Advocacy Update

The gears of government are turning and our advocacy efforts are making a difference.

At the federal level, you likely heard that HR7024 passed. That omnibus tax bill addresses many issues, including the current requirement that Research & Development (R&D) expenditures be amortized over five years. The proposed legislation allows taxpayers to take the full credit for R&D expenses in the year they are incurred, retroactive to 2022 and through 2025. Many thanks to the firms and members that answered the call to engage and asked your Representative to support the legislation. One hurdle crossed. On to the Senate; where the Resolution is likely to need help. Stay vigilant.

Here in Virginia…

You might have heard about the effort to reopen the 2021 Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code pursuant to the recent Notice of Intended Regulatory Action (NOIRA) for the purpose of complying with Executive Orders One and 19 (2022). Executive Directive Number One (2022), directs Executive Branch entities under the authority of the Governor “…to initiate regulatory processes to reduce by at least 25 percent the number of regulations not mandated by federal or state statute, in consultation with the Office of the Attorney General, and in a manner consistent with the laws of the Commonwealth”.  Executive Order 19 (2022) requires every regulatory agency “to review all existing regulations…to reduce the overall regulatory burden on the public.” AIA Virginia was one of 33 signatories to a letter voicing opposition to the proposal to apply these requirements to the Building Code. During its meeting on Wednesday 31 January 2024, the Board of Housing and Community Development voted against reopening the 2021 code cycle; the vote was 10-3. Our comments, both written and oral, were recognized by the Board during the Codes and Standards meeting.  The Board’s motion, as passed, also recognized the successful past work on the 2021 code cycle and recommended that the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development develop a plan for the 2024 code cycle with consideration for compliance with ED One (2022) and EO 19 (2022). Further action on the 2024 cycle will require discussion in a future meeting. We will be ready.

The Virginia General Assembly is well underway. Bills are working their way through, or succumbing to, the process. We have been issuing frequent reports on the bills we are tracking. Please join me in expressing gratitude to the members of the Joint Legislative Committee (the JLC) for their attention and diligence. The AIA Virginia delegation includes Rebecca Aarons-Sydnor, Assoc AIA, Ed Gillikin, AIA, Lauren Sughrue, Assoc AIA, and Stephen Weisensale, AIA; they are joined by ACEC Virginia delegates Kristina Preisner, Executive Director of ACEC, Eric Burke, Hugh Cannon, Nancy Israel, R Reaves, Glenn Rehberger, Don Rissmeyer, Chris Stone; our lobbyist Patrick Cushing, Esq, Hon AIA Virginia, and our loyal ally Joe Cooch, Esq.

No advocacy update is complete without an appeal to please support the AIA Virginia PAC – one of the sharpest instruments in our toolbox. And if you are supporting the PAC, we thank you.

Advocacy Town Hall: a mid-session zoom update

Ever wondered about the purpose and function of the Advocacy Advisory Council, or the Joint Legislative Committee? And how, or if, those concern the AIA Virginia Political Action Committee? And how do those elements coordinate with other components of our organization? Or with the members?

An overview of our advocacy efforts at both the state and federal level will be offered during a Zoom town hall on Friday 16 February 2024 between 3 and 4 pm – a date that happens to coincide nicely with “Crossover” at the Virginia General Assembly.

We will provide an up-to-the-minute update on the bills we are tracking in the Virginia General Assembly. And an overview of the issues we intend to address during our “Hill Day” visit to the Capitol in DC during the AIA Leadership Summit on Wednesday 28 February 2024. I hope you will join us for this discussion.

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Political Outlook in VA

The 2024 Virginia General Assembly gavels into session Wednesday 10 January and the Joint Legislative Committee (JLC) is prepped and ready to go. We have already begun to review the bills and will soon be developing our response. Reports will be issued weekly – using an improved nomenclature that will make it easier to follow the progress (and the fate) of the legislation we are tracking. Please read the summaries and contact Paul Battaglia, pbattaglia@aiava.org with your observations about how the proposed legislation might affect you or your practice. Recommendations for how to improve/amend a bill are always welcome.

