencer Lepler, AIA
George Logusch, AIA
Joe McCoy, AIA
Andrew McKinley, AIA
T.J. Meehan, AIA
Jonathan Moore, AIA
John Mott, FAIA
Jo Anne Murray, AIA
Kendall Nicholson, Assoc. AIA
Michael Poole, AIA
Nea May Poole, AIA
Gareth Ratti, AIA
Susan Reed, AIA
Joshua Rubbelke, AIA
Maury Saunders, AIA
Amanda Schlichting, AIA
James Scruggs, AIA
Damian Seitz, AIA
Jacob Sherry, AIA
Lauren Shirley, AIA
Catherine Smith, Assoc. AIA
Greg Stephenson, AIA
Charles Todd, AIA
Mark Treon, AIA
Nick Wade, AIA
Chris Warren, Assoc. AIA
Ed Weaver, AIA
Rob Winstead, AIA

AIA Richmond Continues its Pace in the RUMBLE in the JUNGLE

Winner gets $1,000 for 2021 Architecture Week

Scoreboard:

AIA Blue Ridge:                   20
AIA Central Virginia:            20
AIA Hampton Roads:            40
AIA Northern Virginia:          10
AIA Richmond:                    80

Like many professions, architects have interests that specifically impact our profession, practice, and our community. The legislative and regulatory environment is arguably the most important arena that impacts how we provide our professional services.  We, as architects, want to have an influential voice in this arena which allows us to control our destiny.  We can’t have an influential voice without having relationships. As such, the PAC allows us to build these necessary relationships.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC.  The Award has historically been presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of its respective membership.  The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

Below outlines point allocations:

  1. Local component Board participation
    1. Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?
      • Yes = 20 points
      • No = 0 points
  2. Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC
    • Component with highest % = 40 points
    • Component with second highest % = 20 points
    • Component with third highest % = 10 points
  3. Average investment per member from the total local component membership
    • Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
    • Component with second highest average investment/member = 30 points
    • Component with third highest average investment/member = 20 points
    • Component with fourth highest average investment/member = 10 points
    • Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

The scoring will be closed on October 23, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Thank you to our 2020 PAC Investors:

$1,000 to $2,499

Glave & Holmes Architecture
Kenney Payne, AIA

$500 to $999

William T. Brown, AIA
Jeremy Maloney, AIA

$200-$499

Ron Anderson of Nello Wall Systems
Scott Campbell, AIA
R. Corey Clayborne, FAIA
Karen Conkey, AIA
Theresa del Ninno, AIA
Rebecca Edmunds, AIA
John Glenn, AIA
Lou Wolf, AIA

$100-$199

JW Blanchard, AIA
Robert Dunay, FAIA
Thomas Ellis, AIA
Eliza Engle, AIA
Jeanne LeFever, AIA
Beth Reader, FAIA
Sean Reilly, AIA
Robert Reis, AIA
J. Mitchell Rowland, III, AIA
Nick Serfass, FAIA
Michael Spory, Assoc. AIA
Nick Vlattas, FAIA
Stephen Wakeman, AIA
Stephen Weisensale, AIA 

Up to $99

Anonymous (5)
Krystal Anderson, AIA
Kelly Batchelder of Nello Wall Systems
Barbara Benesh, AIA
John Burns, FAIA
Mayda Colon, AIA
Nick Cooper, AIA
Phoebe Crisman, AIA
Manoj Dalaya, FAIA
April Drake, AIA
Robert Easter, FAIA
Jori Erdman, AIA
Keesha Ezell
Braden Field, AIA
Kathy Galvin, AIA
Rhea George, Hon. AIA VA
Cathy Guske, Hon. AIA VA
Lisa Jolley, CDFA
Stephen Kulinski, AIA
Spencer Lepler, AIA
Joe McCoy, AIA
Andrew McKinley, AIA
T.J. Meehan, AIA
Jonathan Moore, AIA
Susan Reed, AIA
Joshua Rubbelke, AIA
Maury Saunders, AIA
Amanda Schlichting, AIA
James Scruggs, AIA
Charles Todd, AIA
Nick Wade, AIA
Chris Warren, Assoc. AIA
Ed Weaver, AIA
Rob Winstead, AIA

Virginia Revenue Forecast and General Assembly Special Session Update

On Friday, October 16, the General Assembly’s Special Session went into recess. It did not adjourn. This allows the Governor to modify the budget to enact the redistricting constitutional amendment on November’s ballot if it passes.

Since our September legislative update, Del. Guzman’s (D-Woodbridge) paid quarantine leave (HB 5116) bill failed in the Senate Committee Commerce and Labor by a 14-1 vote. The two bills (SB 5067Saslaw and HB 5074Sullivan) that would provide businesses immunity from civil claims related to the transmission of or exposure to COVID-19 were stricken by their respective patrons after the inability to have labor and business groups reach an agreement. Lastly, Sen. Lewis’ (D-Accomac) bill (SB 5106) that would extend local land use approvals to address the pandemic has passed the House and Senate and awaiting the signature of the Governor.

Virginia Releases September 2020 Revenue Report

as reported from the Office of the Governor

Governor Ralph Northam announced that September General Fund revenue increased 7.6 percent from the previous year, driven by growth in payroll withholding, corporate, and recordation tax collections.  The Governor reported that Virginia’s General Fund revenues are increasing, and the Commonwealth has been able to avoid the major revenue shocks that other states are experiencing because of the ongoing pandemic. This is the result of the proactive measures Virginia has taken to mitigate the impacts of the virus on the state’s economy and put the Commonwealth on the path toward a strong recovery.

