Call for Nominations: 2019 Honors Awards

Do you have a colleague who deserves recognition? Is there a firm that consistently produces incredible work? Is there a building that has captured your heart? Consider nominating them for AIA Virginia’s Honors Awards program.  

The Honors program recognizes the best efforts of Virginians who — by profession or avocation — have made creating, preserving, and enhancing Virginia’s communities an important life commitment. Honorees will be recognized at the Annual Meeting of the Membership at Architecture Exchange East (Nov. 7, 2019) and Visions for Architecture (Nov. 8, 2019).

Nominations

Nominations must be submitted online. Nominations should be submitted as a single PDF up to 20 pages (not including letters of support) and no larger than 30 MB. Letters of support can be combined into a single PDF and uploaded on the nomination form.

Nominations for all AIA Virginia honors may be made by individual members, by chapter honors committees, by AIA Virginia committees, or by the Board of Directors itself.

Current AIA Virginia Board members and Honors Committee members are not eligible for any award. No member of the Honors Committee may be used as a reference or adviser or be solicited by the candidate or the candidate’s advisor.

The deadline is Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 5 p.m.

Eligibility

Eligibility criteria and submission requirements vary by award. Click on the awards listed below for additional details and to review past recipients.

Award Categories

The William C. Noland Medal, as the highest award bestowed on a member architect, is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, that spans a broad spectrum of the profession and that transcends the scope of normal professional activities. Only one medal may be bestowed each year.

The Architecture Medal for Virginia Service is AIA Virginia’s most prestigious public award, honoring an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of the built environment. Only one medal may be bestowed each year but may be given simultaneously to more than one person.

The T. David Fitz-Gibbon Virginia Architecture Firm Award, as the highest honor bestowed by AIA Virginia to a Virginia-based architecture firm, recognizes a firm that has consistently produced distinguished architecture for at least ten years.

The Virginia Emerging Professional Award is intended to recognize the accomplishments of emerging leaders in Virginia for their contributions to the profession in one or more of the following categories: design, research, education, or discourse; service to the profession; mentorship; or service to the community.

The Award for Distinguished Achievement signals distinguished achievement by an architect in any one of the following categories: design, practice, education, service as “citizen architect”, and service to the profession; and thus may serve as an accolade for the work of an entire career or recognize the current accomplishments of a younger leader. Up to three awards may be bestowed each year.

Honorary Membership is bestowed upon a person of esteemed character who is not eligible for membership in the AIA Virginia but who has rendered distinguished and exemplary service, over a sustained period of time, to architecture and the built environment within the domain of AIA Virginia.

AIA Virginia Honors may be bestowed on non-member individuals or organizations that have inspired, influenced, or complemented the architecture profession in Virginia through practice of an allied profession, research, education, planning, legislation, architectural writing, the arts, or crafts. An individual who has previously been elected an Honorary Member of AIA Virginia is ineligible to receive AIA Virginia Honors.

The Test of Time Award recognizes architectural design of enduring significance. The structure should be in Virginia and must be no less than 25 years old. Building use may change over time if the overall design is cherished as a significant contribution to the community and the built environment.

CALL for NOMINATIONS: Honors Awards

Braden Field, AIA, Nathan Harper, AIA, and Maggie Schubert, AIA, were recognized with the Virginia Emerging Professional Award at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017

The AIA Virginia Honors Committee is asking you to take a look at the Honors categories, review the selection criteria, and then ask yourself a few questions:

1. Do you think you might be a candidate for one of these honors?
2. Do you have a colleague who deserves one?

If the answer to either of these questions is yes, we encourage you to submit your nomination for AIA Virginia’s Honors Awards.

 

AIA Virginia’s honors program recognizes the best efforts of Virginians who, by profession or avocation, have made creating, preserving, and enhancing Virginia’s communities an important life commitment.

Submit your nominations online. The deadline is 5 p.m., July 13, 2018.

Nominations must be submitted electronically. Nominations should be submitted as one PDF document up to 20 pages (not including letters of support) and no larger than 30 MB.

Eligibility criteria and submission requirements vary by award. Click on the awards listed below for additional details and to review past recipients.

