Tag Archive | "Emerging Leaders in Architecture"

ELA Project Helps Win Grant

Congratulations to AIA Virginia’s 2015 Emerging Leaders in Architecture!  Their project, “Porous City,” helped the Commonwealth of Virginia land a $120,549,000 grant from the National Disaster Resilience Competition (NDRC), sponsored by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The grant, announced recently in Norfolk by HUD Secretary Julian Castro, Governor Terry McAuliffe, and Michael Berkowitz from the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities, will be used to address sea level rise in the Hampton Roads region.

The 2015 ELA project, “Porous City – a digital test lab of current + future resiliency strategies for the City of Norfolk,” focused on the Chesterfield Heights neighborhood in Norfolk. The results included a website they created (www.porouscity.com) and an education program as well as design concepts applicable to coastal flooding areas throughout the region. ELA’s project supported the NDRC application by demonstrating ongoing and innovative research into scalable and repeatable strategies for flood-prone communities.

Each year, ELA participants complete a real-world project where they experiment with practical application of the principles discussed in the ELA sessions. Communities selected for the projects actively participate in the process and benefit not only from the creative, innovative problem-solving ideas developed by these young architects, but also from the ELA recommendations for implementation. Great work, AIA ELA 2015!

AIA ELA website:
http://www.porouscity.com/

Winning application:
http://www.dhcd.virginia.gov/index.php/virginias-resiliency-plan.html

ODU news:
http://www.odu.edu/news/2016/1/hud_grant#.VqZJvVKTr5d

100 Resilient Cities:
https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/our-work/initiatives/100-resilient-cities/

Thank you to Brian Frickie, AIA and Mel Price for contributing this article.

Posted in Professional Development News

ELA Class of 2016

2016 Emerging Leaders In Architecture

Friday, January 8th marked the kickoff for 2016’s Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) program. Sixteen of Virginia’s best and brightest young architects met at The Branch Museum of Architecture and Design to get started on this year’s project, learn a little bit more about each other and hear from two excellent speakers about the past of the profession and the future of creativity.

In this session, the students learned about the history of the profession from Bryan Clark Green, Ph. D., who has done extensive research about the preservation of Virginia’s historical architecture. Green received honorary membership in AIA Virginia at the 2014 Visions for Architecture gala for his efforts. Kelly O’Keefe, who has won Entrepreneur of the Year and Ad Person of the Year, spoke to the students about how the responsibilities of leaders and industries have changed over the years, and how the students need to set themselves up to meet the future changes head on.

The students will apply these insights while working on their annual project. This year is structured differently than previous years as the students will be selecting a project from a select group of options chosen by the ELA Steering Committee. The students will soon choose which brief they would like to focus on, and will tour the location in March. They will work on solutions to this program brief and present their solutions in November at Architecture Exchange East 2016.

The ELA program began in 2009 and now has over 80 alumni — many of which have assumed leadership positions in their respective firms and AIA components. Currently, there is an ELA alum or current participant on the board of every AIA component in Virginia.

Follow ELA on Facebook

Please contact Marshall Dreiling, mdreiling@aiava.org, (804) 237-1769 with any questions about this program.

Posted in Featured, Professional Development News

Call for Applications – ELA Class of 2016

Application deadline extended to Nov. 30, 2015. Apply today! 

AIA Virginia announces a call for applications for the 2016 class of Emerging Leaders in Architecture: An Honors Academy of AIA Virginia (ELA).

ELA is an intensive program of educational sessions structured around presentations, discussions, team exploration, analysis, consensus-building, collaboration, and case study activities undertaken over the course of a year by a small cadre of participants selected for their potential to be outstanding contributors to the profession and the community. Facilitators and mentors who are established leaders in the building, finance, non-profit, development, university, legal, consulting, and design professions and in the community at large develop and deliver the sessions, designed to provide participants with advanced knowledge and skills related to specific areas of leadership and practice.

The program consists of seven, day-long seminars, several work sessions, culminating with a presentation at Architecture Exchange East. Download the program outline and application. The seminars are interactive, drawing on real examples and actively involving participants. They rotate among sites in Roanoke, Charlottesville, Richmond, Alexandria and Norfolk in conjunction with the firms, schools, and the local AIA component in each area.