In addition to our efforts in Virginia, we will be headed north to advocate at the federal level. Hill Day is scheduled for Wednesday 28 February during the AIA Leadership Summit in DC (TU 27 FEB to FRI 1 MAR).

Advocacy Efforts

While our advocacy efforts occur throughout the year, there is particular attention given to the time just before the Virginia General Assembly gavels into session.  Accordingly, the Joint Legislative Committee – the JLC, which operates in cooperation with ACEC Virginia – is getting organized and oriented.

It is impossible to generate an infallible forecast of the full range of efforts that may be required to respond to the opportunities and challenges of any single session. (That’s part of the fun.) This year, with so many new legislators (an effective turnover rate of almost 35 percent in the House of Delegates and 45 percent in the Senate), might be even more interesting than most. We’ll be ready.

Our state-level efforts will be complemented by vigilance and advocacy at the national level, including our participation in the AIA Leadership Summit in DC (27 February to 1 March), which includes an opportunity to advocate on the Big Hill.

We look forward to successfully addressing all matters of interest to the practice of architecture and the operation of a professional service business in Virginia.

You can support our efforts by:

  • maintaining your vigilance (our weekly updates during the session will keep you posted)
  • sharing your thoughts/concerns on the issues
  • being available to consult on how proposed legislation might affect your practice/business
  • serving as an SME to help the JLC better understand the issues and/or impact of a bill
  • recommending improvements/refinements to bills
  • investing in the AIA Virginia PAC

You might also consider serving on the Joint Legislative Committee, the Advocacy Advisory Council, or the Board of Trustees for the AIA Virginia PAC. Email PBattaglia@aiava.org if interested.

Here we go!

The General Assembly is (Almost) a Wrap

The Budget has not been resolved. The “Veto Session” is scheduled for 12 April. And the Governor could convene a special session. But many have already remarked that this General Assembly session was generally, and comparatively, “quiet”.

Even so, the bills concerning deregulation and universal licensure reminded us of the importance of remaining vigilant and the value of engaging a strong and effective lobbyist. (Great work, Patrick Cushing. Thank you.)

With more than a few high-profile retirements, with every seat in both chambers up for election, and with the possibility that some (perhaps many) of the seats will be filled by freshman legislators, next year’s session is anticipated to be far more “entertaining”.

We will be ready.

That durable readiness depends on not only recharging our PAC investments (donate to the PAC) but also organizing our efforts to educate legislators on the topics of Qualifications-Based Selection (QBS), the most appropriate mode of enacting requirements (through either the legislative or the regulatory process), and the unique and substantial ways that architects contribute to the built environment throughout the Commonwealth. If you are interested in collaborating on that effort, please read this item on the upcoming Advocacy Summit.

2023 Legislative Outlook in Virginia

On January 11th, the 2023 Virginia General Assembly gaveled into a 46-day “short session”. Republicans hold all three statewide offices (Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and Attorney General) and a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates. Democrats hold a 22-18 majority in the Senate.

The key dates of the session:

  • January 11 – General Assembly session convenes
  • January 20 – Bill cut-off (last day to introduce bills and certain joint resolutions)
  • February 7 – Bill crossover (last day for each house to act on its own legislation)
  • February 25 – Session adjourns sine die
  • March 27 – Last day for Governor’s action on legislation
  • April 12 – Reconvened session

AIA Virginia’s Legislative Priorities

AIA Virginia did not introduce any legislation this year, but we will be closely following legislation related to Resiliency, Comprehensive Regional Planning, Professional Licensure, Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits, Affordable Housing, and the Virginia Public Procurement Act.

Please support our advocacy efforts by investing in the PAC at aiavapac.org.  We can’t do the great work we are doing without your support.

And watch your inbox for weekly updates on bills we are actively working on or monitoring.

