Young Architect’s Forum Update

Happy June everyone, there are a few updates and deadlines from the Young Architect’s Forum (YAF). It is all exciting and asking for engagement, so please read on!

  • Applications for Summit 30 – Due 6/19
  • Submissions for the next issue of the publication “Connection” – Due 7/29

Summit 30

Every 5 years the YAF undertakes its strategic planning for the next 5 years at our Summit. This year is the 30th anniversary of the YAF, hence the name “Summit 30.” The Code Red Charrettes discussed in my previous post gave us the thoughts, opinions, and sentiments from a wide range of architects that armed us with information for Summit, themed “Mission: 2130”–discussing critical issues facing the next 100 years. If you participated in the Charrettes thank you for your valuable input! Apply by June 19th at THIS LINK to be one of the select 50 people in the room to help shape the future of the YAF and its strategic goals for the next 5 years.

Connection Publication

Did you know that the YAF publishes a quarterly online magazine called Connection? Last year, we published an article titled “Becoming Visible”, amplifying the voices of young architects and emerging professionals advocating for justice, equity, diversity and inclusion in architecture. In order to further these efforts, we would like to continue celebrating and featuring young architects and emerging professionals who have done great work in the world of architecture, particularly in advocating for diversity and inclusion in our field, through social media and a second Becoming Visible article in the Fall/Winter issue. We are looking for “emerging professionals” (less than 10 years since college graduation) and “young architects” (less than 10 years licensed) to showcase and inspire others. If you know someone who fits the bill, please contact me with their name and email address and I can contact them directly about the logistics. Please also feel free to forward this message to your other networks!

Anyone can contribute to Connection, and it is an easy way to be recognized and published. The next theme is “Career Evolution” and the content is due July 29th. Reach out if you have ideas or want to contribute to Carrie Parker at carrieleeparker.aia@gmail.com

As always, stay connected to the YAF in our channels:

  • AIA Knowledge Net (most comprehensive) 
  • Quarterly YAF Publication “Connection”. Links from Knowledge Net, are also available HERE.
  • Twitter: @YAF
  • Facebook: @AIAYAFNational
  • Instagram: aiayaf
  • Linkedin: AIA YAF

The Forum

Hello AIA Virginia members, I am excited to begin my two-year term as your representative on the Young Architect’s Forum (YAF). 

WHO AM I?

I am a Senior Associate at CannonDesign in Arlington, Virginia where for the last 9 years I have been specializing in higher education projects, mostly student life and science and technology. I graduated from Oklahoma State University and have had my architectural license since 2016. I officially onboarded to the YAF at the annual meeting last week and will be on the Strategic Vision Focus Group for the next year. But enough about me, many of you may wonder what the YAF is and what the role entails. 

Carrie Parker, AIA

WHO IS THE YAF?

The YAF is a program of the American Institute of Architects and the College of Fellows (COF) and is organized to address issues of particular importance to recently licensed architects, within 10 years of licensure. 

The national YAF Advisory Committee (AdCom) is charged with encouraging the development of national and regional programs of interest to young architects and supporting the creation of YAF groups within local chapters. Approximately 23,000 AIA members are represented by the YAF; our volunteer leaders are Young Architect members in the AIA national, regional, state, and local components. YAF programs, activities, and resources serve young architects by providing information and leadership; promoting excellence through fellowship with other professionals; and encouraging mentoring to enhance individual, community, and professional development.

The Young Architects Forum Leadership consists of:

  • AdCom (Chair, Vice-Chair, Advocacy Director, Knowledge Director, Communications Director, Community Director, Strategic Vision Director);
  • Regional / state representatives;
  • AIA Board of Directors Liaison;
  • AIA Strategic Council Liaison; 
  • AIA College of Fellows Executive Committee Liaison;
  • YAF Past Chair

The YAF itself is in its first year of a renaissance. Previously the YAF body was composed of only 18 individuals appointed by regions of states. This is the first transition year where instead of regions, we are representing individual states and territories. This will soon give us a body of more than 50 individuals, increasing the size of each focus group and allowing us to accomplish more in the process.

