Jury Announced for 2020 AIA Virginia Prize

AIA Virginia is pleased to announce the jury for the 2020 AIA Virginia Prize. The competition — which took place over the weekend of Jan. 24–27 — challenged students to design an oyster hatchery in Norfolk. Students were asked to imagine sustainable solutions where humans and nature could gracefully coexist. [Read the full competition brief.]

Each school’s faculty reviews the submissions and sends up to 10 finalists to Richmond for final consideration by the jury.

Jury

Bob Moje, FAIA, founding partner, VMDO Architects | Jury Chair
Patrick Farley, AIA, owner, Patrick Farley Architect
Lynden Garland, AIA, project manager, Baskervill
Donna Phaneuf, FAIA, president and lead design principal, VIA Design Architects
Chuck Swartz, FAIA, principal, Reader & Swartz Architects

The Prize is expected to be awarded in April.

About the AIA Virginia Prize

Conducted simultaneously at Hampton UniversityUniversity of VirginiaVirginia Tech, and the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center, the competition is a design charrette that engages students at all of the accredited schools of architecture in Virginia. Students are given the competition program on a Friday afternoon at 5 p.m. They work over the weekend to create a design solution and submit it by 9 a.m. the following Monday. The top submission wins a $2,2500 prize, with $250 prizes to each “Best of School” honoree.

Launched in 1980, the competition is intended to promote collaboration between the profession, students, and professors in Virginia. Historically, the charrette has taken place in January, however over the last several years, the competition has been hosted in September to accommodate an ongoing scheduling conflict at one of the schools. Now that the conflict has been resolved, the Prize weekend has shifted back to the spring semester to better align with the demands of the academic calendar.

Development of the competition brief rotates between the four schools annually — the 2020 Prize challenge was developed by Hampton University.

Student Competition Winner Announced

AIA Virginia is pleased to announce the students recognized as honorees in 2019 AIA Virginia Prize competition.

AIA Virginia Prize
The top award and $3000 prize goes to Jackson Reed a student at Virginia Tech for the submission “Frames of Reference.” The jury recognized the elegant way the structure could be both unveiled and packed away, noting that there was “a kind of magic to how it captured the light.” The submission displayed a technical superiority and a “completeness” to its presentation. The jury appreciated the fresh approach to a shipping container building, particularly in the way the volume could be reconfigured.

"Frames of Reference" by Jackson Reed, Virginia Tech was awarded the AIA Virginia Prize.
“Frames of Reference” by Jackson Reed, Virginia Tech was awarded the AIA Virginia Prize.

Special Jury Award and Hampton University Best of School
The Best of School Award for Hampton University goes to Julian Washington for “Veggie Soul.” The jury appreciated that the submission was rooted in its cultural context as well as its inventive placement inside an existing building. They found the rendering particularly evocative, giving a true sense of the concept and placement. The jury found this submission particularly notable and elected to make a Special Jury Award of $500.

Veggie Soul" by Julian Washington, Hampton University - The Best of School Award and Special Jury Award
“Veggie Soul” by Julian Washington, Hampton University – The Best of School Award and Special Jury Award

University of Virginia Best of School
The Best of School Award for University of Virginia goes to Taha Suhrawardy for “Sic Parvis Magna Café.” They jury enjoyed the design’s informality counterbalanced with its placement within a formal setting. Its lightweight characteristics and structural creativity were interesting. The approach to mobility was notable.

“Sic Parvis Magna Café” by Taha Suhrawardy, University of Virginia – Best of School Award

Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center Best of School
The Best of School Award for the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center goes to Meredith Sattler for “Deadrise Oyster Bar.”  This entry expressed what the environment has to offer in a really simple, pleasurable way. The jury found the response to the tidal condition interesting.

“Deadrise Oyster Bar” by Meredith Sattler, Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center – Best of School Award

The following were recognized with an Honorable Mention


“The New Taste of Flow” submitted by Mengzhe Ye and Weiran Jing from University of Virginia
The jury appreciated the graphic approach. They found the innovative and thoughtfully-considered user experience notable.

“The Hangout” submitted by Gary Garner from Hampton University
The jury found the idea of using readily-available swing equipment to create seating and a dining environment refreshing.