Nominations for all AIA Virginia honors may be made by individual members, by chapter honors committees, by Society committees, or by the Board of Directors itself. Current AIA Virginia Board members and Honors Committee members are not eligible for any award. No member of the Honors Committee may be used as a reference or advisor or be solicited by the candidate or the candidate’s advisor.  See the 2018 Honors Committee members.

Award Categories

The William C. Noland Medal, as the highest award bestowed on a member architect, is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, that spans a broad spectrum of the profession and that transcends the scope of normal professional activities. Only one medal may be bestowed each year.

The Architecture Medal for Virginia Service is AIA Virginia’s most prestigious public award, honoring an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of the built environment. Only one medal may be bestowed each year but may be given simultaneously to more than one person.

The T. David Fitz-Gibbon Virginia Architecture Firm Award, as the highest honor bestowed by AIA Virginia to a Virginia-based architecture firm, recognizes a firm that has consistently produced distinguished architecture for at least ten years.

The Virginia Emerging Professional Award is intended to recognize the accomplishments of emerging leaders in Virginia for their contributions to the profession in one or more of the following categories: design, research, education, or discourse; service to the profession; mentorship; or service to the community.

The Award for Distinguished Achievement signals distinguished achievement by an architect in any one of the following categories: design, practice, education, service as “citizen architect”, and service to the profession; and thus may serve as an accolade for the work of an entire career or recognize the current accomplishments of a younger leader. Up to three awards may be bestowed each year.

Honorary Membership is bestowed upon a person of esteemed character who is not eligible for membership in the AIA Virginia but who has rendered distinguished and exemplary service, over a sustained period of time, to architecture and the built environment within the domain of AIA Virginia.

2016 AIA Virginia Honors

The honors program recognizes the best efforts of Virginians who, by profession or avocation, have made creating, preserving, and enhancing Virginia’s communities an important life commitment.

Submit your nominations online. The deadline is 5 p.m., July 15, 2016.

Nominations must be submitted electronically. Nominations should be submitted as one PDF document up to 20 pages (not including letters of support) and no larger than 30 MB.

Eligibility criteria and submission requirements vary by award. Click on the awards listed below for additional details and to review past recipients.

Nominations for all AIA Virginia honors may be made by individual members, by chapter honors committees, by Society committees, or by the Board of Directors itself. Current AIA Virginia Board members and Honors Committee members are not eligible for any award. No member of the Honors Committee may be used as a reference or advisor or be solicited by the candidate or the candidate’s advisor.  See the 2016 Honors Committee members.

Award Categories

The William C. Noland Medal, as the highest award bestowed on a member architect, is intended to honor a distinguished body of accomplishments, sustained over time, that spans a broad spectrum of the profession and that transcends the scope of normal professional activities. Only one medal may be bestowed each year.

The Architecture Medal for Virginia Service is AIA Virginia’s most prestigious public award, honoring an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of the built environment. Only one medal may be bestowed each year but may be given simultaneously to more than one person.

The T. David Fitz-Gibbon Virginia Architecture Firm Award, as the highest honor bestowed by AIA Virginia to a Virginia-based architecture firm, recognizes a firm that has consistently produced distinguished architecture for at least ten years.

NEW! The Virginia Emerging Professional Award is intended to recognize the accomplishments of emerging leaders in Virginia for their contributions to the profession in one or more of the following categories: design, research, education, or discourse; service to the profession; mentorship; or service to the community.

The Award for Distinguished Achievement signals distinguished achievement by an architect in any one of the following categories: design, practice, education, service as “citizen architect” , and service to the profession; and thus may serve as an accolade for the work of an entire career or recognize the current accomplishments of a younger leader. Up to three awards may be bestowed each year.

Honorary Membership is bestowed upon a person of esteemed character who is not eligible for membership in the AIA Virginia but who has rendered distinguished and exemplary service, over a sustained period of time, to architecture and the built environment within the domain of AIA Virginia.

AIA Virginia Honors may be bestowed on non-member individuals or organizations that have inspired, influenced, or complemented the architecture profession in Virginia through practice of an allied profession, research, education, planning, legislation, architectural writing, the arts, or crafts. An individual who has previously been elected an Honorary Member of AIA Virginia is ineligible to receive AIA Virginia Honors.

The Test of Time Award recognizes architectural design of enduring significance. The structure should be in Virginia and must be no less than 25 years old. Building use may change over time if the overall design is cherished as a significant contribution to the community and the built environment.