How to Apply

The committee seeks applicants from three categories:

Component Nominees Each of the five Virginia AIA local component Boards may nominate one or more individuals for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each chapter for a total of five.

Student Nominees Each Virginia Architecture School (UVa, VT, Hampton, and WAAC) may nominate one or more students for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each school for a total of four.

Open Applications Applicants may apply on their own or be nominated by someone else.  Seven participants will be selected from among these applicants.

Find out more information by downloading the program outline and application (hyperlink to the same file as above) or by contacting Marshall Dreiling (hyperlinked to my email). The application deadline is Nov. 15, 2015.

How to Apply

The committee seeks applicants from three categories:

Component Nominees: Each of the five Virginia AIA local component Boards may nominate one or more individuals for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each chapter for a total of five.

Student Nominees: Each Virginia Architecture School (UVa, VT, Hampton, and WAAC) may nominate one or more students for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each school for a total of four.

Open Applications: Applicants may apply on their own or be nominated by someone else.  Seven participants will be selected from among these applicants.

Find out more information by downloading the program outline and application or by contacting Marshall Dreiling.

Posted in Professional Development News

Profiles of Emerging Leaders 2015

AIA Virginia’s award-winning Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) program was developed to jump-start the careers of young professionals. Conceived of and lead by a passionate steering committee of successful architects, the program was designed to share the things they wished they had learned in architecture school.

Each of the seven day-long-sessions focus on developing essential skills like financial management, communication and negotiation, advocacy and public service, and much more.

Want to be a member of this elite group of leaders? Apply to be a member of the ELA class of 2016. Contact Marshall Dreiling for more information on how to nominate an emerging leader or with questions about the program.

We were curious about these leaders, so we asked members of the ELA class of 2015 the same five questions, and this is what they had to say.

Isabel Argoti

Isabel Argoti

Isabel Argoti

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: The Woodies Building in Washington D.C. – positive. It has an interesting combination of classical architecture with intense color décor.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: Consider Lily by Anne Dayton and May Vanderbilt

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: My uncle is a contractor. I grew up around amazing houses and mansions being built my family first hand. Seeing the plans in drawings in his office come to life absolutely fascinated me. I wanted to design the houses he built, and plus he always told me that he would build my designs.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Sleep. Architects do not sleep enough.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: I am still an aspiring architect myself. But find your inner drive for architects –I can’t see myself studying or pursing anything else in school and that makes the late nights easier.

 

Taylor Clark

Taylor Clark

Taylor Clark

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: The ruins of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Harpers Ferry. Good architecture should aspire to leave beautiful ruins.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: Breakfast of Champions – Kurt Vonnegut

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: In my previous life, I studied and performed music. When I first heard Goethe’s quote, “Music is liquid architecture. Architecture is frozen music,” I was hooked.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Play my guitar or upright bass.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: A professor once told me, “If the only tool I have is a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail.” Build a well-rounded knowledge of things beyond architecture. Also, spend some time swinging a hammer.

 

Angella Dariah

Angella Dariah

Angella Dariah

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: The Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscript Library on Yale’s campus gave me a positive reaction. I thought it was quite interesting how this huge concrete block was being held by just these four tiny pillars on each corner.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: Honestly, the last book I read was the Handbook for the Practice of Architecture. I’m one of the few in this ELA group that is still in school.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: My dad is an architect in Hartford, CT, and when I was little, he always took me to work with him whenever I was off from school. From then, it was history.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: I absolutely love to sing and dance. Some people may say that these two activities are far from relaxing, but to me, they bring you to a whole other place, away from your problems, thoughts etc.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: I know it’s so cliché but, FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS AND NEVER GIVE UP! Don’t be that person that always says “I should have”; be the person that always says “I have” (and then some lol).

 

Matthew Fadel

Matthew Fadel

Matthew Fadel

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: I just got back from a trip where I was able to see The Guggenheim in Bilbao from the outside. The most interesting part was the large portion of building that was left open to the elements, allowing people to see how the materials come together.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: Since having my first-born child this past year, I’ve been looking forward to reading many different things.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: Not until I was introduced to architectural theory in college; I found the philosophy and the thinking that guides design to be alluring and very powerful. Being able to convincingly reason aesthetic expression hooked me and opened me up to the profession in new ways.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Stream programs via Netflix with my wife

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Take the initiative with your professional education and advancement; do not wait for things to be handed to you. Ask for them, demand them, and when you’re faced with issues that are new and unknown, don’t hesitate to ask questions.