“King St. Pop Up Café” submitted by Juan Urey Fernandez from the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center
The jury was pleased with the clean, comprehensive design. The site placement was clear and precise — there was little missing.

“The Fulcrum” submitted by Andy Merida from Virginia Tech
The jury appreciated the elegant simplicity of this submission and its implied invitation to engage your imagination.

“Boba — A Pop Up Bubble Tea Shop” submitted by Kirt Hilker from Virginia Tech
The jury delighted in the submission’s imaginative approach that was truly representative of a “pop up” café.

“untitled” submitted by Anna Fletcher from Virginia Tech
The jury found this entry and its story gripping. The graphics beautifully captured the mood and emotional context of the narrative.



About the Challenge

The competition — which took place over the weekend of Jan. 25–28 — challenged students to design a pop-up diner with a small kitchen, short-term supply storage, and a dining counter for standing and sitting customers. Students were asked to consider the energy, water, and waste flows in their solutions. [Read the full competition brief.]


About the AIA Virginia Prize

Conducted simultaneously at Hampton UniversityUniversity of VirginiaVirginia Tech, and the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center, the competition is a design charrette that engages students at all of the accredited schools of architecture in Virginia. Students are given the competition program on a Friday afternoon at 5 p.m. They work over the weekend to create a design solution and submit it by 9 a.m. the following Monday. The top submission wins a $3000 prize.

Launched in 1980, the competition is intended to promote collaboration between the profession, students, and professors in Virginia. Historically, the charrette has taken place in January, however over the last several years, the competition has been hosted in September to accommodate an ongoing scheduling conflict at one of the schools. Now that the conflict has been resolved, the Prize weekend has shifted back to the spring semester to better align with the demands of the academic calendar.

Development of the competition brief rotates between the four schools annually — the 2019 Prize challenge was developed by Virginia Tech.


About the Jury

Each school’s faculty reviews the submissions and sends up to 10 finalists to Richmond for final consideration by the following Jury.

Nick Serfass, FAIA, Executive Director, RVATECH | Jury Chair

Burt Pinnock, FAIA, Chairman, Baskervill

Lori Garrett, FAIA, Senior Principal & Director of Higher Education Studio, Glavé & Holmes

Patrick Thompson, Assoc. AIA, Associate, Commonwealth Architects

Donna Phaneuf, FAIA, President + Lead Design Principal, Via Design

AIA Virginia Prize Weekend

The AIA Virginia Prize is a design charrette that engages students at all of the accredited schools of architecture in Virginia.  Conducted simultaneously at Hampton University, University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, and the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center, students are given the competition program Friday at 5 p.m. They work over the weekend to create a board presenting their design solution at 9 a.m. the following Monday. Each school’s faculty reviews the submissions and sends up to 10 finalists to Richmond for final judging. Learn more about the AIA Virginia Prize.

Student Design Competition Offers $3000 Prize

The AIA Virginia Prize design competition kicks off the new semester by offering students the opportunity to win a $3000 award. The competition is a design charrette that engages students at all of the accredited schools of architecture in Virginia.

Conducted simultaneously at Hampton University, University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, and the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center, students are given the competition program on a Friday afternoon at 5 p.m. They work over the weekend to create a design solution and submit it by 9 a.m. the following Monday.

Each school’s faculty reviews the submissions and sends up to 10 finalists to Richmond for final judging.

Development of the competition brief rotates between the four schools annually — the 2019 Prize challenge was developed by Virginia Tech.

Launched in 1980, the competition is intended to promote collaboration between the profession, students, and professors in Virginia. Historically, the charrette has taken place in January, however over the last several years, the competition has been hosted in September to accommodate an ongoing scheduling conflict at one of the schools. Now that the conflict has been resolved, the Prize weekend is shifting back to the spring semester to better align with the demands of the academic calendar.

Watch for announcement of the winner in the coming months. If you’d like to get involved, contact Rhea George at rgeorge@aiava.org.

Virginia Society AIA Prize Announced

The 2014 Virginia Society AIA Prize began at 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 12 and ran over the course of one weekend. Students from Hampton University; Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; Virginia Tech, Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC); and the University of Virginia were eligible for the competition.

The 2014 Prize program asked students to propose a new crossing over interstate I664 in Newport News, Virginia, mixing programs to produce a new public space for the city.