AIA Virginia General Assembly Update

We have just reached the halfway marker of the General Assembly. The “Crossover” date of February 15 occurred this week which was the last day for the House and Senate to act on its own legislation. If a bill did not get a hearing before this date, it automatically dies.

Please find below the bills that AIA Virginia is tracking “Actively” and “Monitoring”.  The bills of interest that did not pass this year are listed under the “Dead” category.


ACTIVE

These bills are being actively lobbied by Williams Mullen, AIA Virginia, and ACEC Virginia. This does not necessarily mean we are testifying before committees on all of these bills. It could mean that we are engaged in conversations with bill patrons or other industries that can alter the legislation’s outcome.

HB 282 – Coyner – Criminal records; effect of criminal convictions on licensure, data to be included in report.

HB 429 – Bulova – Virginia Public Procurement Act; architectural and professional engineering term contracting. [AIA/ACEC Bill – Passed House 99-0]

HB 816 – Torian – Va. Public Procurement Act; any bid or offer under Act to identify all subcontractors.

HB 881 – Fowler – Contracts; payment clauses to be included, right to payment of subcontractors.

SB 225 – McPike – Virginia Public Procurement Act; architectural and professional engineering term contracting. [AIA/ACEC Bill – Passed Senate 38-0]

SB 290 – Favola – State agencies and localities; solar-ready roof requirements, etc.


MONITOR

AIA Virginia is watching bills placed in this category.  Often, we are watching bills because they are of interest and we want to remain informed.  When this is the case, it is often another organization taking the lead due to its specific expertise and political relationships.  If amendments are introduced that make a bill in this category detrimental to our profession, then it is moved to the ACTIVE list and we engage.  There are some bills that AIA Virginia does not take a position on.  An example of this would be bills that define “small business”.  Because of the composition of our membership, we would not want to take an action that would hurt any of our members.

HB 5 – Morefield – Flood Relief Fund; established.

HB 19 – Fowler – Virginia Public Procurement Act; public higher educational institutions, disclosure by offerors.

HB 73 – Ware – Electric utilities; definitions, aggregate capacity requirements for renewable energy facilities.

HB 74 – Ware – Va. Clean Economy Act; non-bypassable charges, energy-intensive trade-exposed (EITE) industries

HB 101 – Head – Group health benefit plans; sponsoring associations, formation of benefits consortium. (Similar bills: HB 245, HB 884, HB 1169 )

HB 208 – Webert – Regulatory Innovation, Department of and Virginia Regulatory Sandbox Program; created, report.

HB 221 – Davis – STEM+C; included in Standards of Learning.

HB 244 – Webert – Regulatory Budget Program; DPB to establish a continuous Program, report.

HB 282 – Coyner – Criminal records; effect of criminal convictions on licensure, data to be included in report.

HB 332 – Head – Income tax, state and corporate; credit for small businesses.

HB 474 – Brewer – Automatic fire sprinkler inspectors; certification, exempts building officials and fire officials.

HB 516 – Bulova – Flood resiliency & protection; implements recom. from first Va. Coastal Resilience Master Plan.

HB 517 – Bulova – Chief Resilience Officer; clarifies designation and role.

HB 563 – O’Quinn – School Construction Matching Grant Fund and Program; established, funding sources.

HB 741 – Bell – Annual public elementary and secondary school safety audits; creation or review of school building.

HB 818 – Torian – Virginia Public Procurement Act; prompt payment of bills by state agencies, etc.

HB 820 – Torian – Small Business and Supplier Diversity, Department of; disparity study.

HB 847 – Bloxom – Coastal Virginia Resiliency Authority; established, report.

HB 903 – Lopez – Virginia Green Infrastructure Bank; created.

HB 1006 – Brewer – Income tax, state and corporate; deductions for business interest.

HB 1161 – McGuire – Virginia Public Procurement Act; required contract provisions, prohibition.