 

ELA advertisement HEWV

 

 

 

 

 

Erika Feggestad

Erika Feggestad

Erika Feggestad

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: The Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library by Gordon Bunshaft. It didn’t look like much to me on the outside, but the inside is amazing when the sun is filtering through the marble.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: Who wouldn’t want to draw pretty pictures for a living?

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Sit on the beach and read a book.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Your social skills can be as important as your design skills in this profession.

 

Lynden P. Garland, AIA

Lynden P. Garland, AIA, MBA, CDT, LEED AP

Lynden P. Garland, AIA, MBA, CDT, LEED AP

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: The National Building Museum in Washington DC – It’s just an incredible space.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: 1776 by David McCullough and Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic by Kent Seltman and Leonard Berry

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: I have always had a passion for learning and sharing knowledge to help and improve people’s lives. My personal mantra is to find ways of making today better than yesterday. Once I realized how architecture could deeply affect people, it became the vehicle that allowed me to best express my personal mantra.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Cooking and baking are always a great joy. I’m a bit of a foodie and I like to try new recipes. I also make sure to work out. It helps to relieve stress and, more importantly, it allows me to eat whatever I want.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: It’s smart to admit that you don’t know, just make sure you’re asking plenty of questions. Never let anyone diminish you, your work, or the value of your profession.

 

Emily Hope

Emily Hope

Emily Hope

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: Women’s Opportunity Centre by Sharon Davis Design located in Rwanda, completed in 2013. It is a campus development that includes a series of circular pavilions, built with materials that were locally sourced and produced. The design thoughtfully responds to the project’s climate, its program and the needs of its users in a way that I find inspiring.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: 1493 by Charles Mann

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: It was just a realization of the common theme in all my childhood pursuits- killing dinosaurs was never as much fun as laying out the base camp.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Take a long walk while drinking a nice, strong cup of tea.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: The reality of getting projects built will zap your enthusiasm if architecture is only a mild interest. Make sure being an architect is your true goal. Own the person you are and find a way to pursue your passion.

 

Chelsea Lindsey

Chelsea Lindsey

Chelsea Lindsey

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: I actually just visited the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial at night. There was something very powerful about visiting such iconic monuments while they were lit.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: I’ve just started to read I Know This Much Is True by Wally Lamb.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: My passion evolved while I was very young. I had a dollhouse that after a few years I realized was not large enough for the plastic family that lived inside. I decide to add an addition made entirely out of empty tissue boxes and books. Then in third grade, our teacher presented a lesson on architecture, where we learned about a few famous buildings and architects and why there are different typologies of building depending on their specific location. Around the same time, I started to look at mail order blueprint home magazines. I would look at a house plan and start sketching different ways to redesign the house. All of that pushed me towards a passion for design and the desire to become an architect.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: I love doing yoga as a way to relax. I also really enjoy experimenting with cooking and baking, though not everything is a success!

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: If you are really passionate about architecture, you’ll find a way to make your dream come true. It takes a lot of hard work to go from an interest in architecture and design in high school to becoming licensed, but the people who have that passion will find a way to make their dream into a reality. Also, don’t be afraid to ask questions, that really is the best way to learn.

 

AJ-Medina-VS-AIA-ELA-2015

 

 

 

 

Alejandro J. Medina

Alejandro Medina

Alejandro Medina

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: Lately I am not so much in love with “great architecture” but I am taking great note of the offices of other business associates in a wide range of professions. I can’t say that I have a strong conclusion yet, but rather a sense that we need to devote more attention and design to the places of employment where more of America spends its life.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: The last book I read was given to me by ELA. It is called Walkable City.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: When I was a young kid I watched Sleepless in Seattle; Tom Hank’s character in that movie is an architect. That’s where it all started but of course it grew from there.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: I Create. It’s in my nature. Sometimes it is woodworking or photography. My focus right now is creating/launching a new young professional organization for Hampton Roads called THRIVE.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Stay strong if you love it. The profession requires many sacrifices, but all of it is worth it when you see you first building come to life. Especially when you realize that what you created will live long past your time on this earth.