Faculty from the schools (Hampton University, Virginia Tech WAAC, Virginia Tech Blacksburg, and the University of Virginia) reviewed all of the entries and selected up to ten finalists from each school.

The jury was chaired by M. Kirk Train, FAIA, and included James P. Clark, FAIA; Rob Comet, AIA; and Elizabeth Seward.

 

THE HONOREES:

2014 Virginia Society AIA Prize

Milagros Josefina Sifon, WAAC

Said the jury: There is a consistent clarity of thought throughout. The submitter was brave enough to use the existing infrastructure and make it even better. It’s organic — turning road infrastructure into an organic form. Green spaces link the city like a connecting tissue and create a pedestrian space. The sketches give a real playfulness to the submission.

 

Best of School — Hampton University

Nick Shawyer

Said the jury: This was a strong attempt at urban infill. In some senses, this was the most literal interpretation. We appreciated the introduction of mixed-use.  

 

Best of School — University of Virginia

Yiming Li

Said the jury: The graphics were beautiful. This submission was taken to a higher level — it was very clear. The solution gives form to the roads and creates a new sense of the city.

 

Best of School — Virginia Tech

Alec Yuzhabenko

Said the jury: This solution was the most arresting singular image — it shows great restraint. It was iconic; very clam and restful. The idea of introducing water as a glue between two parts was powerful.

 

Honorable Mention

James Wood, WAAC
Said the jury: This was a strong idea. Interesting connectivity.

Bocong Chen, University of Virginia

Said the jury: Strong, simple concept. An arresting image.

 

The Virginia Society AIA Prize is sponsored by the Virginia Housing Development Authority.

Virginia Society AIA Prize Announced

Robert Lingo of Virginia Tech  submitted the winning entry.
Robert Lingo of Virginia Tech submitted the winning entry.

The annual Virginia Society AIA Prize competition was held over the weekend of Feb. 1-4, 2013.  This year’s competition has a new partner and Corporate Sponsor, the Virginia Housing Development Authority, who collaborated with faculty from Virginia Tech’s Washington Alexandria Architecture Center to develop the competition program brief.  Students in Virginia’s architecture schools were given the program Friday at 5 p.m.  The students worked over the weekend to create a board presenting their design solution by 9 a.m. Monday morning.

The 2013 Prize program asked the students to propose a design for a mixed-use fire station combined with dwelling units for the Beauregard neighborhood in Alexandria.

From the program:

“The building should consider the well-being of the community, enhancing a sense of place by designing this mixed use building for dwelling and fire protection. Mixed-use/mixed-income developments are important in the revitalization of older communities, complementing existing communities, traditionally designed in proximity of housing to goods, services, transportation and jobs. Giving new life to older communities such as Beauregard will come about by introducing new dwellings and protections (such as a fire station) to these communities. In this design competition you are asked to consider the powerful qualities of both fire and dwelling as you devise a design that reaches beyond pragmatic and efficient means. Your design should emphasize the power of home and fire while creating a potential for happiness, comfort, and security within this new community.”

Faculty from the schools (Hampton University, Virginia Tech WAAC, Virginia Tech Blacksburg, and the University of Virginia) reviewed all the submitted boards and selected ten finalists from each school to send to the Society.  The jury, chaired by Mary Patton Cox, FAIA, met in April to select this year’s winner as well as Best of School boards from each of the remaining schools.

The 2013 Virginia Society AIA Prize Winner is Robert Lingo of Virginia Tech

From the jury:

“We liked the way this entry takes the program from the abstract to the real, all in one board.  We liked the use of the foundry, combining a positive use of fire with a firefighting facility.  We also liked the varying scales, both macro and micro.  This entrant clearly thought beyond the scope of the problem, incorporating a community outreach component, into their solution.  The board is also a nicely designed composition.  Anyone can understand the presentation techniques.”

Best of School WAAC – Liz M. Fibleuil

From the jury:

“We liked the bold expression of fire, and the bold strokes of the presentation.  The entry takes an intangible and gives it three-dimensional expression in the forms and floor plan.  The use of color in the board is very vivid, as is the use of text in the descriptions of the design concepts.  The concept was conveyed well and well executed; we understood what they were trying to say.”