HB 1210 – Hope – Historic preservation; filing of a historic designation application.

HB 1225 – Bulova – Energy performance-based contracts; roof replacement.

HB 1287 – Runion – Virginia Public Procurement Act; preference for recycled materials.

HB 1289 – Head – Uniform Statewide Building Code; exemption for certain use and occupancy classifications.

HB 1301 – Kilgore – Clean Energy and Community Flood Preparedness Act; repeals Act.

HB 1309 – Bulova – Resilient Virginia Revolving Loan Fund.

HB 1310 – Shin – Virginia Public Procurement Act; moderate-risk contracts; federal General Services Administration.

HB 1325 – Reid – Local governments; additional powers, Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy financing programs.

HJ 16 – Hodges – Coastal Flooding, Joint Subcommittee studying; continued, appropriation.

SB 94 – Howell – Internal Revenue Code; conformity of the Commonwealth’s taxation system.

SB 117 – Newman – Local school divisions; budget bill to include appropriation of surplus for operational costs.

SB 121 – Hackworth – Contractors; exemption from licensure for work providing remodeling, etc., valued at $25,000, etc.

SB 153 – Locke – Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Secretary of; created.

SB 195 – Mason – Group health benefit plans; bona fide associations, formation of benefits consortium. [Similar bill: SB 549]

SB 210 – Petersen – Virginia Public Procurement Act; public higher educational institutions, disclosure by offerors.

SB 276 – Stanley – School boards; unexpended local funds for capital projects.

SB 288 – Ebbin – Income tax, state and corporate; deduction for business interest disallowed.

SB 400 – Hanger – Agritourism event buildings; authorizes the BHCD to promulgate regulations related to buildings.

SB 409 – Morrissey – Criminal convictions; effect on licensure, date to be included in biennial report.

SB 471 – McClellan – Literary Fund; open application process for loans, maximum loan amounts, etc.

SB 472 – McClellan – Retail sales & use tax, additional local; use of revenues for construction or renovation of schools.

SB 473 – McClellan – School Construction Fund and Program; created and established.

SB 481 – McClellan – School boards and local governing bodies; unexpended local funds, etc.

SB 550 – Bell – Virginia Public Procurement Act; payment clauses to be included in contracts; right to payment.

SB 551 – Marsden – Flood resiliency & protection; implements recom. from first Va. Coastal Resilience Master Plan.

SB 732 – Lewis – Climate resilience; locality’s comprehensive plan to consider strategies to address.


DEAD

The following depicts the bills of interest to AIA Virginia that were introduced but were not successful.  This list is expected to grow as the General Assembly advances. 

HB 12 – Anderson – Public school buildings; limits entry points, screening individuals.

HB 119 – March – Public-Private Competition Act; created, repeals Competitive Government Act, etc.

HB 251 – Simonds – School boards and local governing bodies; unexpended local funds, etc.

HB 252 – Simonds – School division maintenance reserve tool; Department of Education to develop or adopt and maintain.

HB 253 – Simonds – Literary Fund; open application process for loans, maximum loan amounts, etc.

HB 254 – Simonds – School Construction Fund and Program; created and established.

HB 273 – McNamara – Income tax, state; subtractions and deductions related to Paycheck Protection Program loans.

HB 295 – McNamara – Income tax, corporate; reduces tax from its current rate.

HB 352 – Watts – Income tax, state and corporate; business interest.

HB 364 – Willett – Regional planning; climate resilience to be included as part of strategic plans.

HB 374 – Williams Graves – Virginia Public Procurement Act; construction contracts, requirement to submit list.

HB 379 – Sullivan – Energy benchmarking; access to data on energy usage in certain buildings, civil penalty.

HB 471 – Subramanyam – State agencies and localities; solar-ready roof requirements, etc.

HB 531 – Hudson – Sales and use tax, additional local; revenues to support construction or renovation of schools.

HB 602 – Hayes – Flood Control, Department of, and Commonwealth Flood Plan; created, report.

