Tag Archive | "virginia center for architecture"

Charter Members

The following individuals and companies have shown their support of the Virginia Center for Architecture by becoming charter members.

If you, or your company, is interested in joining at this limited-time level, contact Hannah Levy, Manager of Philanthropic Partners, before December 13, 2015.

Individual Charter Memberships

Granite – $600
Samuel A. “Pete” Anderson III, FAIA
Augustine Angba
Paul H. Barkley, FAIA
Robert Edward Beach, AIA
Kathy Blanchard, VSAIA Allied Member and Jeffrey D. Blanchard AIA
Sanford Blanchard, FAIA and Page Bond
Peyton Boyd, FAIA
Robert Boynton, FAIA
Kim O. Boys
Sally Brown
William Brown, AIA
Kathy Calhoun
Laura Cameron
Ellen Cantor, Hon. VSAIA
Marvin J. Cantor, FAIA
Drew Carneal
Eloise Medinger Caudle
Steven “Kip” Caudle
Elizabeth F. Coffield
Tim Colley, AIA
Robert Combs
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Alexander Coor, VSAIA Allied Member
Mary P. Cox, FAIA
Albert Jack Davis, FAIA
Walter and Jennie Dotts
Helene Dreiling, FAIA
Page Edgerton
Virginia R. Edmunds
Christopher English
Jack M. Enoch, Jr.
Nita Enoch
Steven Michael Evans, FAIA
Richard L. Ford, FAIA and Sarah Ford
John Kendall Gallaugher
Rhea George
Walter Douglas Gilpin, Jr., FAIA
Patricia Glavé
G. William Greer
Dick Gresham
Elaine Overcash Hanbury
George Hellmuth
Thomas A. Kamstra, AIA
Bruce Kay
Ivor Massey, Jr.
Mark McConnel, AIA
Hugh C. Miller, FAIA
Ruth Blair Moyers
Edward Nace
Sharon Collins Park, FAIA
Patsy K. Pettus
Jacquelyn and Robert Pogue
Evelia M. Gonzalez Porto
Kathryn Prigmore, FAIA
Gerald J Ritter and Barbara E. Ritter
Coleen Butler Rodriguez and Agustin E. Rodriguez
Frederick Rogers
Robert M. Sexton
David Shields
Larry S. and Matilda S. Shifflett
Jack and Mary Spain
Tom and Tracy Stallings
Robert A. Steele, AIA
Dr. Lee Stelzer and Mrs. Katie Stelzer
Roger and Patricia Stroud
The Cynnie Davis and Don Swofford Fund
Reggie Tabor
Bill Talley, AIA
Hon. Helen Marie Taylor
George “Bill” William Thomas Jr.
William F. Vosbeck, FAIA
Joseph Wells, AIA and Windy Wells
Joseph Wisnewski, FAIA
Janet Woolwine
James M. Wright, AIA
Frances Zehmer
Bucci Zeugner

Marble – $400
Frederick H. Cox, Jr., FAIA
William E. Evans, AIA
Sandra Leibowitz, AIA
Roberta Ruhr

Quartz – $200
Dr. Charles Brownell, Professor Emeritus of Art History, Virginia Commonwealth University
Robert (Bob) Engle
Brenda Gayle Epperson
Valerie Hassett, FAIA
Patty Kruszewski
George Alan Morledge, AIA
Elizabeth A. Reader, FAIA
Nicholas Vlattas, AIA and Barbara Vlattas
Stephen Weisensale, AIA
Gail Zwirner

Corporate Level Charter Memberships

Granite – $6,000
Bruce Ford Brown Charitable Trust
Clark Nexsen Architecture and Engineering
Elmwood Fund
Gresham Family Trust
Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas
HGA Architects and Engineers
MTFA Architecture, PLLC
Mulvanny G2
Riverside Brick
Train & Partners
VMDO Architects, P.C.
Wiley|Wilson

Marble – $4,000
LITTLE
Saunders + Crouse Architects

Quartz – $2,000
BCWH Architecture
DBI Architects, Inc.
Glavé and Holmes Architecture

If you, or your company, is interested in joining at this one time level please contact Hannah Levy, Manager of Philanthropic Partners, before December 13, 2015.