Best of School Hampton University – Alvin L. Mendoza

From the jury:

“This was a project that truly integrates the sense of community into the complex.  Not a traditional fire station per se, but that is partly what makes it remarkable.  It’s an iconic structure which is tied into the community and integrates the programmatic elements.  We liked the lyrical illustration of licks of flame, which is a creative interpretation.”

Honorable Mention – Kevin Gerrity, Virginia Tech

From the jury:

“We understand that this is not really a practical solution, but we liked the strong conceptual design, especially the components that can be plugged in as needed… very adaptable! The design of the board is lovely, very striking. The imagery is quite alluring, it draws you to it. Even the text box lines up with the residential floor plans. The section and floor plans describe it very well. A strong idea.”

The Virginia Society AIA Prize is sponsored by the Virginia Housing Development Authority.

Call for Entries: Prize for Design Research & Scholarship

Compelling architectural research happens in universities and firms across Virginia every day. The VSAIA Prize for Design Research & Scholarship was created in 2008 to encourage a healthy dialogue between researchers in the universities and the firms.

The Prize will be announced in July and recognition will be given by the Virginia Society AIA at Architecture Exchange East, the annual conference and expo, held Nov. 6-8, 2013, in Richmond.

DEADLINES

Entries: 5 p.m., Friday, May 3

Submissions: 5 p.m. Thursday, May 30

Eligible papers or articles include those that have been submitted but are pending acceptance, or those that have been published in a journal or conference proceedings within the past two years. Research projects or innovative project case-studies completed within the past three years and summarized in a paper or article are also eligible.

The 2013 Prize for Design Research and Scholarship is sponsored by MTFA Architecture.

Download the entry form or see more information>>

2012 WINNER
The 2012 jury unanimously selected “New Directions in Design Research: The Role of School Architecture in the Prevention of Childhood Obesity” as the 2012 Prize for Research and Scholarship. This paper was submitted by Robert Moje, FAIA, of VMDO Architects in Charlottesville.

VHDA Sponsors Virginia Society AIA Prize

The Virginia Housing Development Authority, a self-supporting, non-profit created by the Commonwealth of Virginia in 1972, helps Virginians attain quality, affordable housing. Their goals include increasing affordable housing opportunities for low- and moderate-income households; under-served minority populations; people with disabilities; and the frail elderly. They also work to ensure an ongoing inventory of affordable housing.

Recognizing that architects can provide the solutions they seek, the VHDA is sponsoring the 2013 student prize. The Virginia Society AIA Prize presented by Virginia Housing Development Authority is held annually near the start of the year. Students will spend the weekend of Feb. 1–3 designing a response to a problem created by faculty from one of Virginia’s architecture schools in collaboration with the VHDA.

Each school’s faculty reviews the submissions and sends up to 10 finalists to Richmond for final judging, which is expected to take place in early March.

Fellows Accepting Submissions for $100K Latrobe Prize

The AIA College of Fellows is now accepting first-stage submissions for the Latrobe Prize. The prize is awarded to a research proposal that has the long-range potential to resolve one or more 21st century architectural and built environment challenges. The prize provides the recipient with $100,000 to conduct research and develop a solution that enhances the current practice of architecture.

Full details are available in the Call for Proposals.

Registration Open for 21st Annual Inform Awards

As the markets begin to thaw, now is the time to position your award-winning talents before the eyes of your clients, potential clients, colleagues, and public through the 2012 Inform Awards, which recognize outstanding work in landscape architecture, interior design, and object design. The program is open to anyone in the Inform magazine primary circulation area, including architects, interior designers, landscape architects, furniture designers, industrial designers, students, and faculty.

Entrants must have a business address in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, the District of Columbia, or North Carolina, and submitted work must have been completed after January 1, 2007. And for members of the Virginia Society AIA, there is a special entry-fee discount.

Award winners in both the Honor and Merit categories will be featured in a special section of Inform magazine and announced to the public. The registration deadline is March 9, 2012, and you can enter online or via email, fax, or mail using the PDF registration form.

The Inform Awards fee structure for 2012 is $135 per project for members of the Virginia Society AIA, and $175 per project for entrants who are not members of the Virginia Society AIA. Note that the fees are due upon registration, non-refundable, and non-transferable.

As a clarification, the Object Design category covers furniture, appliances, fixtures, and building components and systems, as opposed to full-building design. For more details, click on one of the registration links above.