The AIA has re-organized this year and the YAF is now under the body of the Workforce and Knowledge Community Group, while the sister organization of the National Associates Committee (NAC, Virginia represented by Caitlin Morgan) remains under the AIA’s Center for Emerging Professionals. Why this change? There has been a lot of conversation about the definition of “Emerging Professionals” and the Emerging Professionals Task Force deemed that those who are licensed are no longer “emerging” in their careers. An Emerging Professional is officially defined as “professionals who have completed their academic studies up to the point of licensure or up to 10 years after completion of their academic studies.” So in order to better serve you and create content that you will use, there is now more specificity to cater to each population. 

WHAT’S NEXT?

We are gearing up for YAF’s 30th anniversary at Summit 30 this fall where we will set the strategic initiative and vision for the next 5 years. We are hosting a series of 90-minute virtual charrettes called “Mission 2013: Code Red” April 5-7 (times vary) to allow us the opportunity to gather data that will inform the Summit. Help us answer questions like “What will the world look like in 100 years? How will the profession of architecture evolve to meet the demands of our future communities and climate? What technology needs to be invented to support these efforts?” Join the YAF for a robust conversation about the future of our planet as we crowdsource risks and opportunities related to the built environment’s connection to planetary and human health. Register to participate HERE.

The Future Forward Grant is open for applications. Presented by the AIA Large Firm Roundtable (LFRT) and the YAF, this grant supports emerging professionals and young architects in the testing of new ideas that disrupt the traditional conception of practice, process, and product in the field of architecture. The application period is now open and closes on April 30, 2022, at 11:59 pm EST. Find the grant and apply HERE.

FOLLOW US

Stay up to date on the latest news:

  • Twitter: @YAF
  • Facebook: @AIAYAFNational
  • Instagram: aiayaf
  • Linkedin: AIA YAF
  • AIA Knowledge Net (most comprehensive) 
  • Quarterly YAF Publication “Connection”. Links from Knowledge Net, also available HERE.

YAF Summer Design Challenge 2020

YAF SDC CANCELLED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

Due to the present challenges of our nation’s enduring situation and uncertainty, the YAF Summer Design Challenge 2020 is cancelled until further notice. We do apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. If you have any questions or concerns, please reach out to us at yafsdc@gmail.com.

We are hopeful that things will get better soon and we can rock on with you in the not-so-distant future.

Be well and safe.

Announcing [yaf]CON

AIA Virginia is proud to announce a partnership with the Young Architect’s Forum in Hampton Roads to present [yaf]CON.

[yaf]CON is a newly-curated micro conference for emerging design professionals held 2-5 p.m. on Nov. 9, 2018 during Architecture Exchange East.

[yaf]CON is open to the young and to the young- hearted. The goal is to have fun, to learn, and to discuss the power of design for our communities. This inaugural program was developed to create a platform for emerging professionals for years to come.

You can add [yaf]CON to your ArchEx agenda for no extra charge — or join us for [yaf]CON for only $50.

[yaf]CON is intentionally open to allied professions to encourage cross-pollination of ideas, skill sets, and networks to better activate and enrich our cities through the energy and passion of emerging professionals in the design and construction fields.

[yaf]CON is curated and hosted by the AIA Hampton Roads Chapter of the Young Architects Forum.

ELA Program Gains National Attention

Josephine V. Arbaugh, AIA, the AIA Young Architects Regional Director for The Region of the Virginias, and an ELA class of 2012 alum, has written a wonderful article in the recent issue of AIA Young Architect Forum’s publication Connection.

Read the article>> (on page 34)

Connection is published bi-monthly by the AIA, and is one of the only architecture periodicals that has content exclusively sourced from Emerging Professionals, serving as a platform for architecture students, associates, and young architects to communicate at a national scale.

YAF Advisory Committee Seeks Members

Are you ready to make the jump to a national level committee? Can you think strategically about the needs of young architects and work virtually with other committee members across the country? Consider applying for the YAF Advisory Committee. Open positions include:

  • Vice Chair
  • Community Director
  • Public Relations Director

Applicants must be young architects registered for 10 years or less.

The YAF Advisory Committee (YAF AdCom) is made up of young architects working in association with the COF Executive Committee. The structure of the Young Architects Forum was originally modeled after the leadership structure of the College of Fellows (COF) and is itself a prime example of mentoring in action. For more information on the YAF and Advisory Committee positions, view the YAF Handbook.

The AdCom typically meets in-person three times a year and has monthly conference calls. Interested candidates must be available for a transition meeting with current and incoming YAF Advisory Committee members Sept. 19-21, 2013.