 

ELA advertisement HEWV

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Morgan

Elizabeth Morgan

Elizabeth Morgan

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: I was recently shocked by renderings for a new skyscraper at the Thermal Baths in Vals, Switzerland by Morphosis Architects. Having visited Peter Zumthor’s Therme Vals a few years ago, and delighting in the building’s sensitivity to place, scale, light, sound, and material, I can only say that this new resort hotel appears to be on the other end of the spectrum.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: Beautiful Ruins, a novel by Jess Walter

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: While in college pursuing a fine art degree, I became involved with a couple of non-profit organizations and found that I had great passion for both creating and community outreach. Art and architecture have always been present in my life, (my dad is a landscape architect/designer and my mother is an artist in many ways), but I never really considered how well my interests and skills aligned with the profession of architecture until I read two books: “Design Like You Give a Damn” by Cameron Sinclair and “Rural Studio: Samuel Mockbee and an Architecture of Decency” by Dean and Hursley.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: I relax either by practicing yoga or sipping on a martini with a good book, usually not together though. I’m also a sucker for a well-made film or television series.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Don’t take yourself too seriously but put some serious energy and positivity in to your work, and nurture the relationships you make with colleagues/faculty/mentors in school and beyond.

 

CHP-Design-Studio_AIA-Newsletter-Ad-6

 

 

 

 

Kristin Moye

Kristin Moye

Kristin Moye

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: Not a building, but The Plot 2.0 in downtown Norfolk by Work Program Architects is a really fun civic project that I thoroughly enjoyed.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: Through my academic community. I had some incredible professors and some amazing friends who showed me that architecture is a challenging and wildly beneficial profession for the soul and for the community.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Read science fiction novels.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Find a community of architects, builders, engineers, or tinkerers that you can talk to openly about architecture and the built environment. Don’t stop talking about it.

 

DBI_AIA-06-2015-Ad

 

 

 

 

 

Vanessa Raquel Reisin

Vanessa Reisin

Vanessa Reisin (right)

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: Casa Azul – Frida Kahlo’s house in Mexico City

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: My path was indirect, however gave me the background and experience that brought me to where I am today. I studied and worked in urban planning for a few years before exploring architecture through two non-degree graduate programs in New York and Paris. The exhilaration and pure adrenaline of studio drew me in.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Eat. I love big meals with close friends and family.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Take advantage of all of your resources, especially the architects around you of earlier generations. Be engaged, and present, and humble, yet bold. Travel.

 

John A. Salmons

John Salmons

John Salmons

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: The Walters in Baltimore. It was a positive reaction for me; I really enjoyed how the spaces flowed into one another.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: The last book that I read was Thinking Architecture by Peter Zumthor

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: It was on a trip to New York, when I saw the Guggenheim I knew I wanted to be an architect.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: I really enjoy day trips, traveling is the best way to find unexpected wonders of architecture.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Don’t ever give up on the passion that fires your inspiration.

 

AIA Emerging Leader-Shumate_ad_V3

 

 

 

 

Lauren Shumate

Lauren Shumate

Lauren Shumate

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: Hagia Sofia (Istanbul, Turkey) – positive

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: I’ve always liked the idea of architecture (played with lots of legos as a kid, etc.) but it wasn’t until my first architecture studio that I had an outlet for my creativity and I developed a true passion for design.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: I love to travel. There is nothing like dropping into a new culture and experiencing new food, language, and people. My husband and I recently took a trip to Istanbul and I highly recommend it!

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Work hard but value quality, contribution, and a healthy work/life balance above all. Value relationships with classmates and colleagues – the architecture profession is much smaller than you may realize – you will continue to cross paths!

 

ELAprofilesAd-bcwh

 

 

 

 

Emily Striffler, Assoc. AIA

Emily Striffler, Assoc. AIA

Emily Striffler, Assoc. AIA

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: While in Cape Cod we came across the East Sandwich Preparative Quaker Meeting House, which was built over 200 years ago. It’s a very humble building, but it is incredibly well made. Everything was thought about as it was built, and the materials are honest and rough. It’s still used today, and that really caused me to pause and appreciate its simplicity and timelessness.