HB 608 – Bourne – School boards; unexpended local funds for capital projects.

HB 701 – Kory – Uniform Statewide Building Code; local building codes and regulations, etc.

HB 707 – Keam – Transportation funding; statewide prioritization process, resiliency.

HB 757 – Krizek – Employment; anti-harassment training requirement.

HB 905 – Lopez – Energy efficiency standards; more stringent energy efficiency requirements.

HB 966 – Subramanyam – Va. Public Procurement Act; executive branch agencies’ goals for participation by small businesses.

HB 967 – Subramanyam – General Services, Department of; point-based program for prime contractors.

HB 998 – Kory – Building energy use intensity; reporting, reduction, requirements, incentive programs.

HB 999 – Maldonado – New structures; construction evaluation of impact of types of electricity.

HB 1099 – LaRock – Retail sales & use tax, additional local; use of revenues for construction or renovation of schools.

HB 1100 – LaRock – Public elementary and secondary school buildings; standards for maintenance, operations, etc.

HB 1219 – Lopez – Historic rehabilitation tax credit.

HB 1253 – Fowler – Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation; licensure by apprenticeship.

SB 15 – Favola – Insurance; paid family leave.

SB 239 – Hashmi – STEM+C; included in Standards of Learning. 

SB 452 – Boysko – Local governments; additional powers, energy efficiency of buildings.

SB 532 – Stuart – Clean Energy and Community Flood Preparedness Act; repeals Act.

SB 540 – Peake – Income tax, state and corporate; credit for small businesses.

SB 569 – Kiggans – Coastal Virginia Resiliency Authority; established.

SB 603 – Stanley – Public elementary and secondary school buildings; standards for maintenance, operations, etc.

SB 734 – Ruff – Va. Public Procurement Act; population thresholds for architectural & prof. engineering contracting.

SB 747 – McDougle – Uniform Statewide Building Code; religious exemptions.

If you have any questions, please feel free to submit them to Corey Clayborne, FAIA at cclayborne@aiava.org

2022 Political Outlook in Virginia

On January 12th, the Virginia General Assembly gaveled into the 2022 session. In even-numbered years, the General Assembly convenes for a “long session” which is 60 days as prescribed by the Constitution. The COVID-19 pandemic still looms, but legislative business will be conducted in person with protective protocols.

A year ago, Democrats controlled both chambers and the Governor’s mansion making significant advancements in their legislative agenda without any legitimate opposition. However, the November elections cast a new narrative for this year. Republicans flipped the House of Delegates, commanding a 52-48 majority, and swept all three statewide offices (Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and Attorney General). Democrats still hold a narrow 21-19 majority in the Senate. However, all it takes is one Democrat to break ranks and the scales tilt the other way with a Republican Lieutenant Governor casting tie-breaking votes.

Please note the following key dates of the session:

  • January 12 – General Assembly session convenes
  • January 21 – Bill cut-off (last day to introduce bills and certain joint resolutions)
  • February 15 – Bill crossover (last day for each house to act on its own legislation)
  • March 12 – Session adjourns sine die
  • April 11 – Last day for Governor’s action on legislation
  • April 27 – Reconvened session

AIA Virginia’s Legislative Priorities

AIA Virginia will be introducing HB 429 carried by Del. David Bulova (D-Fairfax) which drastically simplifies the Virginia Public Procurement Act regarding architectural and engineering term contracts. The bill provides that the sum of all projects performed in an architectural and professional engineering contract term shall not exceed $10 million, and the fee for any single project shall not exceed $2.5 million. In addition, the bill allows a contract for multiple architectural or professional engineering projects to be renewable for up to three additional terms at the option of the public body. Currently, there are numerous project and fee limits based on locality population size, type of work, and a host of other factors. The companion to this bill is SB 225 carried by Sen. Jeremy McPike (D-Woodbridge).