Application deadline is Aug. 26, 2013.

Applicants must submit a one-page “Letter of Interest” describing their interest in a specific position. Additionally, applicants must provide a resume and three (3) letters of recommendation, including one from an AIA component leader (i.e. a Chapter President, Regional Director, or Component Executive). Application materials must be 8 ½” x 11” files and must not exceed six (6) pages and 5MB total.

Please submit applications as a single PDF document titled as follows: “YAF_AdCom_Application_LastName_FirstName.pdf”

Submissions may be addressed to Jon Penndorf and emailed to yaf@aia.org.

Eligibility: Applicants must be members of the AIA in good standing, and architects licensed ten years or less, for at least the first year of their term. Appointments are based on submitted materials, and selection will be made by the YAF AdCom selection committee in late August. Although the Young Architect Regional Director (YARD) roster often serves as a pool of nominees for the AdCom positions, YARD experience is not required.

Call for Applications: Emerging Leaders in Architecture Class of 2014

Emerging Leaders class of 2012.
Emerging Leaders in Architecture class of 2012.

The Virginia Society AIA is accepting nominations for the 2014 class of the Emerging Leaders in Architecture through Nov. 15, 2013. The intensive, year-long program is intended to provide the tools and experiences that emerging architects need to jumpstart their careers.

“I have been enlightened to the full potential of an architect in business and as part of a community.”
-Program Participant

Accelerate your professional growth, advance your career, and serve society as a leader in the community.

  • Examine the evolving roles of architects and firms
  • Gain the resources to make informed business decisions about financial and practice management matters
  • Consider the fundamental legal, ethical and societal responsibilities of architects
  • Develop a peer network to serve as an ongoing resource

Learn from established leaders in the building, finance, non-profit, development, university, legal, consulting, and design professions. Each of the seven day-long sessions focuses on essential strategies or skills such as financial management, presentation and communication skills, negotiating techniques, understanding legal and ethical issues, and public service.  Put the concepts you learn into practice and enhance your leadership skills with a class project solving a real-world problem.

Find out more>>

How to Apply

The committee seeks applicants from three categories:

Component Nominees Each of the five Virginia AIA local component Boards may nominate one or more individuals for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each chapter for a total of five.

Student Nominees Each Virginia Architecture School (UVa, VT, Hampton, and WAAC) may nominate one or more students for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each school for a total of four.

Open Applications Applicants may apply on their own or be nominated by someone else.  Seven participants will be selected from among these applicants.

Download the application for details.

AIA Directors Announce Fellowship for Future Leaders

Two AIA Members
© 2006, The American Institute of Architects. All rights reserved.

The AIA Board of Directors Class of 2013 chose as its name The Original 13 based on Richard Upjohn and the 13 Architects who founded the AIA in 1857. They took their class name from the tradition of the past but are looking to the future.

They want to meet Emerging Leaders at the AIA Convention this June in Denver, and are offering five fellowships in the amount of $1,000 each to attend the Convention, expand career horizons and look to the future.

HOW IT WORKS

Send a Tweet of Interest to share what you hope to learn by attending the Convention as an Emerging Leader. The Class will review your Tweets and select ten finalists. These finalists will write a more detailed narrative of their aspirations. Five Fellowship Recipients will be selected from this group on the basis of their narratives.

Each Fellowship Recipient will be paired with two Class of 2013 Board Directors during the Convention and will receive a $1,000 stipend to offset expenses. They’ll help each Fellowship Recipient realize his/her aspirations at Convention; get to know them personally with the hope of forming enduring relationships. After Convention they’ll ask for a report on the experience to share with other Emerging Leaders.

AIA CONVENTION IN DENVER

June 20-22, 2013

Denver, Colorado

FELLOWSHIP FOR EMERGING LEADERS

Students

Associates

Young Architects

TWEET OF INTEREST

Tweet us at #2013FEL

Tweet period is open until MARCH 30TH

Finalists will be notified via phone by APRIL 12TH

Recipients will be selected by APRIL 29TH

Profiles in Emerging Leaders: Class of 2012

Designed to develop future leaders in architecture firms, in communities, and in the profession, the Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) program consists of seven intensive day-long seminars. Each session focuses on one or more essential strategies or skills like financial management, presentation and communication skills, negotiating techniques, understanding legal and ethical issues, and public service.  We were curious about them, so we asked members of the ELA class of 2012 the same five questions, and this is what they had to say.