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: The life-changing magic of tidying up by Marie Kondo

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: My mother is an artist and my father is an engineer – I can’t recall a specific moment where I discovered it – I think my upbringing enabled me to acknowledge it very early in life.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Gardening. Can’t beat it, in my opinion. Walking the dog is a close second!

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Relax, and find time to do something that interests you every day.

 

Daniel Whitmire

Daniel Whitmire

Daniel Whitmire

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?
A: Morphosis Architect’s minimalist skyscraper at Vals – I’m intrigued!

Q: What is the last book you read?
A: Mere Christianity

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?
A: I realized I loved architecture during my 4th year of architecture school at Virginia Tech

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?
A: Fighting and other non-relaxing things

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?
A: Pay attention – you can see more by traveling less. Also, pens are invaluable!

Posted in Professional Development News

The Benefits of Working Together

At their June meeting, the Emerging Leaders in Architecture students learned the importance of working together — a vital tool as they continue to work on their class project in Chesterfield Heights, Norfolk.
IMG_4566

The students heard from Mike Evans, FAIA, former president of Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company, who spoke about the architect’s mind and heart. This talk built upon the previous session in Alexandria on collaboration and embracing the strengths of team members. The students also heard from Brian Frickie, AIA, and a number of recent graduates of the ELA program who furthered this message.

After lunch, the students participated in a panel discussion and case study focusing on working with developers and contractors. Skip Smith, Vice President of Development at W.M. Jordan Company, and Mark Payne, Vice President of S.B. Ballard Construction Company, were on hand to answer the students’ questions and provide different perspectives for the case study.

Follow the Emerging Leaders in Architecture Facebook page

Posted in Professional Development News

Emerging Leaders Learn to Communicate Effectively

The 2015 Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) class met in May where the focus was on helping the students write more persuasively and present more effectively.

Ed Crews, principal at Crews Communications, spoke to the students about some of the outlining, writing, and editing that he has seen improve his and others work over the years. He took the students through a series of writing exercises designed to help the students make their point efficiently and effectively.

photo by Marshall Dreiling

photo by Marshall Dreiling

Michael Chapman from the Martin Agency reviewed some of the techniques that the agency uses to make their presentations more impactful. From his experience on being part of the teams that have made some of the most memorable commercials in recent years, he explained to the students that each presentation should be a story.

Work continues on the class project – the neighborhood of Chesterfield Heights in Norfolk. Each student individually presented their ideas of how to deal with the problem of the rising sea level in this area.

The students next session will be taking place on June 12, 2015 in Virginia Beach where they will be learning about the importance of group work dynamics.

Posted in Professional Development News

ELA Class of 2015 Kicks off the Year

Friday, January 9th marked the kickoff for 2015’s Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) class. Sixteen of Virginia’s best and brightest young architects met at the Virginia Center for Architecture to get started on this year’s project, learn a little bit more about each other and hear from two excellent speakers about the past of the profession and the future of leadership.

In this session, the students learned about the history of the profession from Bryan Clark Green, Ph. D., who has done extensive research about the preservation of Virginia’s historical Architecture. Bryan Clark Green, Ph. D., recently became an honorary member of the Virginia Society AIA for his efforts. Kelly O’Keefe, who has won Entrepreneur of the Year and Ad Person of the Year, spoke to the students about how the responsibilities of leaders and industries have changed over the years, and how the students need to set themselves up to meet the future changes head on.

The students will apply these insights while working on their annual project — a section of historical Norfolk that is in danger of being lost to floods and rising ocean levels. The students will be visiting the site in March, and will work on solutions to this problem and present their solutions in November at Architecture Exchange East 2015.

The ELA program began in 2009 and now has over 80 alumni — many of which have assumed leadership positions in their firms and AIA components. Currently there is an ELA alum or current participant on the board of every AIA component in Virginia.

Posted in Featured

Introducing the Emerging Leaders Class of 2015

The seventh class of the Emerging Leaders in Architecture: An Honors Academy of the Virginia Society AIA has been selected.

© 2006, The American Institute of Architects. All rights reserved.

© 2006, The American Institute of Architects. All rights reserved.