Posted in Uncategorized

Light Therapy, Umea Sweden, photo by Ola Bergengren

Reprogramming the City Exhibition Opens

Reprogramming the City – Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure is a global overview of ways in which the existing structures, systems and surfaces of cities around the world are being redesigned, repurposed, and reimagined to do more for urban residents and expand the capabilities of the city itself.

Light Therapy, Umea Sweden, photo by Ola Bergengren

Light Therapy, Umea Sweden, photo by Ola Bergengren

The Virginia Center for Architecture invites you to attend the opening reception for  Reprogramming the City at the VCA on Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015 from 5–7 p.m.

During the reception you’ll have a chance to offer suggestions for improving Richmond’s infrastructure for urban living and see what are the most popular results on the “Word Cloud” screen in the exhibition space.

For more information, call (804) 644-3041, extension 100 or visit www.architectureva.org.  There is no charge to attend the Opening Reception; however spaces are limited. RSVP online to secure tickets. Reprogramming the City is at the Virginia Center for Architecture through March 22, 2015. There is no charge to visit the exhibition.

In addition to the exhibition, the Center will be offering a lecture, panel discussion and movie nights throughout the exhibition dates.

Posted in Professional Development News

Reprogramming the City Exhibition at VCA

Reprogramming the City is a global overview of ways in which the existing structures, systems and surfaces of cities around the world are being redesigned, repurposed, and reimagined to do more for urban residents and expand the capabilities of the city itself.

The Virginia Center for Architecture invites you to attend the opening reception for  Reprogramming the City at the VCA on Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015 from 5–7 p.m.

The Cascade in Hong Kong (photo credit: Scott Burnham)

The Cascade in Hong Kong (photo credit: Scott Burnham)

Reprogramming the City brings together dozens of examples of imaginative reuse and repurposing of urban infrastructure, from physical objects to the city’s most functional systems and surfaces. From a billboard in Lima, Peru, repurposed to create clean drinking water for residents, to a bus stop in northern Sweden fitted with light therapy bulbs to give those waiting for the bus a dose of the light they are missing during the dark winter months, Reprogramming the City is a collection of some of the best ideas for expanding the functionality of existing urban objects being explored across the globe.

Created by Urban Strategist Scott Burnham, Reprogramming the City reveals the city as a creative platform for new approaches to urban design. As Burnham says, “Reprogramming The City explores a new paradigm of urban creativity and resourcefulness that treats the hardware of the city as a platform of opportunity and the existing urban landscape not as the end result of a previous creative process, but the beginning of a new one.”

For more information, call (804) 644-3041, extension 100 or visit www.architectureva.org.  There is no charge to attend the Opening Reception; however spaces are limited. RSVP online to secure tickets. Reprogramming the City is at the Virginia Center for Architecture through March 22, 2015. There is no charge to visit the exhibition.

In addition to the exhibition, the Center will be offering a lecture, panel discussion and movie nights throughout the exhibition dates.

Posted in Membership News

VCA_ANN_LOGO_HORIZ_CMYK-1250

Ten Buildings that Changed Black History in Virginia

VCA_BANNER-595
Buildings shape our lives and reveal our history. The year 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects. In close collaboration with the Virginia Center for Architecture, the two organizations are embarking on a public outreach program called Virginia Celebrates Architecture.  One element of this program is to introduce new conversations about the built world and the part it played in shaping Virginia’s history.

In recognition of Black History Month in Virginia, the Virginia Society AIA and the Virginia Center for Architecture have assembled 10 structures that changed history in the Commonwealth.

1. Robert Russa Moton High School — A student-led strike at this Virginia school played a significant role in ending segregated “separate but equal” schools throughout the nation.