Call for Nominations: Honors Awards

2012 VSAIA President, Lori Garrett, AIA, presents the 2012 Noland Award to Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA
2012 VSAIA President, Lori Garrett, AIA, presents the 2012 Noland Award to Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA

Do you have an extraordinary colleague? Do you know an organization working to support architects or the built environment in Virginia? The VSAIA Honors program is accepting nominations for Virginians who exemplify the profession’s highest ideals and who are committed to enriching the built environment.

Nominations should be submitted electronically as one PDF document up to 20 pages (not including letters of support), and no larger than 50 MB.

If you have any questions, or if you are having trouble uploading your nomination, please contact rgeorge@aiava.org or (804) 644-3041, ext. 302. Nominations are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, July 19, 2013.To see the evaluative criteria, submission materials, and a list of past honorees, visit the Society Honors page and click the award name.

The submitter should be prepared to provide unrestricted high-resolution images to be used in connection with publicity of the program and the recognition of the honorees at Architecture Exchange East on Nov. 6–8, and at Visions for Architecture on Nov. 8.

Sponsorship opportunities are available for the Honors program. If you know of an organization that is interested in supporting Virginia architects, please share the benefits or encourage them contact Rhea George for more information.

Inform Awards Deadline March 22

The deadline to submit a project for the Inform Awards has been extended to  March 22, 2013. The program recognizes and encourages outstanding landscape architecture, interior design, and object design. The awards are open to anyone in Inform magazine’s primary circulation area—architects, interior designers, landscape architects, furniture designers, industrial designers, students, and faculty. Your business address must be located in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, the District of Columbia, or North Carolina. All work submitted must have been completed after January 1, 2008.

Award winners in both the Honor and Merit categories will be featured in a special section of Inform magazine and announced to the public.

Find out more or enter>>

Registration for 22nd Annual Inform Awards

Registration is open for the 2013 Inform Awards, which recognize design excellence beyond the more strictly defined realm of whole-building design. Specifically they highlight LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, INTERIOR DESIGN, and OBJECT DESIGN.

The Inform Awards are open to anyone in the Inform magazine primary circulation area (Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Maryland, and the District of Columbia). The program recognizes the work of  architects, interior designers, landscape architects, furniture designers, industrial designers, students, faculty, and clients.

Now is the time to position your award-winning talents (and those of colleagues whose work stands apart). Publication in Inform and in news releases to Mid-Atlantic publications will get that work before the eyes of your clients, potential clients, colleagues, and the public.

Entrants must have a business address in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, the District of Columbia, or North Carolina, and submitted work must have been completed after January 1, 2008. For members of the Virginia Society AIA, there is a special entry-fee discount.

Award winners in both the Honor and Merit categories will be featured in a special section of Inform magazine and announced to the public. The registration deadline is March 15, 2013, and you can enter online or via email, fax, or mail using the PDF registration form.

The Inform Awards fee structure for 2013 is $135 per project for members of the Virginia Society AIA, and $175 per project for entrants who are not members of the Virginia Society AIA. Note that the fees are due upon registration, non-refundable, and non-transferable.

As a clarification, the Object Design category covers furniture, appliances, fixtures, and building components and systems, as opposed to full-building design. For more details, click on one of the registration links above.

Inform Awards Jury Chair Announced

Inform magazine announced that Michael J. Crosbie, Ph.D., FAIA, will head the 2012 Inform Awards jury.

Crosbie is Chair of the Department of Architecture and an associate professor at the University of Hartford. He has been involved in architectural education for more than 20 years, and has lectured at architecture schools across the U.S. and abroad. He has been an editor for a number of national architectural magazines, and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Faith & Form, a journal on religious art and architecture. He is the author of more than a 20 books on architecture (including 5 books for children). He is also a frequent contributor to Architectural Record and writes about architecture and design for the Hartford Courant. A licensed architect, Crosbie previously practiced with Centerbrook Architects  and consults with Steven Winter Associates. He studied architecture at Catholic University.

The Inform Awards recognize outstanding work in landscape architecture, interior design, and object design. The program is open to anyone in the Inform magazine primary circulation area, including architects, interior designers, landscape architects, furniture designers, industrial designers, students, and faculty.