As in every year, the 2015 class is comprised of some of the best and brightest young professionals and students Virginia has to offer.  Participants include one student from each of the Virginia architecture schools, one designee from each local AIA component, and seven “at-large” participants.  They come from all over the Commonwealth, from firms large and small, and share the common characteristic that they have been identified as someone with potential to be a leader in the profession and the community.

2015 Class:  Isabel Argoti; Taylor Clark, Assoc. AIA; Angella Dariah; Matthew Fadel, Assoc. AIA; Erika Feggestad, Assoc. AIA; Lynden Garland, AIA; Emily Hope, Assoc. AIA; Chelsea Lindsey, LEED AP BD+C; Alejandro Medina, AIA; Elizabeth Morgan, Assoc. AIA; Kristin Moye, Assoc. AIA; Vanessa Reisin, Assoc. AIA; John Salmons; Lauren Shumate; Emily Striffler, Assoc. AIA; Daniel Whitmire, Assoc. AIA.

The ELA program begin in 2009 and now has over 70 alumni — many of which have assumed leadership positions in their firms and AIA components.  Currently there is an ELA alum or current participant on the board of every AIA component in Virginia.

 

Posted in Professional Development News

Call for Applications: Emerging Leaders in Architecture Class of 2015

The Virginia Society AIA announces a call for applications for the 2015 class of Emerging Leaders in Architecture: An Honors Academy of the Virginia Society AIA (ELA).

ELA is an intensive program of educational sessions structured around presentations, discussions, team exploration, analysis, consensus-building, collaboration, and case study activities undertaken over the course of a year by a small cadre of participants selected for their potential to be outstanding contributors to the profession and the community. Facilitators and mentors who are established leaders in the building, finance, non-profit, development, university, legal, consulting, and design professions and in the community at large develop and deliver the sessions, designed to provide participants with advanced knowledge and skills related to specific areas of leadership and practice.

The program consists of seven day-long seminars, several work sessions, culminating with a presentation at Architecture Exchange East. The application is available here. The seminars are interactive, drawing on real examples and actively involving participants. They rotate among sites in Roanoke, Charlottesville, Richmond, Alexandria and Norfolk in conjunction with the firms, schools, and the local AIA component in each area.

How to Apply

The committee seeks applicants from three categories:

Component Nominees Each of the five Virginia AIA local component Boards may nominate one or more individuals for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each chapter for a total of five.

Student Nominees Each Virginia Architecture School (UVa, VT, Hampton, and WAAC) may nominate one or more students for admission to the program.  One participant will be selected from each school for a total of four.

Open Applications Applicants may apply on their own or be nominated by someone else.  Seven participants will be selected from among these applicants.

Find out more information by downloading the program outline and application or by contacting Rhea George. The application deadline is Nov. 14, 2014.

The 2014 Emerging Leaders in Architecture program is sponsored by Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company.

Posted in Professional Development News

Profiles in Emerging Leaders 2014

The Society’s award-winning Emerging Leaders in Architecture (ELA) program was developed to jump-start the careers of young professionals. Conceived of and lead by a passionate steering committee of successful architects, the program was designed to share the things they wished they had learned in architecture school.

Each of the seven day-long-sessions focus on developing essential skills like financial management, communication and negotiation, advocacy and public service, and much more.

Want to be a member of this elite group of leaders? Apply to be a member of the ELA class of 2015. Contact Rhea George for more information on how to nominate an emerging leader or with questions about the program.

We were curious about these leaders, so we asked members of the ELA class of 2014 the same five questions, and this is what they had to say.