In addition, we have played a strong supporting role in the legislature’s bipartisan Commission on School Construction and Modernization. Several of the Commission’s recommendations are being presented as bills in which we will be prepared to lend our support as needed. Finally, as a follow-up to our inaugural ARCHITECTS Speak Up! event last year, we will be following legislation related to the program’s key topics of Design of Healthy and Safe Schools; Energy Efficiency and Sustainability in the Built Environment; and the Design of Affordable Housing.

Please support our advocacy efforts by investing in our PAC at Virginia American Institute of Architects PAC.  We can’t do the great work we are doing without your support.

AIA Virginia General Assembly Wrap Up

On February 8th, the 2021 General Assembly session adjourned sine die. Nearly immediately thereafter, the General Assembly convened a Special Session on February 10th which adjourned sine die on March 1st.  The General Assembly considered 1,476 pieces of legislation, which is well short of the 2,000-3,000 bills typically considered. This decrease was due to the bill limits set by each body, 7 bills for each House member, and 12 bills for each Senate member.

This General Assembly session was unique in other ways as well. For example, the House of Delegates adopted an entirely virtual format, which had members participating remotely from their home districts. The Senate of Virginia opted for a hybrid model and conducted in-person floor sessions and committee meetings at the Science Museum of Virginia. For both bodies, public participation in committee and subcommittee meetings was limited to virtual testimony. This means that lobbying consisted solely of communication through text messaging, calls, and videoconferences.

Week after week, you saw the bills that we were actively engaging and monitoring. As such, this article will focus on the three main legislative victories for our organization this session.

Defeat of HB 2259 – Governor; issuance of licenses to persons denied by regulatory board

This bill provides that the Governor may issue a license of the kind granted by a regulatory board under the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation or the Department of Health Professions to any person whose application for such license to such board has been denied. AIA Virginia believes that the process in place for regulating architecture should not be circumvented. It has successfully served in protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the general public as it takes into consideration the education, experience, and examination required for licensure. We actively opposed this legislation and it was successfully defeated.

An active stakeholder on HB 5002Establish Small Business & Women-owned & Minority-Owned Business Procurement Enhancement Programs.

Governor Ralph Northam announced the results of the Commonwealth’s disparity study, which demonstrate the need for the narrowly tailored race – and gender-conscious measures to increase equitable opportunities for women – and minority-owned businesses in state contracting. The outcomes of the study will guide the Northam Administration’s ongoing work with General Assembly leaders to increase supplier diversity and equity in the state procurement process. Read the executive summary of the 2020 disparity study here.

AIA Virginia supported this legislation, however it did not pass in its current form. Due to our support, the Administration has committed to giving AIA Virginia a seat at the table during the discussions to retool the legislation for reintroduction.

That’s right.

We will be at the table on this very important piece of the equity discussion.

Tax Conformity via HB 1935 and SB 1146

Each year the General Assembly decides which federal tax provisions the Commonwealth will conform to so Virginians know which provisions apply when filing their state income tax returns. Because of the pandemic, Congress passed numerous federal tax changes in the CARES Act and Consolidated Appropriations Act to provide immediate relief to struggling employers.

Specifically, two tax provisions were provided to PPP loan recipients 1) forgiven loans would not be taxable and 2) business expenses paid with those loan proceeds could be deducted.

Both bills included the income exclusion provision. There was a question regarding what to include regarding deductibility [$25,000 in one bill vs. $100,000 in the other bill]. AIA Virginia was part of a 43-Member Coalition that successfully advocated for the $100,000 deduction cap. This provides full deductibility to almost 80% of Virginia businesses who received a PPP loan.

These three victories are quite substantial in any legislative environment, notwithstanding a virtual General Assembly. Please continue to support our efforts by investing in our PAC at www.aiavapac.org.

Every investment matters!

If you have any questions, please reach out to Executive Vice President, Corey Clayborne, FAIA at cclayborne@aiava.org

AIA Virginia General Assembly Update

The regular session adjourned sine die on Monday, February 8th. Governor Northam called a Special Session immediately following which commenced on that Wednesday and will adjourn sine die on Monday, March 1.