2. Fort Monroe — In 1861,the commander at this Hampton fortification announced that his troops would not enforce the Fugitive Slave Act. Slaves who fled to the fort would be treated as “contraband of war” and not be returned. By the time the Civil War ended in 1865, it is estimated that more than 10,000 enslaved African Americans sought refuge at Fort Monroe. 

3. Harrison School — Now the Harrison Museum of African American Culture, the Harrison School was the first public high school for African-American students in Southwest Virginia.

4. Gum Springs — West Ford, a former slave, founded Gum Springs after being freed by George Washington. The oldest African-American community in Fairfax County, Gum Springs became a sanctuary for freedmen and was an important stop on the Underground Railroad.

5. The St. Luke Penny Savings Bank — Conceived of by Maggie L. Walker, St. Luke’s provided a courteous, safe place for African Americans to conduct financial business during a time when Jim Crow laws and oppressive conditions made banking difficult for many blacks.

6. Kate Waller Barrett Branch Library — On August 21, 1939 — more than two decades before the famous sit-in movement — five young African Americans staged what is thought to be the first planned sit-in at the public library in Alexandria, Virginia.

7. Jackson Ward — After the American Civil War, previously free blacks joined freed slaves and their descendants and created this thriving African-American business community, which became known as both the “Black Wall Street of America,” and “The Harlem of the South.”

8. Attucks Theatre — Built in 1919, the Attucks Theatre was designed, developed, financed, and operated entirely by African Americans. Once known as the “Apollo of the South,” the theatre is named in honor of Crispus Attucks, the first American casualty of the Revolutionary War in the 1770 Boston Massacre.

9. Manassas Industrial School —The school was founded largely through the efforts of former slave Jennie Dean who, after years of fundraising, chartered the school on October 7, 1893. The school taught both academic subjects and skilled trades to young African Americans.

10. Longdale Recreation Area/Green Pastures Recreation Area — At the urging of the Clifton Forge Chapter of the NAACP, the Forest Service constructed this recreation area to be used by African Americans in the area. It was built by a local Civilian Conservation Corps company from 1938 to 1940 for the African American community in response to the construction of the whites-only Douthat State Park.

About the Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects
The Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects is a professional association representing nearly 2,500 members. Since 1914, the Virginia AIA has represented the professional interests of architects and allied professionals in the Commonwealth of Virginia. For more information, contact the Virginia Society at (804) 644-3041 or visit www.aiava.org.

About the Virginia Center for Architecture
The Virginia Center for Architecture is located at 2501 Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia’s historic Fan District. The Center is dedicated to developing the understanding of the power and importance of architecture through programs, exhibitions, and its stewardship of an historic landmark. The Center is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Learn more at www.architectureva.org.

About Virginia Celebrates Architecture
Virginia Celebrates Architecture is a year-long public outreach program marking the 100th anniversary of the American Institute of Architects in Virginia. It is intended to develop a broader understanding of architecture and design by beginning new conversations about buildings and the impact they have on our lives. Learn more at www.vacelebrates.org.

Posted in Membership News

A partnership between the Virginia Center for Architecture and the Menokin Foundation is yielding big dividends, including an exhibition and a visit from internationally recognized architect and educator Jorge Silvetti.

Jorge Silvetti to Speak in Richmond

Silvetti

Jorge Silvetti

A partnership between the Virginia Center for Architecture and the Menokin Foundation is yielding big dividends, including an exhibition and a visit from internationally recognized architect and educator Jorge Silvetti.

Menokin, the colonial home of Declaration of Independence signer Francis Gordon Lee, has fallen into ruins in recent years. In the spring of 2013, architecture professor Jorge Silvetti led 12 Harvard Graduate School of Design students through an exploration of the complex design and interpretive questions surrounding the c. 1769 Menokin site.  Beginning on Jan. 30, visitors to the Virginia Center for Architecture can discover the students’ innovative solutions for the evocative crumbling ruins and surrounding landscape at this 500 acre site in Virginia’s Northern Neck in an exhibition titled Ruins, Memory, and the Imagination: Menokin Revealed. Be among the first to explore the exhibition at the Opening Reception on Thursday, Jan. 30, from 4:30–6:30 p.m. The reception is free, but space is limited. Register online at architectureva.org, by email to info@aiava.org, or by phone to (804) 644-304, ext. 100.