Entrants must have a business address in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, the District of Columbia, or North Carolina, and submitted work must have been completed after January 1, 2007.  More>>

Jefferson Award Goes to Virginia Fellow

Dan Feil, FAIAThis year’s Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture honors Virginia member Daniel Feil, FAIA, an experienced public-sector architect with a long history of enlisting the finest design talents to produce trendsetting public works. Feil and the other two 2012 Thomas Jefferson Award recipients are celebrated for demonstrating a commitment to quality design that recognizes public buildings and places as part of the nation’s cultural heritage.

The Thomas Jefferson Awards for Public Architecture recognize achievements in three categories: private-sector architects with a record of excellence in the design of public facilities, public-sector architects who promote design excellence within their agencies, and public officials or other individuals who have furthered public awareness of design excellence.  More >>

Call for Entries: Design Awards 2011

The Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects calls architects, interior designers, and preservationists to submit to the 2011 Awards for Excellence in Architecture presented by Scott Long Construction.

Three categories, three juries:

ARCHITECTURE, INTERIOR DESIGN, and PRESERVATION will each be judged separately by a jury of esteemed professionals.

Winners will be honored at a special session during Architecture Exchange East and at Visions for Architecture, a gala event hosted by the Virginia Society AIA. Winning projects will also be the subject of the fourth annual Design Awards exhibition at the Virginia Center for Architecture, and featured in Inform magazine’s annual directory.

The 2011 Design Awards are presented by Scott Long Construction and sponsored by Carolina Cast Stone Co., Inc.

Deadlines

4 p.m., June 30, 2011      REGISTRATION

4 p.m., July 21, 2011        PROJECT SUBMISSION

No faxes or mail to send! The Virginia Society AIA continues to pursue a more sustainable model of operating and therefore is accepting only electronic registrations.

Eligibility

All entries must be the work of licensed architects who have an office in Virginia OR are members of the Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects. This includes Associate Members of the VSAIA.

The location of projects is not restricted, but any built work submitted must have been completed after January 1, 2006.

Un-built work will also be considered, as long as it was commissioned by a client as opposed to hypothetical work completed in the mode of research or academic training.

Meet the Jury Chairs

ARCHITECTURE
Paul Mankins, FAIA
Recipient of the 2003 AIA Young Architects Award, and elected to the AIA College of Fellows at only 40 years old, Mankins is a founder and principal of the nationally recognized collaborative design practice Substance. In addition to awards from Architecture, Architectural Record/Business Week, Contract, I.D. (International Design), Interior Design and Residential Architect magazines, his work has been recognized with more than 35 Honor and Merit Awards at the regional, state and local level. In 2002 he received an AIA National Honor Award for Architecture. He serves on the National Board of Directors of the AIA, and during his time as Editor-in-Chief of Iowa Architect, it was recognized by the AIA as the outstanding component publication in the nation.

INTERIOR DESIGN
Kevin J. Flynn, FAIA, IES
Currently serving on the AIA National Board as a Regional Director from the Central States Region, Flynn has extensive experience in architecture, lighting design and theatrical design. Through his work as Executive Vice President of Kiku Obata & Company, he has been recognized for architecture, lighting, and retail design work by the AIA, Chain Store Age, the International Conference of Shopping Centers, Institute of Store Planners/Visual Merchandising & Store Design Magazine, and the International Illumination Design Awards.  In addition to his service to the AIA, he has served as president of the Illuminating Engineers Society of North America.

He is the 2012 Chair of the AIA Institute Honor Awards for Collaborative and Professional Achievement.

PRESERVATION
Eugene C. Hopkins, FAIA
Principal and co-founder of HopkinsBurns Design Studio, Hopkins is a nationally-recognized leader in historic preservation architecture. He has extensive experience in the restoration and rehabilitation of hundreds of structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places including a number of National Historic Landmarks. As president of the American Institute of Architects in 2004, he led efforts to renew the AIA/National Park Service/Library of Congress partnership; save the Farnsworth House; advance the integration of Historic Preservation principles into the architectural curriculum of colleges and universities and excluded the historic tax credit from the JOBS/Tax bill. He has received numerous recognitions for his contribution to architecture, including the 2003 prestigious Gold Medal from AIA Michigan, 2006 Gold Medal from AIA Detroit, the 2002 Robert Hastings FAIA Award and the 1992 AIA Michigan Young Architect of the Year Award. His work on the Michigan State Capitol received a National Trust for Historic Preservation Honor Award in 1992 and an AIA Honor Award for Architecture in 1996. In 2008 he was appointed Architect of the Michigan State Capitol.