Want to be a member of this elite group of leaders? Apply to be a member of the class of 2013.

Allie Ditzel
Allie Ditzel

Allie Ditzel

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Tado Ando’s Modern Art Museum in Fort Worth.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: “Healing Spaces: The Science of Place and Well-Being” by Ester Sternberg

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I think I found it through my other passions…people watching and changing the world.  One day, people watching became about more than just the people, it started to include how spaces and places impact our choices, human relationships, and emotions; and I realized that design really could change things.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Run…a lot. It may not necessarily be relaxing but it’s a great way to clear your head.  It seems like whenever I am stuck in a design project, the solution will be found on a trail somewhere around mile 5.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Take notes and know the world that surrounds you; travel and people watch as much as you can; pay attention to the details and don’t be afraid to ask questions.

 

Curtis R. Jennings, III
Curtis R. Jennings, III

Curtis R. Jennings, III

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: The Bicentennial Capital Mall – Nashville, Tn.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: “Digital Fortress” by Dan Brown

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: My father’s passion for architecture inspired my sister, brother, and I to all become architects.  It must have been the Lincoln logs and family vacations planned around project site visits.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Ride motorcycles and hike

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Travel as much as you can, discover what interests you, and enjoy life. 

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Frances Lengowski
Frances Lengowski

Frances Lengowski

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: My friends are re-modeling their house.  The place is in a wonderful state of open construction.  I’m moved by the possibility that ripping out walls, and digging around a foundation starts to open up.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: I recently went to Mexico and read through all kinds of books about Mayan ruins.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: A friend of mine pointed it out.  He saw the kind of art I was making and said I should think about architecture.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A:  I like to go for a run to re-set my mind.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Open your eyes, ears, senses, and mind — start noticing things.

 

Jaclyn K. Miller
Jaclyn K. Miller

Jaclyn K. Miller

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: While not a building per se, the proposed Delancey Underground or “Low Line” in New York City is what came to mind. My initial reaction was negative (who wants a park underground with no direct sunlight?), but now I’m warming up to the idea and am interested to see how their idea to reflect light underground works out. Being a fan of the High Line, I hope the Low Line will create a similar “outdoor” haven for city dwellers, not just a dark garden cave.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Well, I’m currently reading three books: “The Lemon Tree” by Sandy Tolan, “It Happened on the Way to War: A Marine’s Path to Peace” by Rye Barcott and “Ruthless Trust: The Ragamuffin’s Path to God” by Brennan Manning. I always seem to be reading three or more books at one time.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Through childhood dreaming. My dad’s interest in architecture brought my attention to it at a young age. That interest developed into a dream of creating and designing spaces, which slowly transformed through college into a desire to create architecture that transforms lives, brings hope and a lasting change to the poor and disadvantage overseas.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Eat good food with friends…or read a book with some coffee.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Ask questions and gain experience, any experience. Architecture encompasses so many channels and specialties; ask questions and try as many channels as possible to discover where your particular passion, drive and forte are.

 

Jennifer Rhoades
Jennifer Rhoades

Jennifer Rhoades

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: See the picture. I’ve recently returned from a trip to Italy. I studied in Florence as an undergrad ‐ I was so happy to see the Duomo again I just had to hug it.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: I have a stack of books next to my bed of old favorites, new reads, history books, book club titles, the occasional fluff ‐ but to be honest, the last book I read was “Prosciutto e Uova Verdi” – “Green Eggs and Ham” in Italian!

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I think it evolved slowly. I always loved drawing, looking at plans in magazines, making houses for my sister’s dolls. In college I found myself focusing on architectural history courses and realized I wanted to attend graduate school for architecture.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: I have an old house that needs a lot of attention, so I tend to put my energy into that these days– with a glass of wine in my hand, of course. I also love walking, especially down Monument Avenue in Richmond. With every house I pass I’m transported to a different country – England, Italy, Germany, France!

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Have fun. Take time to travel, to look at the built world around you, to simply be creative. You will have plenty of time to work. And once you do start working, take off your headphones and listen to what’s going on in the office around you. It’s the best way to learn.

 

Josephine V. Arbaugh
Josephine V. Arbaugh

Josephine V. Arbaugh

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Not a building but a public space…High Line Park in New York City; what a great example of good planning and urban design. What can be more sustainable than bringing underutilized infrastructure back to good use?!