ICYMI: Governor Ralph Northam announced the results of the Commonwealth’s disparity study, which demonstrate the need for narrowly tailored race- and gender-conscious measures to increase equitable opportunities for woman- and minority-owned businesses in state contracting. The outcomes of the study will guide the Northam Administration’s ongoing work with General Assembly leaders to increase supplier diversity and equity in the state procurement process. Read the executive summary of the 2020 disparity study here.

To encourage woman- and minority-owned business participation in the procurement process, the Commonwealth will support a substitute to House Bill 1784, patroned by Delegates Jeion Ward and Rodney Willett and Senators Jennifer McClellan and Mamie Locke. This bill would establish an overall goal of 23.1 percent discretionary spending with woman- and minority-owned businesses. This percentage represents the average of the participation of woman- and minority-owned businesses in state procurement work over the past five years and their availability for state procurement work. This would apply to discretionary spending in categories from which the Commonwealth derives procurement orders, prime contracts, and subcontracts. This legislation also codifies Governor Northam’s goal of procuring at least 42 percent discretionary spending from SWaM-certified businesses.

In addition, the bill establishes a new division at the Department of Small Business and Supplier Diversity (DSBSD) that will work closely with the Department of General Services (DGS), Virginia’s primary procurement agency, to ensure that the SWaM-certified business goal of 42 percent and the woman- and minority-owned business goal of 23.1 percent are met each year, and there is appropriate monitoring of prime contractor compliance.

The study found that 13.4 percent of total state contracts were awarded to woman- and minority-owned businesses from 2014 to 2019. The most recent disparity study was published in 2011, found that only 2.82 percent of all state contracts were awarded to woman- and minority-owned businesses. While these results show improvement, the 2020 study also found that woman- and minority-owned businesses would be expected to receive 32.8 percent of state contracting dollars based on their availability to provide goods and services to the Commonwealth, demonstrating that there is more work to do.

The full results from the 2020 disparity study are available here.

The substitute bill is HB 5002 in which we have been working with the Administration to ensure that there is more equity in contract awards and administered in a way that can be fairly and effectively implemented.

Below, you will find an update of the organization’s “Active”, “Monitor”, and “Dead” lists.

ACTIVE
These bills are being actively lobbied by Williams Mullen, AIA Virginia, and ACEC Virginia. This does not necessarily mean we are testifying before committees on all of these bills. It could mean that we are engaged in conversations with bill patrons or other industries that can alter the legislation’s outcome.

HB 1811Helmer – Virginia Public Procurement Act; preference for energy-efficient and water-efficient goods.

HB 2001Helmer – State and local buildings, certain; building standards.

HB 2227Kory – Uniform Statewide Building Code; amendments, energy efficiency and conservation.

HB 5002Ward – Small Business & Women-owned & Minority-owned Business Procurement Enhancement Programs; establish.

SB 1209Petersen – Subcontractor’s employees; liability of general contractor for wages.

SB 1305McPike – Virginia Public Procurement Act; public works contracts, subcontractor workforce requirements.

SB 1384Surovell – Virginia Public Procurement Act; local arbitration agreements.

MONITOR
AIA Virginia is watching bills placed in this category.  Often, we are watching bills because they are of interest and we want to remain informed.  When this is the case, it is often another organization taking the lead due to its specific expertise and political relationships.  If amendments are introduced that make a bill in this category detrimental to our profession, then it is moved to the ACTIVE list and we engage.  There are some bills that AIA Virginia does not take a position on.  An example of this would be bills that define “small business”.  Because of the composition of our membership, we would not want to take action that would hurt any of our members.

HB 1800Torian – Budget Bill.

HB 1849Simonds – Virginia Public Procurement Act; participation in apprenticeship training programs, etc.