Jason Albers, AIA

Jason Albers, AIA

Jason Albers, AIA

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I went to New York last summer, and while it wasn’t quite finished, One World Trade Center seemed like a missed opportunity.  The design wasn’t very exciting or dramatic, overall pretty tame actually.  It could have been much more than a really tall glass box.  Though, I also visited the memorial grounds and that was a very solemn and powerful experience.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens.  A while back, I thought it would be a good idea to try and read some of the classics of literature, at least one per year.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A:  That discovery has been a continuous, gradual process over the years, and is ongoing.  I first became interested in architecture when, in high school, my family was moving to a new house and I enjoyed looking through the sample floor plans and imagining the space in my head.  But now, after moving to the dense urban D.C.-area, I have really come to love the challenges of designing within tight urban infill sites while contributing to the downtown experience.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: This is going to sound strange, but playing soccer.  While it can be strenuous, exhausting, exciting and frustrating at times, I can become completely absorbed into the game and forget about everything else in the world.  I love the game so much and have been playing for so long that I can rely solely on my instincts, turn my mind off for 90 minutes and just enjoy myself.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: The best architects are the ones that find a good balance between showing confidence and humility, between being opinionated and deferential.  Much of practicing architecture is working with people, be it clients, consultants, contractors and coworkers, so being approachable and collaborative is important.  Though it’s also critical to be able to stand up for what you believe in, and know when the time is right to do that.

Alicia Canady

Alicia Canady

Alicia Canady

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: The Chicago Tribune building in Chicago recently caused a strong reaction of admiration.  I love Neo-Gothic architecture when it comes to studying older architectural styles.  It was impressive to see this building still standing and dominating the city block while next to buildings like the Trump Tower.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The last book I read was They Tell Me of a Home by Daniel Black.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A:   I discovered my passion for architecture during my junior year of high school when I realized I loved art and math.  I had watched my father design and build our basement.  It made me want to be able to create spaces that help improve people’s lives through very strong artistic qualities.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: My favorite thing to do to relax is split equally between about four different things.  I either play video games, watch movies or shows, drive without a destination, or listen to music.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: I would advise aspiring architects to always stay true to their style of design and learn to handle constructive criticism to make yourself better.  I would also suggest to be open to any advice from your peers and mentors. Most importantly, just love what you do no matter how hard it gets.

Alex Helms

Alex Helms

Alex Helms

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Hancock Tower – Chicago, Ill.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: As a kid, my tools for building were tape, cardboard and Lego. Ever since then, I’ve always had a passion for learning how things went together and architecture allowed me to pursue that passion at various scales (master planning to wall assemblies).

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Woodworking and building furniture

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Passion trumps talent. Skills utilizing architecture tools develop over time and with practice; talent uses those tools to design creativity. Passion for architecture allows you to love what you do and not give up through the coming struggles.

ELAprofilesAd-BCWH

Emily F. Hogan, Assoc. AIA

Emily F. Hogan, Assoc. AIA

Emily F. Hogan, Assoc. AIA 

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I visited Graceland last summer.  It was simultaneously both.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The Kaplan ARE study guide.  Before that: Lean In by Sheryl Sandburg.  The latter was a brilliant, inspiring must-read that I can’t recommend highly enough; the former—not so much.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I always had an interest in design and making, and that initially led me to pursue a degree in interior design.  Early in my undergraduate studies, however, I realized my interests aligned more closely with the field of architecture.  Once I got to architecture school a few years later I was hooked.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Spend time in the back yard with my husband, dog, a magazine, and the grill.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: If you’re considering becoming an architect, make sure you’re 100% committed.  This profession requires intensity and passion.  It’s not for the half-hearted.

Evan MacKenzie, Assoc. AIA

Evan MacKenzie, Assoc. AIA

Evan MacKenzie, Assoc. AIA

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: I had the opportunity to enjoy an evening picnic with some friends from Spatial Affairs Bureau on a farm outside of Gordonsville where they designed and helped build a series of pavilions. They curated a beautiful experience — smells of cedar and fresh rain, the flickering of fireflies, croaking frogs, laughter and beer — and the sense that we were meant to be there.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: I’m in the middle of several books, but over the last couple of years nobody has made me think more than The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates. His blog posts and articles are human and illuminating and important, and it’s been enthralling to see his thoughts and ideas evolve in the blog format as part of a conversation with his readers.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Honestly every day is a struggle to find it — my passion is for people and ideas, and at its best architecture provides an avenue for engaging that passion in a very real way.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Sit on a rock in the James River.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: 1. We’re all in this together.