See the Regulations and FAQs.

Virginia Society AIA Prize Announced

Students from Virginia’s architecture schools competed in January in the 2011 Virginia Society AIA Prize competition, sponsored by The Whiting-Turner Contracting Co.

Students were given one weekend to create a solution to a design problem: design a new Amtrak station in the town of Clifton Forge, Virginia. The current passenger train stop at this location is equipped with minimal facilities, consisting of a very small waiting room and bathroom, and is housed in a structure that is primarily a freight yard office building.

Program elements included a waiting room for approximately 25-30 people, a ticket counter with attached office, a small room for office and custodial storage, bathroom facilities, and onsite parking for 24 cars. There is a vacant one-story building on the site, which formerly housed a diner, but the competition assumed that it could be removed and/or replaced at the competitor’s discretion. Competitors could also alter or adjust the configuration of existing parking areas and driveways on the site.

The site is located along the main commercial street in downtown Clifton Forge, and competitors were encouraged to consider both pedestrian and vehicular connections to the street, such that the project could improve both the quality of passenger service as well as make a positive contribution to the town.

Each entry was required to be the work of one individual — no collaborative projects were allowed.

The jury was comprised of Timm Jamieson, FAIA (chair), Michel Ashe, FAIA, Joe Atkins, AIA, and Steven McCurdy of Norfolk Southern Railroad. They met March 30, 2011, to deliberate and select honorees.  Those honorees and the jury’s comments follow.

Congratulations to all those students who competed and a special thanks to our competition sponsor The Whiting-Turner Contracting Co.

2011 VSAIA Prize and Jury Comments

All the honorees had clear and complete communication of the elements and the plan.  Those honored had the strength of an idea, coupled with representation that lifted the idea up and made it clear.

Noteworthy original thought was characterized in a number of entries.

2011 VSAIA Prize Winner

Siim Tiisvelt, Virginia Tech Washington Alexandria Architecture Center
Said the jury:

Click to enlarge

This entry made an interesting pedestrian connection to the town, providing a view of the river and trains.  A simple, straightforward, and elegant solution.  One simple gesture provided a drop-off for people coming by car and a straightforward procession to the platform, with an extension of the street above for anyone to view trains and river beyond.  Civic minded seat steps reflected back to the main street.  This entry clearly understood the topography of the site well, as the whole sense of arrival seems more in scale than any other scheme.  This was the best implementation of the concept of giving people a place to watch trains.

 

Best in School Virginia Tech Blacksburg

Garrett Reynolds
Said the jury:

There was good recognition of the topography.  The site section at the bottom grabbed our attention.  The civic scale canopy was reflected in the mountains and to the town, almost as Saarinen did with Dulles Airport.  Tucking the parking under was nice solution to a tricky problem.  This is almost too much architecture for the town, but the resolution of the design was strong.  The double acting canopy is very nice, however, the sense of arrival is not very sophisticated.

Best in School Hampton University

Biyengo Lwandiko
Said the jury:

Nice neoclassical set of pieces.  In scale with the site; the entrance addresses the street and allows entry from the sidewalk into the building and progresses nicely as you get onto the train.  The town would love it.  Very nice presentation.  Complete…we fully understood all the parts. The jury wished the two building components had been better connected somehow.

Honorable Mention

Gui Talarico, Virginia Tech WAAC
Said the jury:

This is a wild and wonderful concept.  We laughed out loud at “Why the hell are we stopping a 750-ton, 800 foot long train for 180 pound people?” In all seriousness, we like that someone devoted thought to ecology and saving fuel.

Michael Smyles, Virginia Tech Blacksburg
Said the jury:

Very nice portal, with good imagery of the procession from platform to train.  A container that has an object — it’s a nice miniature version of larger train station a la Grand Central.  Special note: the jury members all mentally moved the newer building to be in harmony with the old building.

Recognition for Artistic Merit

Natalie Mutchler, Virginia Tech Blacksburg
Said the jury:

Very nice graphic representation.  We would have liked to see more addressing of the site plan. It is Hopper-esque, almost a frame-able poster.