On Feb. 7, the Center and the Menokin Foundation host Dinner with Jorge Silvetti: The Architect as Storyteller. Hear a lively lecture on Machado and Silvetti Associates’ revolutionary solution to rehabilitate the ruins at Menokin and create a teaching laboratory for design and humanities students at the site. Following the lecture, enjoy dinner with Silvetti in the Center’s galleries. Tickets are $125–200 and proceeds benefit the Virginia Center for Architecture and the Menokin Foundation. Purchase tickets online at architectureva.org.

About Jorge Silvetti 
Jorge Silvetti was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he received his diploma in architecture from the University of Buenos Aires. He continued studies at the University of California, Berkeley, receiving his Master of Architecture degree and pursuing post graduate work in the area of architectural theory and criticism. Mr. Silvetti’s architectural practice, Machado and Silvetti Associates, was formed with Rodolfo Machado in 1974. Machado and Silvetti Associates was incorporated in 1985. Silvetti has served as a juror for the Pritzker Architectural Prize since 1996, and in 2000 he became a juror for the Mies van der Rohe Prize for Latin American Architecture. Since 1975, he has taught architecture at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, where he is a tenured Professor of Architecture in Design and Design Theory.

Posted in Professional Development News

Elmwood-Gift

Virginia Center for Architecture Announces $250,000 Gift from The Elmwood Fund

Elmwood-Gift

Walter Dotts and Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA

The Virginia Center for Architecture announces today that it has received a pledge of $250,000 from the Richmond-based Elmwood Fund to support its mission and the preservation of its historic home.

The home of the Virginia Center for Architecture is the Branch House, a Tudor-Revival mansion situated at the heart of Richmond’s Monument Avenue.  The house was designed by the New York firm of architect John Russell Pope, FAIA and was completed in 1919; it is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was commissioned by and built as a private residence for financier John Kerr Branch and his wife, Beulah Branch. The Elmwood Fund is a private, non-profit family foundation operated by descendants of the Branch family.

“I feel strongly that the Branch House represents an iconic presence in the city in terms of our family’s history,” says Walter Dotts, administrator of the Elmwood Fund. “If they can be successful in attaining their goals,” he continues, “I believe the Virginia Center for Architecture would substantially benefit the city, state, and local cultural community.”

“We are thrilled to receive the Elmwood Fund’s support,” says Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA, the Center’s executive director.  “We believe this generous gift demonstrates the Branch family’s confidence in the mission and direction of the Virginia Center for Architecture, as well as our commitment to stewardship of their family home, an architectural treasure.  Their contribution will allow us to enhance our physical presence in the Fan District and Richmond community, while strengthening our programmatic presence throughout Virginia.”

The Virginia Center for Architecture is located in the Branch House at 2501 Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia’s historic Fan District. The VCA is dedicated to developing the understanding of architecture and design and their influence on our lives, our communities, and our world, which it promotes through programs, exhibitions, and education. The VCA is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Learn more at www.architectureva.org.

Posted in Membership News

"MUTATIONS: The DNA of Twentieth Century Design" features the work of 28 iconic designers and demonstrates the physical and metaphysical intersections that bind design.

Mutations on View at the Virginia Center for Architecture

Saul Bass's Vertigo poster

By combining photography, typography and hand-made graphics into expressive pictographs, Saul Bass brought additional power to the work of directors like Alfred Hitchcock and Otto Preminger.

Design, like DNA, describes who we are and how we evolved. Technological evolution presents designers with means and methods to express ideas that continually build upon a collective heredity. Evolution, however, is not contingent solely on nature. Often misstated as “survival of the fittest,” evolution depends on the genetic mutations that best provide an individual or system the ability to adapt to and thrive in its environment. Accordingly, great design evolves not out of the desire to generically appeal for universal acceptance, but from an astute reading of and capitalization on the passions, needs and aspirations of an era. As opposed to timelessness, design speaks to a moment. If design lingers in our collective awareness, it is precisely because it captures the spirit of the best ideas, practices and expressions of its time. This cultural, philosophical, geographic and intellectual nurturing of design is as important, therefore, as its elemental composition.