With September marking the end of the first quarter of fiscal year 2021, Secretary of Finance Aubrey Layne, reported this quarter’s revenue performance confirms that the Commonwealth took a measured and prudent path in the updated Interim Forecast released in August.

With one more deposit day than September of last year, payroll withholding grew 11.4 percent for the month. Furthermore, the first non-withholding estimated payment for fiscal year 2021 was due in September. Collections in non-withholding grew 2.4 percent over last year. Collections of sales and use taxes, reflecting August sales, fell 3.2 percent in September—almost all of the decline is due to accelerated sales tax (AST) refunds. As with non-withholding, the due date for the first estimated payment for corporate income tax collections for the fiscal year was also due in September. Collections of corporate income tax increased 17.4 percent in September from September of last year. Finally, collections of wills, suits, deeds, and contracts—mainly recordation tax collections—were $56.6 million in September, compared with $36.6 million in September of last year.   

On a fiscal year-to-date basis, total revenue collections rose 9.9 percent, well ahead of the annual forecast of a 1.8 percent decrease. On a fiscal year-to-date basis, collections of payroll withholding taxes—63 percent of General Fund revenues—increased 2.4 percent, equal to the annual estimate. Year-to-date non-withholding collections were $982.4 million compared with $617.6 million in the same period last year, increasing by 59.1 percent, ahead of the annual estimate of a 3.6 percent decline. Sales tax collections—16 percent of General Fund revenues—increased 7.5 percent through September, ahead of the annual forecast calling for a 9.7 percent decrease. Through the first quarter of the fiscal year, corporate income tax collections rose 36.1 percent from the same period last year, ahead of the annual estimate of a 3.0 percent increase. Finally, collections of wills, suits, deeds, and contracts were up 35.9 percent in the first quarter, well ahead of the forecasted 12.6 percent decline.   

If you have any questions, please feel free to submit them to Corey Clayborne, FAIA at cclayborne@aiava.org

AIA Richmond Widens Lead in the RUMBLE in the JUNGLE

Winner gets $1,000 for 2021 Architecture Week

Like many professions, architects have interests that specifically impact our profession, practice, and our community. The legislative and regulatory environment is arguably the most important arena that impacts how we provide our professional services.  We, as architects, want to have an influential voice in this arena which allows us to control our destiny.  We can’t have an influential voice without having relationships. As such, the PAC allows us to build these necessary relationships.

The AIA Virginia PAC Award looks to celebrate the engagement and commitment of a local AIA component who supports the advancement and mission of the PAC.  The Award has historically been presented at Architecture Exchange East to the local component’s Board of Directors who will accept the award on behalf of the its respective membership.  The Award criteria is based on a point total calculation based on three areas: local component Board participation, percentage of local component’s membership who have invested in the PAC, and total amount of money invested by the members of the local component.

Below outlines point allocations:

  1. Local component Board participation
    • Did 100% of the Board of Directors invest into the AIA Virginia PAC?
      • Yes = 20 points
      • No = 0 points
  2. Percentage of local component’s members who have invested in the AIA Virginia PAC
    • Component with highest % = 40 points
    • Component with second highest % = 20 points
    • Component with third highest % = 10 points
  3. Average investment per member from the total local component membership
    • Component with highest average investment/member = 40 points
    • Component with second highest average investment/member = 30 points
    • Component with third highest average investment/member = 20 points
    • Component with fourth highest average investment/member = 10 points
    • Component with fifth highest average investment/member = 0 points

The scoring will be closed on October 23, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

Invest at www.aiavapac.org

Thank you to our 2020 PAC Investors:

$1,000 to $2,499
Glave & Holmes Architecture
Kenney Payne, AIA

$500 to $999
Jeremy Maloney, AIA

$200-$499
Ron Anderson of Nello Wall Systems
Scott Campbell, AIA
R. Corey Clayborne, FAIA
Karen Conkey, AIA
Theresa del Ninno, AIA
Rebecca Edmunds, AIA
John Glenn, AIA
Lou Wolf, AIA

$100-$199
JW Blanchard, AIA
Thomas Ellis, AIA
Eliza Engle, AIA
Jeanne LeFever, AIA
Beth Reader, FAIA
Sean Reilly, AIA
Robert Reis, AIA
J. Mitchell Rowland, III, AIA
Michael Spory, Assoc. AIA
Nick Vlattas, FAIA
Stephen Weisensale, AIA 

Up to $99
Anonymous (3)
Krystal Anderson, AIA
Kelly Batchelder of Nello Wall Systems
Barbara Benesh, AIA
Mayda Colon, AIA
Phoebe Crisman, AIA
Manoj Dalaya, FAIA
April Drake, AIA
Robert Easter, FAIA
Jori Erdman, AIA
Keesha Ezell
Kathy Galvin, AIA
Rhea George, Hon. AIA VA
Cathy Guske, Hon. AIA VA
Stephen Kulinski, AIA
Spencer Lepler, AIA
Andrew McKinley, AIA
Jonathan Moore, AIA
Susan Reed, AIA
Joshua Rubbelke, AIA
Maury Saunders, AIA
Charles Todd, AIA
Chris Warren, Assoc. AIA
Ed Weaver, AIA
Rob Winstead, AIA