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Nowadays it’s mostly ARE books for me. The last “for fun” book I read was “Brida” by my favorite, Brazilian author Paulo Coelho

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Through drawing and traveling

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Hammock and a glass of wine

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Be true to yourself and others

 

Kevin Jones
Kevin Jones

Kevin Jones

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: “The Element” by Ken Robinson

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Slowly, over time, and after a detour through research science.  It probably started with site visits to construction projects at National and Dulles airports with my father.  Art classes and Legos® are probably to blame, too.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Turn on some music and spend time with my wife and kids.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Take advantage of every chance you can get to experience the construction process and really get to know all the people involved.

 

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Marcus R. Thomas
Marcus R. Thomas

Marcus R. Thomas

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: The Orange Cube in Lyons, France

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: “The Tipping Point” by Malcolm Gladwell

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

 A: Though my childhood attachment to Lego®, helping my father with small carpentry projects, and my high school mentor.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Workout or escape somewhere quiet and peaceful to simply think

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: As a student, I find that it is a very rewarding career path where problem solving is the name of the game.  Focus and make sure you have a real love and passion for the field.

 

Spencer Lepler, AIA, NCARB
Spencer Lepler, AIA, NCARB

Spencer Lepler

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: After our April session we had a walking tour through Old Town Alexandria, VA and the thing that struck me the most was the negative reaction I had to the urban renewal infill architecture.  It just felt out of scale, out of place, and out of time with the rest of the old city.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The last book I read was “Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes” by William Bridges.  It was recommended to me by a friend who is a life coach and has some really interesting insight about taking time to understand and direct the changes that occur in your life.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I stumbled into architecture, really.  I was a freshman at Tulane University in the Liberal Arts program and took a class “Introduction to Architecture for Non Majors” and realized that this was the career for me.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: In my free time I enjoy doing fiber arts (knitting, spinning, weaving, dying).  It provides me with a creative output where at the end of the day I can point to a physical object and say “I made that.”  As compared to architecture where it may take years or even decades before your work takes physical form.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Be realistic about this profession, set goals, and stick to them.  You may never get rich being an architect, but if you take an active role in the development of your career this profession can be very rewarding.


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Roderick Williams
Roderick Williams

Roderick Williams

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I’ve been noticing a lot of older precast buildings lately (circa 60s, 70s) … It’s hard for me to imagine that at one time these were considered cutting edge. I guess some “youngsters” will be saying similar things about buildings I’ve worked on in another 40-50 years.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: “The Cost of Discipleship”…It’s a great book by Dietrich Bonhoffer about Christian living.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

 A: I actually stumbled into it. I had a friend who was in the architectural program and one day he was complaining about the fact that they had to be creative and do designs, etc.  That piqued my interest because I grew up being good at art and always had an interest in how things went together.  I took the entrance exam and the rest is history.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: With young kids around there isn’t much relaxing going on, but I do enjoy the occasional walk in the park or on a bike trail.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Do what you’re passionate about and the rest of life will fall into place.

Emerging Leaders in Architecture 2012 is sponsored by Hanbury, Evans, Wright, Vlattas + Company, Glavé and Holmes Architecture, and BB&T Insurance Services


 

 

YAF Celebrates 20 Years at Summit

YAF Summit- graphic by Greg Gersch
YAF Summit 20 -- graphic by Greg Gersch

Every five years, the Young Architects Forum (YAF) hosts a summit to reevaluate the needs of young architects. The 2012 summit marks the twentieth anniversary of the group, bringing together more than 60 design professionals – including students, interns, young architect AIA members and non-AIA members – to discuss top issues affecting young architects. The YAF Summit20 outcomes will assist with the development of a strategic plan for the YAF.

An initial survey administered by the YAF developed the groundwork for the YAF Summit20 agenda and top issues. View the survey results (PDF). During the summit, Roy Abernathy, AIA, facilitated the establishment of six top issues from the survey information through voting methods with attendees. Breakout sessions were used to further develop each of the top six issues.

The top six issues graphics:

Career Advancement (PDF)

Advancement of the Profession (PDF)

Value of Design (PDF)

Starting Your Own Firm (PDF)

Value of Licensure (PDF)

Economy & Change (PDF)

Download the Summit20 Outcomes Report (PDF)