Louis Kahn's Salk Institute

Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute spans the dogma of early modernism and the ambiguity of late-twentieth century design. Photo by Llewellyn Hensley.

The Virginia Center for Architecture announces a new exhibition chronicling the intersections between fashion, graphic design, interior design and architecture throughout the last century. MUTATIONS: The DNA of Twentieth Century Design features the work of 28 iconic designers and demonstrates the physical and metaphysical intersections that bind design. The exhibition opens with a Reception on July 25 from 5:30–7:30 p.m. and features light refreshments. There is no charge to attend, but space is limited and reservations are recommended. Call (804) 644-3041, ext. 100, register online at www.architectureva.org or email info@aiava.org to make reservations.  The exhibition will be on view through Oct. 13, 2013.

The exhibition was curated by Roberto L. Ventura with students from Virginia Commonwealth University’s Departments of Graphic, Fashion and Interior Design. Most of the students came to the project through their participation in the Middle of Broad interdisciplinary studio and each played large roles in the generation of the design brand, exhibit design, and content. The design team included Liz Belte, Sarah Brown, Ying Jun Cheng, Laura Colagrande, Llewellyn Hensley and Mia Zhou.

About the Guest Curator

Roberto L. Ventura has practiced and taught modern and sustainable design in Virginia and North Carolina for 15 years. A member of a number of local teams earning design awards from AIA Richmond and the James River Green Building Council, his work has also been exhibited nationally through the HOME house Project sponsored by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art. For the international light art exhibit InLight Richmond 2009, he collaborated with poet Joshua Poteat on the installation “for gabriel,” winning Best in Show.

While maintaining his practice, roberto ventura design studio, Ventura is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Interior Design in the School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University. He has also taught Interior Architecture at the University of North Carolina – Greensboro, and has lectured at the University of Oulu, in Oulu, Finland. Ventura holds a Master’s in Architecture from Miami University and a B.A. in Math and Physics from Albion College. He earned his LEED AP accreditation in 2008 and his NCIDQ certification in 2012.

About the Virginia Center for Architecture
The Virginia Center for Architecture is located at 2501 Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia’s historic Fan District. The Center is dedicated to developing the understanding of the power and importance of architecture and design through programs, exhibitions, and its stewardship of an historic landmark. The Center is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Learn more at www.architectureva.org

Posted in Membership News

VCA Launches New Website

screenshotIn celebration of Architecture Week and the 8th anniversary of its public opening, the Virginia Center for Architecture announced today a redesign of its website. In addition to a more user-friendly interface, the new site features responsive design, providing a better browsing experience on mobile devices.

The site also has new address — architectureva.org. It will still be accessible though the www.virginiaarchitecture.org portal, however now users will also be able to access the site directly.

Posted in Uncategorized

The Virginia Center for Architecture announced its inaugural Art by Architects exhibition, opening on Thursday, April 11, 2013.

Art by Architects Opens at the Virginia Center for Architecture

Art by Architects posterThe Virginia Center for Architecture announced its inaugural Art by Architects exhibition, opening on Thursday, April 11, 2013, in conjunction with the celebration of Virginia Architecture Week. Residents of Virginia who have a degree in architecture or who are practicing architects were encouraged to submit their artwork. From among the 175 submissions, 44 artists had at least one handmade piece of visual art chosen for the exhibition, which includes paintings (oil, watercolor, acrylic), drawings (pencil, ink), and collages (mixed media).

Art by Architects was developed to spotlight what many architects do for recreation. Architects paint, draw, sketch, doodle, and create art on paper, canvas, and even napkins. They design wherever they are — inspired by nature, their surroundings, and their travels. “Architects create art as an avocation or to inspire their architectural work,” says guest curator Michael Bednar, FAIA.