HB 1935Watts – Income tax, state; conformity with the Internal Revenue Code.

HB 2063Mullin – Virginia Overtime Wage Act; overtime compensation employees, penalties.

HB 2071Convirs-Fowler – Transportation funding; statewide prioritization process, resiliency.

HB 2137Guzman – Paid sick leave; employers to provide to certain employees.

HB 2177Torian – Capital outlay plan; repeals existing six-year capital outlay for projects to be funded.

HB 2178Torian – Commonwealth of Virginia Higher Educational Institutions Bond Act of 2021; created.

HB 2221Hayes – Environmental permits; community and environmental justice outreach.

HB 2288Williams Graves – Va. Public Procurement Act; construction contracts, requirement to submit list of subcontractors.

HB 2327Krizek – Prevailing wage rate; public contractors.

SB 1100Howell – Budget Bill.

SB 1109Stanley – Voter referendum; issuance of state general obligation bonds for school facility modernization.

SB 1155Howell – Capital outlay plan; repeals existing six-year capital outlay for projects to be funded.

SB 1209Petersen – Subcontractor’s employees; liability of general contractor for wages.

SB 1284Favola – Commonwealth Clean Energy Policy; established.

SB 1350Lewis – Transportation funding; statewide prioritization process, resiliency.

DEAD
The following depicts the bills of interest to AIA Virginia that were introduced but were not successful.  This list is expected to grow as the General Assembly advances. 

HB 1741Campbell, R.R. – Va. Public Procurement Act; contract clause requiring subcontractor reporting of certain payments.

HB 1755Carter – Right to work; repeals provisions of Code that refers to denial or abridgement.

HB 1784Ward – Small Business Procurement Enhancement Program; established, report.

HB 1787McNamara – Income tax, state; establishes an exclusion for Paycheck Protection Plan loan forgiveness.

HB 1794Davis – Collective bargaining; prohibited considerations during negotiations.

HB 1857Subramanyam – Virginia Public Procurement Act; architectural and professional engineering term contracting.

HB 1937Rasoul – Green New Deal Act; establishes a moratorium, effective January 1, 2022, etc.

HB 1974Rush – Architects & professional engineers; exemptions from license requirements for onsite sewage systems.

HB 2015Ayala – Essential workers; hazard pay, employer to provide personal protective equipment, civil penalty.

HB 2016Ayala – Paid family and medical leave program; Virginia Employment Commission required to establish.

HB 2093O’Quinn – School Construction Fund and Program; created and established.

HB 2103Reid – Certain public & private employers to provide earned paid sick time.

HB 2143Miyares – COVID-19 virus; immunity from civil claims related to the transmission of or exposure to the virus.

HB 2237McQuinn – Virginia Public Procurement Act; project labor agreements, transportation projects.

HB 2246LaRock – State agencies; automatic workforce management verification software.

HB 2259Scott – Governor; issuance of licenses to persons denied by regulatory board. [OPPOSED]

HB 2306VanValkenburg – Va. Public Procurement Act; contract clause requiring subcontractor reporting of certain payments.

HJ 552Levine – Recurrent inland and urban flooding across the Commonwealth; joint subcommittee to study.

SB 1186Hashmi – Landfill siting; historic preservation.

SB 1224Boysko – Uniform Statewide Building Code; amendments, energy efficiency and conservation.

SB 1330Boysko – Paid family and medical leave program; Virginia Employment Commission to establish.

SB 1352Lewis – Flood Control and Commonwealth Flood Control Board, Department of; established, report.

SB 1362Lewis – Employers; reporting outbreaks of COVID-19.

SB 1419Marsden – Project labor agreements; public interest.

SB 1449Chase – COVID-19 immunization; prohibition on requirement, employment discrimination prohibited.

SB 1450Chase – COVID-19 vaccination; discrimination in employment prohibited.

If you have any questions, please feel free to submit them to Corey Clayborne, FAIA at cclayborne@aiava.org