2. Get some sleep.

3. Draw every day.

Lauren A. Nelson

Lauren A. Nelson

Lauren A. Nelson

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Studying this summer in Rome, I am inspired by the history and the layering of new and old in the buildings.  I am also impressed by the piazza archetype as a successful model for urban public space.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The Defining Decade by Meg Jay.  I am also reading articles for independent research on the effects of daylighting on design and health.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I first discovered that architecture might be for me when I attended an AIA Shadow Day in high school in the Hampton Roads area.  I then applied to architecture schools for college, and my passion really developed through the process of learning, thinking, drawing, and making.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Figure Skating, Sketching, and Painting

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Develop your interests and passions for architecture by seeking out opportunities and by learning as much as you can.  Be inspired to ask new questions and to push the boundaries of the discipline.  Remember, architecture is just as much a process as it is a product, so allow yourself the opportunity to make new discoveries along the way.

ELAprofilesAd-BCWH

Kylan Shirley, Assoc. AIA

Kylan Shirley, Assoc. AIA

Kylan Shirley, AIA

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A:  The Hunt Library at NC State

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: Six Thinking Hats by Edward De Bono

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: My father is an architect and I knew as soon as I got my hands on a lead holder and a scale

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Ride a bike

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Learn about everything.

Nick_RobertBeachArchitects150x100

Nicholas R. Valadez, Assoc. AIA

Nicholas R. Valadez, Assoc. AIA

Nicholas R. Valadez, Assoc. AIA

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Villa Müller by Adolf Loos.  The intertwining spaces in this house seem composed as it were were the program for its inhabitants’ lives.  Informing their actions rather than responding to them.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: I’m currently reading Shogun by James Clavell. A fictional account of the West’s early encounters with feudal Japan.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: Although I had a strong interest in architecture, I did not discover my passion for it until I was in college. Eero Saarinen’s MIT Chapel taught me that buildings could be more than the sum of their parts.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: I spend time outdoors.  Hiking, cycling, and even yard work.  I’m happy as long as I get some fresh air.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Try to understand how building elements work and why designs are successful.  More importantly, ask questions, be curious, and never forget to be patient.  It’s easy to know good work when you see it but significantly more difficult to create it.  View your work with the same eyes you view others’.

Tyler Whitney

Tyler Whitney

Tyler Whitney

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Calatrava’s new PATH station near the World Trade Center – you cannot step into that space without feeling awestruck

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: How Music Works by David Byrne

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: In high school the new building was being built around our trailer units and I found myself looking out the window for whole class periods.  Watching workers sculpt the earth and erect buildings out of that void sparked my interest in design.  We moved into the new building and I had an appreciation for the thought and the work that went into the design and construction.  Luckily they still had to build the stadium – I got to keep watching.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Turning on some tunes, grilling some food, and tossing some Frisbee.

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Go out and draw.  Explore the world around you and take in as much as you can.

Rachel I. Williams-Clark, Assoc. AIA

Q: What building evoked a strong reaction from you recently—either positive or negative?

A: Everything Gaudi did in Barcelona. I had always loved his work from afar, but when I finally got to see it in person I loved it even more. Whether a park or building, his work is always captivating.

Q: What is the last book you read?

A: The Psychopath Test (Jon Ronson) – I like to mix it up. A Walk in the Woods (Bill Bryson) – about hiking the Appalachian Trail.

Q: How did you discover your passion for architecture?

A: I grew up in a family of artists and always had a natural inclination towards the arts, but I also did well in math and science. By the time I got to college I realized I wanted to study a more “structured” art (I loved the precision of drafting). The University of Georgia didn’t have an architecture program so I studied interior design. However, I realized architecture was really what I wanted to do my junior year because I was always frustrated that my class projects never allowed me to explore the site or building exteriors. So, I finished up my undergrad degree and enrolled at Virginia Tech to get my masters in architecture.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do to relax?

A: Running. Sleeping. Sitting down with a nice IPA!

Q: What advice do you have for aspiring architects?

A: Diversify – become a jack of all trades and you’ll always be busy.

Posted in Membership News

Membership News

Professional Development News

Government Advocacy News

  • Liability for the Project Design © 2006, The American Institute of Architects. All rights reserved.

    In this article from Williams Mullen Construction Industry News, they explore two cases in 2015 that ask who will be liable for the costs and delay from defective design documents?







Supporters

Virginia Accord

  • The Virginia Accord VA_ACCORD_150x150

    Bringing together the planning and design disciplines to examine two key themes critical to the future — job creation and environmental sustainability — on Sept. 19-20, 2014 at the Virginia Accord.