The exhibition was juried by Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA, Dean of the College of Design at North Carolina State University. “The inspiration to act as a judge for a show of creative work,” says Malecha, “is a quest for the greater cognitive skills that come from a life of intense observation. It comes from the success and failures of a creative life, of a design life.”

The exhibition, which runs through July 7, kicks off with an Opening Reception on Thursday, April 11, 2013, from 5:30–7:30 p.m. The Opening Reception is free, but space is limited and reservations are requested. Make reservation online, call (804) 644-3041, ext. 100 or email info@aiava.org.

The following artists and works are featured in the show.

Carl Schwarz, AIA
Rotunda Window, 2005, Watercolor (Not for Sale)
Doorway, 2005, Watercolor (Not for Sale)

Patrick W. McClane
Bermuda Shutter, 2012, Watercolor (Not for Sale)

David Ghezzi
Ephemeral Impressions, 2012, Acrylic paste and paints over canvas ($497)

Robert E. Washington, FAIA
Still Life With Blue and Grey Glassware, 2012, Acrylic on canvas ($1100)

William Brown, AIA
Doge’s Palace St Mark’s Square, 1990, Watercolor (Not for Sale — On loan from the collection of Fleur Duggan)

Richard E. Bednar
Fresh Ground, 2012, Oil (Not for Sale)
Got Milks, 2012, Oil (Not for Sale)

Thea Scott-Fundling
Marsh, 2003, Watercolor (Not for Sale)

Margy Bozicevich
Tidal Overflow, 2011, Graphite, watercolor, colored pencil, and xylol (Not for Sale)

Thomas Kerns, FAIA
Hells Canyon, 2008, Plein air watercolors (Not for Sale)
Claytor Lake, 2011, Plein air watercolors (Not for Sale)
Catedral de Santo Domingo, 2010, Plein air watercolors (Not for Sale)
St Ivo, 2012, Plein air watercolors (Not for Sale)
St. Peter’s Colonnade, 2012, Plein air watercolors (Not for Sale)

Cory Dear
Macro Micro, 2006, Oil and acrylic ($750)

Warren Boeschenstein
Caribbean Wall Detail 2, 2013, Acrylic on canvas (Not for Sale)

David A. Prevette, AIA
Villa Maderni, 2002, Pen and ink (Not for Sale)

Lyndl Thorsen Joseph
Paul on The Road to Damascus or Caravaggio Reconfiguration, 1992, Oil on linen (Not for Sale)

Bhagyashri Guhagarkar
Trees Bright Green, 2012, Acrylic on dry erase poster board with a metal scraper (Not for sale)

Donald R. Sunshine, FAIA
Marco Walk 2
, 2012, Watercolor ($275)

James C. Hill
Kensington Avenue, 2012, Screenprint ($120)

David Marion
Father of a Righteous Child, 2011, Oil on Canvas ($2200)

Andrew J. McKinley, AIA
Colosseum, 2005, White charcoal and black ink on toned paper (Not for Sale)

Stephanie Burcham
Skeleton Figure, 2011, Charcoal and chalk ($400)

Ashley LeFew
Glass Gate, 2012, Watercolor (Not for Sale)

David Dugas
Henge, 2012, Graphite on paper (Not for Sale)
Observatory II, 2012, Graphite on paper (Not for Sale)

Helene Renard
Shifting Landscape 2, 2007, Mixed media collage: monotype print, thread ($1200)

Bob Anderson, AIA
Yana III, 2012, Rapidograph pen ($3,950)

Rebecca J. Cook
Florence Views, 2009, Pen and ink (Not for Sale)
Palazzo Tursi, 2009, Watercolor and ink (Not for Sale)
Il Colosseo, 2009, Pen and ink (Not for Sale)

Shannon Dowling
Carve, 2011, Ink and pastels on watercolor (Not for Sale)

Karen Van Lengen, FAIA
San Francesco d’Assisi, 1990, Oil pastel and prismacolor (Not for Sale)

Todd W. Bullard, AIA
Crow, 1973, Pen and ink (Not for Sale)

James J. DePasquale AIA
Lago di Como, 2012, Pen and ink (Not for Sale)

Dennis J. Kilper
17, 2003, Acrylic paint on stretched, acid-free paper (Not for Sale)

Mark C. Campbell AIA
Day at the Beach, 2013, ,Oil on board ($500)
Reflections on the James, 2011, Oil on canvas ($2900)
Carillon Morning, 2012, Oil on canvas ($2900)

John S. LaMonica, AIA
Sicilian Street, 1976, Watercolor (Not for Sale)

Terri Crockett, Assoc. AIA
Notre Dame du Haut, 2011, Watercolor ($350)

Jay Moore, AIA
Point of Origin, 2012, Acrylic on panel ($525)

Christine Haven Canabou
Eroded Corinthian, 2007, Charcoal and conté on paper (Not for Sale)
Tenement Street, 2007, Conté on paper (Not for Sale)

Donald F Kaupp, Jr.
Horse 2, 1999, Watercolor (Not For Sale)

Wesley Page, AIA
Black Dog/Green Couch, 2011, Oil on canvas (Not for Sale)

Scott Gartner
Do Not Discard, 2009, Collage ($750)
Telemetry, 2009, Collage ($1250)

Peyton Boyd, FAIA
Back, 1990, Watercolor (Not for Sale)

Carlton S. Abbott, FAIA
Post Cards from Trier, Germany on The Moselle River, 2012, Ink, watercolor, chocolate and wine (Not for Sale)

Kevin Svensen
Garden Temple, 2012, Graphite & India ink wash on watercolor paper (Not for Sale)
Palazzo Strozzi Bay Study, 2009, Graphite and watercolor wash on watercolor paper (Not for Sale)
Palazzo Cancelleria Bay Study, 2009, Graphite and watercolor wash on watercolor paper (Not for Sale)
Palazzo Farnese Bay Study, 2009, Graphite and watercolor wash on watercolor paper (Not for Sale)

David Stemann
Erforschen 8-3, 2012, Acrylic wash (Not for Sale)

Todd S. Phillips, Ph.D., AIA
Family, 2011, Oil on canvas (Not for Sale)

Mary Cox, FAIA
Motif #1 Rockport Maine, 2012, Watercolor ($350)

Sanda Iliescu
RECOVERED (4a), 2012, Watercolor and gouache on paper ($1400)

Posted in Membership News

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Foundation Honored with Architecture Medal

The Dominion Foundation has been selected to receive the Architecture Medal for Virginia Service. The Society’s most prestigious public award, the Medal honors an individual or organization that has made an unusually significant contribution to Virginia’s built environment or to the public’s understanding and awareness of our built world. The Society presents this award jointly with the Virginia Center for Architecture at the Visions for Architecture gala on Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, at the Hotel John Marshall.

The Medal celebrates, particularly, the Foundation’s philanthropic support for organizations working to advance the ideals of livable communities and environmental conservation across the Commonwealth. Contributing more than $20 million annually to non-profit organizations and schools, the Foundation supports a wide range of human service, environmental, educational, and cultural organizations. Their support for the Learning Barge on the Elizabeth River has educated thousands of Virginia residents about the importance of environmental stewardship. Similarly, their support for programs like Energy Share, area Agencies on Aging, the United Way, the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, Project Plant It!, the Nature Conservancy, the Artificial Reef Program — and many more — has helped to build stronger communities throughout mid-Atlantic.

In addition, the award recognizes the Foundation’s generous gift to the Virginia Center for Architecture which was instrumental in securing the Center’s continued ability to pursue its educational mission. Their substantial gift, contributed over the past 5 years, has been utilized by the Center to advance the understanding of architecture through a variety of educational programs and exhibitions. It also made possible much-needed historic preservation of the Center’s historic home at 2501 Monument Avenue.

Posted in Membership News

 

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